Wouldn’t it be better if law schools behaved more like college football programs? I think it’d be pretty awesome. Hear me out:

  • Elite law candidates would be recruited by the accredited law schools. Most students would get scholarships to attend law school, instead of loans.
  • Weaker candidates could still “walk-on” and pay full price, but they’d know their chances of making it into Biglaw were low.
  • Two words: Biglaw Draft. “With the first pick Wachtell Lipton selects Yang Patel Shapiro — Berkeley Law. Elie Kiper Jr. reports that this is a huge blow to to Cravath who was hoping the Chinese Jewish student with the Indian mother who clerked for Scalia and Breyer would fall to them at #2.”

And that’s just the tip of the awesomeness iceberg.

Yes, that entire little fantasy was inspired by one, seven-word comment this week…

My God, could you imagine the Biglaw signing bonuses if firms drafted people who could always clerk for a year and re-enter the draft pool at a later date.

As usual, my hopes and dreams are probably unattainable, but the commenter who dreams of getting an ATL T-shirt (and what a sad dream that would be), can make it happen. This week’s comment of the week wasn’t elaborate or even particularly funny, it was just perfectly on point.

In response to our story about the University of Connecticut Law School Dean, Jeremy Paul, jumping ship to Northeastern in the middle of the summer, commenter IhateDisqus said:

He loses a year of eligibility, right?

Come on, buddy, administrative types never lose eligibility for backing out on their commitments. Schools try to only hurt students.

Sends us an email to collect your T-shirt.

Earlier: A Law Dean Switches Schools — Not At The End of the Year, But Right Now, Weeks Before Classes Start


comments sponsored by

20 comments (hidden for your protection) Show all comments