Books

  • Judges Gavel

    Books, Federal Judges, Law Professors, Law Schools, S.D.N.Y.

    How Judges Decide: An Interview With Joel Cohen

    How long will it be before other law schools copy this great idea for a class (if they don’t have such a course already)?

    6 Comments / / Nov 13, 2014 at 11:07 AM
  • High Speed

    6th Circuit, Biglaw, Books, Cars, Crime, Edwards Wildman, Federal Judges, Gay Marriage, Jeffrey Toobin, Law Schools, Layoffs, Morning Docket, SCOTUS, Sentencing Law, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 11.07.14

    * As mentioned earlier, the Sixth Circuit upheld same-sex marriage bans in four states. Judge Martha Craig Daughtrey’s dissent is a very fun read because it’s dripping with sarcasm. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Sentencing has been delayed for Dzhokar Tsarnaev’s friends during the pendency of the Yates case at SCOTUS. Like a grouper, a backpack may not be a “tangible object.” [National Law Journal]

    * Bingham McCutchen and Edwards Wildman Palmer are planning to shed lawyers and staff members in anticipation of their proposed mergers with Morgan Lewis and Locke Lord. Ouch. [Am Law Daily]

    * Weekend reading? ATL’s managing editor, David Lat, reviews Blindfolds Off (affiliate link), an interesting collection of interviews with judges about how they decide their toughest cases. [Wall Street Journal]

    * Everyone, please stop what you’re doing. Jeffrey Toobin has discovered that law schools are in trouble, and he’s on the case. You can read more information about this new phenomenon here. [The New Yorker]

    * Adam Tang, the man who drove a 26-mile loop around Manhattan in 24 minutes, was convicted of reckless driving without being present. Check out the video of his crazy drive, after the jump. [ABA Journal]

    17 Comments / / Nov 7, 2014 at 9:00 AM
  • Supreme Court SCOTUS photo by David Lat

    9th Circuit, Alex Kozinski, Books, Clerkships, Federal Judges, Feeder Judges, In-House Counsel, SCOTUS, Stephen Reinhardt, Supreme Court, Supreme Court Clerks

    Do You Harbor Supreme [Court] Ambitions?

    In-house columnist Mark Herrmann reviews Above the Law founder and managing editor David Lat’s forthcoming novel, Supreme Ambitions.

    27 Comments / / Nov 3, 2014 at 12:09 PM
  • 2nd Circuit, Books, Holidays and Seasons, Murder, Non-Sequiturs, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Wall Street

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.31.14

    * Thanks to Wonkette for pointing out that we were on this whole Ruth Baby Ginsburg thing last year. [Wonkette]

    * Speaking of our legally themed Halloween costume contest, please send us your nominations. [Above the Law]

    * Salacious allegations about a high-flying investment banker invite comparisons to The Wolf of Wall Street. [Dealbreaker]

    * The Second Circuit puts a stop to a legal challenge to the stop-and-frisk settlement. [How Appealing]

    * You’d expect a former lawmaker to have a better understanding of… the law. [Lexington Herald-Leader]

    * The Wall Street Journal reviews Paul Barrett’s new book (affiliate link) about the never-ending Chevron/Ecuador litigation. [Wall Street Journal]

    * Speaking of the Chevron/Ecuador matter, here’s more about the Canadian Bar Association’s controversial involvement, which Canada columnist Steve Dykstra covered earlier. [rabble.ca]

    * Some thoughts from Jonathan Mermin on something lawyers see every day: bad arguments. [Green Bag]

    * Here’s a great new resource for our fellow aficionados of appellate arguments. [Free Law Project]

    2 Comments / / Oct 31, 2014 at 4:47 PM
  • career-files-180x100-RF

    Books, Career Center, Career Files, Finance, Lawyers

    From The Career Files: 10 Top Investing Books For Biglaw Associates

    We believe investors are made, not born. And for even the most advanced financial whizzes, ongoing education remains a key part of managing money well.

    / / Oct 31, 2014 at 3:02 PM
  • Grover

    Abortion, Antonin Scalia, Books, Football, Law Schools, Non-Sequiturs, Trademarks

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.30.14

    * Using children’s books to describe the legal academy. It also works for law firms. Like The Monster at the End of This Book (affiliate link), about an associate who fears and reviles an overbearing partner and then learns (about 8 years in) that they’ve had the monster within them all along. [lawprofblawg]

    * In advance of its showdown before the Supreme Court, UPS changes its policy, but denies wrongdoing. [Redline]

    * I’ve never been called a Greek Chorus before. I like it. [Law and More]

    * Reproductive & Sexual Health and Justice senior legal analysts Imani Gandy and Jessica Mason Pieklo discuss both voting rights and abortion access in Texas with political reporter Andrea Grimes. [RH Reality Check]

    * Op-ed notes that Obamacare opponents are cherry-picking their history. Are there actually Obamacare opponents left? [Washington Post]

    * A week or so ago I made a joke about OSU Coach Mike “I’m a Man! I’m 40!” Gundy. Apparently he tried to trademark it. [Campus Insiders]

    * LFC360 chats with Bentham IMF’s Ralph Sutton about making Biglaw more affordable with third-party litigation funding. [LFC360]

    * A list of the top 100 Wild Men and Wild Women in history. Justice Scalia, Racehorse Haynes and David Boies all make the list. I get why he went with Haynes, but when it comes to a Texas litigation “wild man,” I think Joe Jamail. [What About Clients?]

    7 Comments / / Oct 30, 2014 at 5:15 PM
  • Supreme Court justices RF SCOTUS group portrait

    Books, Clarence Thomas, Clerkships, Federal Judges, Law Schools, Samuel Alito, SCOTUS, Sonia Sotomayor, Supreme Court

    An Afternoon With Three Supreme Court Justices

    Over the weekend, Justice Thomas, Justice Alito, and Justice Sotomayor participated in an extraordinary joint interview at their alma mater, Yale Law School.

    9 Comments / / Oct 27, 2014 at 5:03 PM
  • Gilberto Valle: Your new law school classmate?

    Bankruptcy, Biglaw, Books, Crime, Football, Kids, Law Schools, Libraries / Librarians, Money, Morning Docket, State Judges, State Judges Are Clowns

    Morning Docket: 10.23.14

    * Everyone knows Bingham McCutchen is considering a merger with Morgan Lewis, but not many know bankruptcy may be an option. It’s a remote option, but still an option. [Boston Globe]

    * When Kaye Scholer moved offices, it left behind most of its library. “It tells you everything you need to know about law firm libraries”: they’re not necessary. [New York Times]

    * Everyone loves the Sixth Amendment: Thanks to money from Koch Industries, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers will offer better indigent defense training. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * The judge in Adrian Peterson’s case won’t be replaced, despite the fact that he called the lawyers involved in the case “media whores.” Meh, Peterson’s attorney says he’s been called worse. [Bloomberg]

    * Gilberto Valle, better known as the “Cannibal Cop,” really wants to go to law school. He’s apparently scored quite well on LSAT practice tests. Do law school ladies look delicious or what? [New York Post]

    9 Comments / / Oct 23, 2014 at 9:02 AM
  • law_school1-e13663075495591-RF

    Books, Non-Sequiturs, Sexual Harassment, Trademarks

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.15.14

    * Looks like someone took a lesson from ATL’s Worst Law School bracket and put out a Worst Colleges in America list. We provide a very important service. [NPR]

    * Converse is suing over 31 alleged Chuck Taylor imitators. Are they mounting a “full court press”? Get it? Yeah there was pretty much no way around that one. [Fashionista]

    * Lawsuit reveals that struggling business couldn’t keep stores open but could shell out to keep CEO in her 4,560-square-foot home. [Seattle Times]

    * Harvard Law faculty members join a statement protesting the university’s new sexual harassment policy. [Boston Globe]

    * Is a sheath dress acceptable interview attire? Asking for a friend. [Corporette]

    * An interesting review of Lat’s upcoming novel Supreme Ambitions viewing the characters through the lens of William Deresiewicz’s Excellent Sheep (affiliate links) [Huffington Post Books]

    * Which is more galling? That the magistrate tried to weasel out of performing a legal same-sex marriage or that the newspaper felt this worthy of a poll? [The Virginian-Pilot (Hampton Roads)]

    5 Comments / / Oct 15, 2014 at 4:45 PM
  • law book

    Books, Caption Contests, Contests, Law Schools, Pictures, Vicious Infighting

    Caption Contest Winner: Wherein Law Students Fight Over Politically Incorrect Margin Notes

    This just goes to show that law students will fight over just about anything.

    1 Comment / / Oct 14, 2014 at 3:45 PM
  • Scott Turow RF

    Books, Crime, Jeffrey Toobin, Murder, New Yorker, Quote of the Day, Scott Turow

    A Prosecutor’s Perspective

    What did Scott Turow's time as a prosecutor teach him?

    5 Comments / / Oct 13, 2014 at 3:08 PM
  • law book

  • same-sex bride cake

    9th Circuit, Books, Federal Circuit, Gay Marriage, Hair, Non-Sequiturs, Sex, Supreme Court

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.08.14

    * Some marriage equality enthusiasts applauded the Supreme Court’s decision to stay out of the way and let the circuits do their thing. But the history of miscegenation in America suggests the Supreme Court had a moral obligation to interject. [USA Today]

    * On this subject, Professor Dorf presents a fascinating hypothetical: is it in the strategic interest of an anti-gay marriage conservative lower court judge to strike down same-sex marriage bans in light of the Supreme Court’s cert denials? [Dorf on Law]

    * One more story while we’re at it, after the Ninth Circuit struck down bans on same-sex marriages, District Judge Robert C. Jones of Nevada, who upheld the ban in the first place, recused himself rather that be forced to issue an opinion in accordance with Ninth Circuit precedent. [BuzzFeed]

    * If you’ve ever wondered how Islamic State manages to recruit Western youth to the cause, the answer is a “Disney-like” social media campaign. It’s like a Biglaw summer program, but for murder. [Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy]

    * “Better Hold Off Sexting With High School Students” in Indiana. The Indiana Supreme Court finally weighed in last week after the lower court had okayed a teacher texting a 16-year-old to sneak out of the house for sex. Wait, this required the Supreme Court to weigh in? What is wrong with you Indiana? [Valpo Law Blog]

    * Looking professional with a pixie cut. [Corporette]

    * Enter for a chance to win a Chief Judge Randall Rader bobblehead! Yes, these exist. [Santa Clara Law]

    * The Zephyr Teachout book tour for Corruption in America (affiliate link) begins. Is your town on the list? [Teachout-Wu]

    * New Orleans taxpayers spent around $75K traveling judges to conferences and resorts last year. Quoth the tipster: “I could make a joke about New Orleans judges going to the third world to learn how to run their courtrooms, but I think I already did.” [The Times-Picayune]

    8 Comments / / Oct 8, 2014 at 5:03 PM
  • Sonia Sotomayor

    Antonin Scalia, Books, Fabulosity, Parties, SCOTUS, Sonia Sotomayor, Supreme Court

    Scalia On Sotomayor: ‘I Knew She’d Be Trouble’

    Did the Wise Latina engage in unwise behavior at a Supreme Court party?

    11 Comments / / Oct 8, 2014 at 1:28 PM
  • Bluebook small Legal Bluebook Uniform System of Citation

    Books, Copyright, Intellectual Property, Law Professors, Law Reviews, Law Schools

    Is The Bluebook About To Be Killed Off?

    What kind of silver bullet could kill this venerable institution?

    38 Comments / / Oct 7, 2014 at 5:35 PM
  • law book

  • Once upon a time

    Books, In-House Counsel, Litigators

    Proof That The Internet Did Not Destroy The Ability To Write

    What is the secret to good writing?

    16 Comments / / Oct 6, 2014 at 12:17 PM
  • Justice Antonin Scalia

    Antonin Scalia, Biglaw, Books, Boutique Law Firms, Crime, Department of Justice, Immigration, Mergers and Acquisitions, Morning Docket, Pro Bono, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 10.02.14

    * Justice Scalia spoke at CU-Boulder last night. For his sake, we certainly hope he didn’t speak about any issues that might someday appear before SCOTUS, lest he be asked to recuse. [Boulder Daily Camera via How Appealing]

    * Another one bites the dust over at Main Justice: David O’Neil, the head of the criminal division, is stepping down in the wake of the BNP Paribas case, and will likely have many white-shoe law firm suitors. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * Fox Rothschild picked up a 18-lawyer boutique firm in Texas, which will serve as the home of its first outpost in the Lone Star State. Energy law, surprisingly, wasn’t the driving factor. [Legal Intelligencer]

    * “I have a heart and I have two kids.” That’s a pretty damn good reason for Biglaw attorneys to take a break from their corporate billable hours to represent undocumented children pro bono. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Scott Greenfield reviews Lat’s forthcoming novel, Supreme Ambitions (affiliate link). Of course, in SHG style, it contains a spoiler. Try to skip that clearly marked paragraph. [Simple Justice]

    4 Comments / / Oct 2, 2014 at 9:10 AM

Our Sites

  • Above the Law
  • How Appealing
  • ATL Redline
  • Breaking Defense
  • Breaking Energy
  • Breaking Gov
  • Dealbreaker
  • Fashonista
  •