China

  • confused lawyer two phones

    China, International Law

    China Due Diligence? Good Luck With That…

    How do you do get information on a Chinese company when certain private investigatory work in China is illegal?

    19 Comments / / Apr 7, 2014 at 10:07 AM
  • confused lawyer

    China, Contracts, International Law

    Suing Chinese Companies In The United States Is Usually A Waste Of Time

    What’s the problem? China does not enforce U.S. court judgments.

    10 Comments / / Mar 31, 2014 at 10:13 AM
  • rooster

    China, Contracts, International Law

    How To Do Business In China Without Jail Time? Kill A Chicken

    China belongs to the Chinese, and they do not particularly want foreigners there. How can you practice law in such an environment? Very carefully.

    13 Comments / / Mar 26, 2014 at 10:01 AM
  • Made In China

    China, Contracts, Depositions, Insurance, International Law

    How To Prevent ‘Made In China’ Product Labels From Leading To Lawsuits Made In The U.S.A.

    How often do you stop to think about the ubiquitous “Made in China” label? Not as often as you should.

    6 Comments / / Mar 24, 2014 at 10:19 AM
  • chinese-law_0

    China, International Law

    China Law Mistakes To Avoid — I’m Talking To You

    What causes American lawyers to make mistakes when dealing with China law? Find out here.

    14 Comments / / Mar 10, 2014 at 10:17 AM
  • Spoiled_brat_selfish_parent_child_beg_thumb

    China, Law Professors, Law Schools, Non-Sequiturs, Sentencing Law, Trademarks, United Kingdom / Great Britain

    Non-Sequiturs: 12.11.13

    * Beware of “affluenza” — the condition where rich kids believe that their wealth shields them from consequences. One kid with affluenza was convicted of four counts of manslaughter and got… probation. Great way to teach him that there are consequences. I don’t doubt being a hyper-privileged douche contributed to his criminal behavior, but let’s see if the judge is equally lenient to the next kid in this courtroom who argues that poverty contributed to his crimes. [Gawker]

    * In America people complain about law reviews sharing outlines for free. In the U.K., they’re selling notes on eBay. If you’re buying notes off the Internet, perhaps law school isn’t your bag. [Legal Cheek]

    * Do Twitter mentions reflect the scholarly significance of a professor’s articles? No. [TaxProf Blog]

    * Here’s some terrifying stuff that lawyers want for Christmas. It’s not quite our gift guide. [The Spark File]

    * The word “spin” is apparently trademarked. This is the company that did it and enforces its trademark against gyms with uncertified spin classes. [Racked]

    * Law school applications are in free fall. Too bad all these people are going to miss out on that sweet $1 million law degree. [Lawyers, Guns & Money]

    * Mental health remains a seriously undiscussed problem in the legal industry. [Law and More]

    * TSA now confiscating prop guns off stuffed animals. [Lowering the Bar]

    * A Chinese law professor lost his job for writing an article advocating constitutional rule. If you think this is a harsh response, remember this government used to throw tanks at people over less. [Washington Post]

    * Speaking of China, next month the CBLA is hosting a panel discussion about the expanded use of the FCPA, specifically with regard to China. [CBLA]

    4 Comments / / Dec 11, 2013 at 6:04 PM
  • Sleeping with Documents

    American Bar Association / ABA, Banking Law, Biglaw, China, Contract Attorneys, Crime, Document Review, Job Searches, Law Schools, Lawyerly Lairs, Morning Docket, Partner Issues, Public Interest, Real Estate, Sex Scandals, Wall Street

    Morning Docket: 12.10.13

    * Stan Stallworth, the Sidley partner accused of sexual assault, has hired a prominent criminal defense attorney to represent him in the case while the firm stands by its man. [Am Law Daily]

    * Wall Street regulators are considering approval of a formidable version of the Volcker Rule that would ban banks from proprietary trading. Voting occurs later today. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * Skadden Arps has asked a judge to toss an FLSA lawsuit filed against the firm by one of its document reviewers. Aww, silly contract attorney — there’s no way you’re getting overtime pay. [Law360 (sub. req.)]

    * Weil Gotshal is still leaking like a sieve. This time, Bruce Colbath, a partner from the firm’s New York office, defected to the Antitrust and Trade Regulation practice group at Sheppard Mullin. [Market Wired]

    * Lawyerly Lairs, China Edition: Raymond Li, chair of the Greater China practice at Paul Hastings, just purchased a townhouse for about $95 million. He paid for it in straight cash, homie. [Wall Street Journal]

    * They’re extremely tardy to the party, but if the ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar gets its way, law schools will be subject to random audits of their employment stats. [ABA Journal]

    * It’s a tough job that “can really beat you down,” but an organization called Gideon’s Promise just made it a whole lot easier for law students to secure jobs as public defenders in the South. [National Law Journal]

    14 Comments / / Dec 10, 2013 at 9:04 AM
  • Copy - Paste concept on modern aluminum keyboard.

    China, Law Professors, Law Schools, Wikipedia

    T14 Law Professor Wildly Plagiarized Wikipedia In Expert Report, Say Defense Lawyers

    The fight of an expert report turns ugly when the defense charges that a prestigious law professor lifted large sections off Wikipedia.

    15 Comments / / Nov 25, 2013 at 12:17 PM
  • maggie-gyllenhaal-secretary-crawl

    Baseball, China, Clerkships, Craigslist, Janice Rogers Brown, Law Schools, Non-Sequiturs, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Texas

    Non-Sequiturs: 08.09.13

    * This gem of a listing just showed up in the “legal/paralegal jobs” section of Craigslist. Be sure to send a “nude picture” with your résumé! Perhaps someone has been watching too many Maggie Gyllenhaal films. If it gets taken down a screenshot is here, and the klassy alternative picture in the listing is here. [Craigslist]

    * From the “no good deed goes unpunished” department, Georgetown Law has figured out how to bilk taxpayers into covering the costs of increasing tuition. The federal government forgives law school debt for those in the public sector if they agree to make an income-based payment. Georgetown is covering those costs, passing it on to future students (who also won’t be paying it back), and then encouraging students to shelter income to guarantee the school comes out ahead. This is why we can’t have nice things. [Wonkblog / Washington Post]

    * The always outspoken Judge Kopf shares his thoughts on Shon Hopwood’s selection as a clerk for Judge Janice Rogers Brown. Judge Kopf sentenced Hopwood to 147 months in the 90s. [Hercules and the Umpire]

    * A delightful “man bites dog” story: a bank didn’t read a customer’s amendments to a credit card application before issuing him a card and went to court whining about how hard it is to pay attention to the fine print. Boo hoo hoo. [The Telegraph]

    * How to deal with your mistakes. This only applies to associates, though. Partners have two steps: (1) find an associate; (2) blame the associate. [Associate’s Mind]

    * Everything’s bigger in Texas, including their misreading of the Supreme Court’s precedent. [Election Law Blog]

    * China is way serious about prosecuting corruption. [Legal Juice]

    * The Mets muscle man whose comic inability to open a water bottle went viral on YouTube is actually a lawyer from White Plains. If you haven’t seen the clip yet, it’s after the jump. Watching the water bottle battle is the only excuse for subjecting yourself to a Royals-Mets game…

    19 Comments / / Aug 9, 2013 at 5:04 PM
  • time is money

    Biglaw, Billable Hours, China, Ho-Love

    New Punctuality Rules Give Law Firm A Totalitarian Feel

    We didn’t know law firms were taking attendance now….

    34 Comments / / Jan 3, 2013 at 11:30 AM
  • DVF: 'You must be kidding me.'

    2nd Circuit, Blogging, China, Fashion, Federal Judges, Intellectual Property, Law School Deans, Law Schools, Money, Morning Docket, Patents, S.D.N.Y., Wall Street

    Morning Docket: 12.13.12

    * “This is a total victory not just for the C.F.T.C., but also for financial reform.” Regulators, mount up, because you basically just got a free pass to do your jobs and keep a more watchful and vigilant eye on Wall Street. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * Last year, China officially surpassed the United States in terms of the number of patent applications filed. China’s probably surpassed the United States in terms of patents infringed, but that’s neither here nor there. [National Law Journal]

    * And now we see why St. Louis University School of Law’s interim dean said he’d be donating his salary to the school. He’s no “butt boy” — he’s settled $25M worth of cases since the fall. [Madison-St. Clair Record]

    * “Help me, I’m poor”: the Huffington Post’s army of unpaid bloggers will continue to be unpaid, because the Second Circuit recently affirmed the S.D.N.Y.’s decision to toss out their case. [WSJ Law Blog (sub. req.)]

    * Diane von Furstenberg, the fashion designer behind luxury brand DVF, is suing an ex-distributor for selling her wares on the cheap to the likes of TJ Maxx and Marshalls. Ugh, cringe… that’s très déclassé. [Bloomberg]

    0 Comments / / Dec 13, 2012 at 9:08 AM
  • bride holding a bouquet

    2nd Circuit, ACLU, Biglaw, China, Insider Trading, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Prisons, Religion, Sentencing Law, Solo Practitioners, State Judges, State Judges Are Clowns, Student Loans, Weddings

    Morning Docket: 12.05.12

    * Mirror, mirror, on the wall, which is the fairest firm of them all? According to the 2012 Acritas Brand Index survey, the current leader of the Global 100 is the most powerful Biglaw brand for the fifth year in a row. [American Lawyer]

    * But that might not last for long, considering the dilemma Baker & McKenzie is facing when it comes to joining the Shanghai Bar Association in China. The firm is one of the first to indicate that it’ll take the plunge. [Wall Street Journal]

    * Thanks to the Second Circuit, Rajat Gupta will be a free man on bail pending the appeal of his insider trading conviction. We wonder what Benula Bensam would have to say about this new twist. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * Jason Smiekel, the lawyer who pleaded guilty in a murder-for-hire plot involving a former client, was sentenced to eight and a half years in federal prison. The things men will do for HHHBs. [Chicago Tribune]

    * Student loan payments: coming to a paycheck deduction near you! Congress is considering an overhaul of the country’s student debt collection practices, and Rep. Tom Petri has some interesting ideas. [Bloomberg]

    * The Cleveland-Marshall College of Law is the latest school to hop aboard the solo practice incubator train, but graduates will have to rent their office space from the school. Nice. /sarcasm [National Law Journal]

    * “We didn’t file this complaint lightly.” Sorry, Judge Norman, but as it turns out, you can’t just sentence a teenager to attend church for 10 years as a condition of parole without pissing off the ACLU. [Tulsa World]

    * When your alterations cost more than your wedding gown, it’s pretty much a given that you’ll have some problems — ones worth suing over, if you’re a true bridezilla (like moi). [Thomson Reuters News & Insight]

    3 Comments / / Dec 5, 2012 at 9:07 AM
  • shoes RF

    Celebrities, China, Fashion, Fashion Is Fun, Shoes

    Fashion Law & Order: Hand Over the Cash, or Risk Kidnapping Over Peep-Toes

    Would you take hostages over a pair of shoes? That’s apparently what’s happening in China, and it’s all Wendy Williams’s fault.

    2 Comments / / Nov 27, 2012 at 3:22 PM
  • drinking

    Barack Obama, China, Election 2012, Morning Docket, Police, SCOTUS, Videos, Violence

    Morning Docket: 10.16.12

    * Check out the absurd rules governing tonight’s presidential debate. Should make for some awesome boring-as-hell television. And yes, of course the rules document was signed by lawyers. [Gawker]

    * Chinese politics is starting to adversely affect American law firms. Next thing you know, attorneys will be hiding out in the woods, drinking deer blood. Oh wait, that kind of already happened. [Asian Lawyer]

    * Despite the passage of time, mentioning torture at a Guantanamo hearing is still about as awkward as… some generic Family Guy-style non sequitur. [Thomson Reuters News and Insight]

    * This is a newly released video of NYPD kicking the ever-loving sh*t out of a homeless man, who was inexplicably charged with assaulting the officer who, again, beat him up on video. Inside a synagogue. Where the man was sleeping. With permission. Can’t wait to see the lawsuit that comes out of this. [Gothamist]

    * SCOTUS has agreed to review the Arizona voter ID law. Oh goodie. [WSJ Law Blog]

    10 Comments / / Oct 16, 2012 at 9:15 AM
  • pay-up

    Antonin Scalia, California, China, Gay Marriage, Kids, Non-Sequiturs, Tax Law

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.01.12

    * This San Francisco attorney had a nice visit to the up-and-coming superpower across the Pacific. And by “nice,” I mean the Chinese tried to kill him and the U.S. State Department made things worse. [San Francisco Chronicle]

    * I’m sure there’s some sort of serious social commentary here about how gay marriage is good or bad, but I can’t figure out what it would be. Either way, this poor kid has had quite the rough go of it. [Althouse]

    * Monster Energy Drinks are under investigation from an as-yet unnamed state attorney general. Because apparently some people were unaware that drinking something that looks like liquid uranium may be unhealthy. [About Lawsuits]

    * The suspect in this multimillion-dollar scam graduated from Harvard Law in 1972. You stay classy, Cambridge. [ABC]

    * Glenn Reynolds explains why everyone just needs to suck it up and pay income taxes. [Instapundit]

    * Justice Scalia is interviewed again about his new book. Shockingly, no one took any shots at Judge Posner this time! [LA Review of Books]

    2 Comments / / Oct 1, 2012 at 6:12 PM
  • moe

    China, Money, Pictures

    Infographic of the Day: Which Country Has the Highest Paid Lawyers?

    How much do American lawyers get paid compared to lawyers in other parts of the world?

    39 Comments / / Sep 20, 2012 at 12:04 PM
  • Body double

    China, Crime, Prisons, Sentencing Law

    Could You Get A Body Double To Serve Your Time? In China The Answer Is Yes.

    In China, using body doubles as stand ins during criminal proceedings is a real thing…

    37 Comments / / Aug 3, 2012 at 11:21 AM
  • Blech.

    China, Fashion, Non-Sequiturs, Police, Trials, Women's Issues

    Non-Sequiturs: 07.13.12

    * A manager at a Long Island-based national women’s organization has been sued by her female coworkers for allegedly being too grabby and being “obsessed with butts.” Not sure what to think about the lawsuit, but you can’t really complain about the photo of the manager motorboating her (also female) friend included with the story. [New York Post]

    * The organizers of the London Olympics are concerned about getting hacked. So like any smart business, they employed a legion of hackers (pardon me, “ethical hackers”) to protect their systems. [IT-Lex]

    * In other Olympic news, Congress is PO’d that the American Olympic team uniforms were made in China. As Glenn Reynolds at Instapundit points out, though, the real problem is that they are ugly as hell. [Christian Science Monitor via Instapundit]

    * George Zimmerman wants another new judge because he claims this one is “prejudiced against him.” Sorry, but judges aren’t like Magic cards, you can’t continue to trade up. [Big Story / Associated Press]

    * You gotta fight / for your right / to flip the bird at the 5-0. (That said, assuming you have said right, it doesn’t make it a good idea.) [New York Magazine]

    * Are lawyers also doctors? In the words of Dr. Evil, “How ’bout no, Scott.” [Adjunct Law Prof Blog]

    * Handbags at dawn: can’t get enough of the Gucci v. Guess case? Take a look at some comprehensive analysis on this fashion law showdown. [Law of Fashion]

    * A state judge in Pennsylvania ruled that discovery of private content on Facebook is only “minimally intrusive.” In other words, if you still hadn’t heard, the “private” stuff you put on Facebook is really anything but. [CPR Law Blog]

    It’s Friday, and I’m going camping for the weekend. After the jump, check out a video of where I’m going….

    Oh crap, I forgot what day it is today. I hope my trip actually doesn’t end up like this. God forbid it does, I will never need a lawyer again. I’ll just need an undertaker.

    9 Comments / / Jul 13, 2012 at 5:02 PM

Our Sites

  • Above the Law
  • How Appealing
  • ATL Redline
  • Breaking Defense
  • Breaking Energy
  • Breaking Gov
  • Dealbreaker
  • Fashonista
  •