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Social acceptance of gay marriage in the United States is often compared to social acceptance of interracial marriage. However, while interracial marriage was completely legal by 1967, majority approval of interracial marriage did not take hold until the 1990s. How does popular opinion of gay marriage today compare with the current legal status of gay marriage?

The genius at xkcd demonstrates how popular approval and legal status don’t always neatly track one another…

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Stat Of The Week: Interracial Marriage vs. Gay Marriage”

Ed note: This post originally appeared on InfoLawGroup.

California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law an amendment to California’s data breach notification law on Monday. Although at least one news outlet has reported that the law requires a company to offer credit monitoring services, this interpretation is misguided. Rather, the law only places restrictions on certain companies if they choose to offer identity theft prevention and mitigation services. In addition, the law also prohibits persons from selling (or advertising or offering to sell) any individual’s social security number, subject to certain exceptions.

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “California Amends Data Breach Notification Law, Does Not Require Mandatory Offering of Credit Monitoring”

Here’s the deal: come out to a bar, play some trivia, win some stuff, hang out with some ATL editors. Sound like a plan? Well, if you’re in Washington, D.C., start marking your calendar.

Many of our D.C.-area law school readers have participated in past Above the Law and Kaplan Bar Review bar trivia nights. For those of you who haven’t, now’s your chance. Come on down and knock those snooty students from your rival schools down a peg. Check out these questions from a prior bar trivia night to see how well you’d have fared. Or just come on down to ask us what it’s like to make fun of people on the Internet for a living. Either way, it’s a good time.

We’ll convene for a night of free food, drinks, and quizzing on Thursday, November 6. Winners get mini iPads for their team (maximum of five per team).

Here are the full details:

Date: Thursday, November 6, 2014
Location: Bier Baron Tavern (1523 22nd St NW)
Doors Open: 6:15 p.m.
Start Time: 7:00 p.m.

Fill out the RSVP form after the jump to attend. We look forward to seeing you!

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “D.C. Law Students: Who Wants To Party With Us And Get Some Free Stuff?”


Nobody will be shocked that Wachtell Lipton placed on top of our first-ever ATL Power 100. Yet a full look at ATL’s inaugural law firm rankings does contain some surprises.

How did your firm do?

See the complete ranking (and methodology) here.

Thanks to our advertisers here at Above the Law:

If you’re interested in advertising on Above the Law or any other site in the Breaking Media network, please download our media kits or email advertising@breakingmedia.com. Thanks!

Ed note: This post originally appeared on Global Regulatory Enforcement Law Blog.

Unmanned aerial cameras have been legal in other parts of the world but prohibited for commercial use in the United States until last week, with the limited exception of two commercial-drone operations, which the FAA had previously approved for Alaskan oil operations. On September 25, 2014, the FAA announced that it approved certain uses of drones or unmanned aircraft systems (“UAS”) in the National Airspace System for film and TV productions. This is a breakthrough for the entertainment industry because drones allow filmmakers Superman-like abilities to take images at angles never before captured. Drones are able to cover altitudes lower than helicopters but higher than cranes, and can navigate indoor areas that are otherwise difficult or impossible to get to. However, the FAA’s approval is not without restriction.

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “It’s a Bird…it’s a Plane…it’s a Drone; FAA Approves Limited Use of Drones as Camera Platforms for Film and TV Production”

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Imagine for a moment that you are the HR Manager for a company with many physically demanding jobs. One of your employees submits a doctor’s note prohibiting her from lifting anything over 25 pounds. Mindful of your obligations under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), you check to see if the lifting restriction will prevent the employee from doing her job. Unfortunately, after checking the employee’s job description and talking with her supervisors, you conclude that lifting is a key part of the employee’s job (in legal terms, an “essential function”), and there is nothing practical that can be done (in legal terms, no “reasonable accommodation”) to allow her to perform her job. When you tell the employee that she cannot return to her job, she asks if there are other positions available within the company that she can be transferred to. You say you’ll look into it, but when you start asking around, things get complicated. There are a handful of open positions in other departments, but the job requirements are different and some of the positions already have applicants who seem better qualified. None of the positions have exactly the same pay as the employee’s warehouse position, so she would either be getting a raise or a demotion. What should you do?

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Beyond Essential Functions: The Role of Job Reassignments in Accommodating Employee Disabilities”

keyboard typing

“Cyber liability insurance” is often used to describe a range of insurance policies, in the same way that the word cyber is used to describe a broad range of information security related tools, processes and services. Everyone is talking about the need for “stand alone” cyber liability insurance policies. These stand-alone cyber liability insurance policies basically cover expenses related to the management of a breach, e.g, the investigation, remediation, notification and credit checking. However, cyber liability coverage is also found in some existing insurance policies, including kidnap and ransom and professional liability coverage. There may also be some limited coverage through a crime policy if electronic theft is added to that policy.

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Cyber Liability Insurance: Where’s the Beef?”

Gavel with American Flag

On September 18, 2014, InsideCounsel magazine held a corporate counsel conference to facilitate discussions on current legal issues. In sessions on governance and compliance, industry experts addressed the current top challenges that in-house attorneys face when managing enterprise risk.

Cybersecurity is no longer just a “technology” issue. It has become a business and legal issue. Compliance and management personnel must be trained and informed on the impact that cybersecurity risks present to the business. Companies must have a business response, not just a technical response, prepared for when something goes wrong. The question is not “whether” a cybersecurity issue will arise, but when.

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Top Five Governance & Compliance Hot Topics For General Counsel”

money in the hands

On July 23, 2014, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) voted 3–2 to significantly amend the regulatory framework of money market mutual funds (MMFs), particularly Rule 2a-7 under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the 1940 Act).1 These changes come four years after the SEC last adopted several amendments to Rule 2a-7 and follow a lengthy debate surrounding MMF reform among regulators and industry participants. The amendments and related regulations will drastically alter the MMF industry and force MMFs and their boards of directors and advisers to make substantial changes to their product offerings, operations, and compliance processes.

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “The New Era of Money Market Fund Regulation”

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