Election Law

  • Classical ballot

    Election Law

    Drawing Straws Isn’t A Dumb Way To Win An Election, Democracy Is.

    Do you have a better idea than Mississippi’s?

    0 Comments / / Nov 23, 2015 at 5:26 PM
  • John Oliver LF

    Election Law, Television

    John Oliver Takes On Voter Disenfranchisement

    Oliver talks about the bizarre legal quandary of Washington, D.C.

    98 Comments / / Aug 3, 2015 at 11:37 AM
  • Anthony_Kennedy_official_SCOTUS_portrait_crop

    Election Law

    One Robe, One Vote

    Does the Roberts Court like voters?

    0 Comments / / Jul 12, 2015 at 3:19 PM
  • Jeb Bush  (Photo by Bill Pugliano/Getty Images)

    Election Law, Politics

    Is Jeb Bush Running For President, Or Just Crapping On Election Law?

    Is this would-be presidential candidate breaking the law?

    23 Comments / / Jun 3, 2015 at 1:00 PM
  • Election Law Politics Voting

    Election Law, Politics, Public Interest

    The Plight Of The Municipal Lawyer At Election Time

    Please welcome new columnist Sam Wright (not his real name), who will be covering the world of public interest law.

    8 Comments / / Dec 2, 2014 at 1:59 PM
  • Ballot Box

    Election Law, Politics, State Judges

    Judge Loses Election, Vows To Ignore Result

    Electing judges creates a messy system. And it’s messier when one of the judges doesn’t believe in the process.

    18 Comments / / Nov 10, 2014 at 11:01 AM
  • Voting

    Election Law, Politics

    The Verdict: Ballot Measures

    Here are the most interesting under-reported ballot measures this Election Day

    14 Comments / / Nov 4, 2014 at 4:52 PM
  • passport US passport

    Courthouses, D.C. Circuit, Department of Justice, Election Law, Environment / Environmental Law, Non-Sequiturs, Politics, Privacy, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Technology

    Non-Sequiturs: 11.03.14

    * Floridian women lawyers got their wish: Bad Judge, plagued by bad ratings, is getting canceled. [Daily Business Review]

    * A round-up of write-ups about today’s oral arguments in the Israel / Jerusalem passport case. [How Appealing]

    * Interesting reflections from Professor Glenn Reynolds on the controversial catcalling video.
    [USA Today via Instapundit]

    * Things are bats**t insane — literally — at this Utah courthouse. [Gawker]

    * The D.C. Circuit gives the EPA its way on cross-state air pollution. [Breaking Energy]

    * Election monitors from the Justice Department: possibly coming to a jurisdiction near you (including Bergen County, New Jersey, where I grew up). [BuzzFeed]

    * Can cops force suspects to use their fingerprints to unlock their cellphones? Eric Crusius and Lisa Giovinazzo debate, after the jump. [Fox News]

    11 Comments / / Nov 3, 2014 at 4:32 PM
  • Supreme Court Justice Seamus McCaffrey

    DUI / DWI, Election Law, Law Schools, Non-Sequiturs, Pornography, Pro Se Litigants, State Judges, Television, Trademarks

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.27.14

    * After being temporarily suspended as part of “Porngate” for trafficking in “highly demeaning portrayals of members of various segments of the population, including women, elderly persons, and uniformed school girls,” Seamus McCaffrey retires from the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. [Philadelphia Daily News]

    * A group of women lawyers in Miami has called for NBC to cancel Bad Judge because it “depicts a female judge as unethical, lazy, crude, hyper-sexualized, and unfit to hold such an esteemed position of power.” Indeed there’s no place for depicting women judges that way on TV. Especially when Miami is perfectly capable of depicting them that way in real life. [Crushable]

    * Epic trademark infringement. [Legal Cheek]

    * Crazy pro se guy slapped down in Canada. [Lowering the Bar]

    * While almost everyone else is seeing lower applications, USC Law saw a 5 percent bump. [USC Gould School of Law]

    * Stanford and Dartmouth in hot water over election law charges in Montana. Apparently piercing the imaginary veil of non-partisanship in judicial elections is the problem and not the whole idea of judicial elections in the first place. [Montana Standard]

    5 Comments / / Oct 27, 2014 at 4:36 PM
  • 220px-Eric_Holder_official_portrait

    11th Circuit, Copyright, Department of Justice, Election Law, Fashion, Law Reviews, Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.20.14

    * Eric Holder gave millions to Nazis! Or at least that’s how Darrell Issa will put it. But seriously, the Department of Justice has a long-standing policy of allowing Nazi war criminals to collect Social Security payments if they agree to get the hell out of the U.S. [Associated Press via New Europe]

    * A Cleveland attorney, Peter Pattakos, is not worried about contracting Ebola, even though he was in a room with a current Ebola patient, because Pattakos is neither a crazy person nor a cable news producer and realizes that he never exchanged bodily fluids with the patient. As he points out, “I’m much more likely to be mistakenly killed by a police officer in this country than to be killed by Ebola, even if you were in the same bridal shop.” [Cleveland.com]

    * Chanel is suing What About Yves for trademark infringement. The question Professor Colman asks is whether “we really want a trademark ‘protection’ regime in which mark ‘owners’ can prevent creative, non-confusing uses of ‘their property.’” [Law of Fashion]

    * One for the career alternatives file: Miami lawyer who ranks local restaurants opens his own restaurant. At ATL we rank law schools, maybe we should open our own law school. [Southern District of Florida Blog]

    * Academic publishers fighting the war on common sense by charging an arm and a leg for access to research that is written and peer reviewed by other people for free scored a victory on Friday when the Eleventh Circuit rejected the lower court’s articulation of educational fair use in the digital age. [The Chronicle of Higher Education]

    * Balancing parenthood and the “jealous mistress” that is the practice of law. [Jed Cain]

    * An amazing symposium on campaign finance reform from the NYU Law Review and the Brennan Center for Justice. It’s a wealth of content. [NYU Law Review]

    * Josh Gilliland from The Legal Geeks gave a presentation on Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and the Law at the San Diego Comic Fest, which sounds much more fun than any “and the Law” class I ever took. He’s provided his slideshow presentation…

    8 Comments / / Oct 20, 2014 at 4:58 PM
  • LSAT scantron

    Department of Justice, Disasters / Emergencies, Election Law, General Counsel, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Prisons, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Texas, Trials

    Morning Docket: 10.20.14

    * The Supreme Court is allowing Texas to enforce its strict voter identification law during the upcoming election, but Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, hero to the masses, wrote a rather scathing dissent in opposition. [New York Times]

    * Michael Millikin, GM’s beleaguered GC, will be stepping down from his position while the Justice Department continues its probe into the company’s fatal ignition switch failures. A replacement has not yet been named. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Baltimore Law and Maryland’s HBCUs hooked up to assist underrepresented minorities get into law school. Full scholarships come with GPAs of at least 3.5 and LSAT scores of at least 152. [USA Today]

    * Kent Easter, the lawyer who was convicted for planting drugs in a school volunteer’s car, was sentenced to serve six months in jail. His law license will likely be suspended (just like his wife’s was). [OC Weekly]

    * Accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev isn’t doing well in court, and his trial hasn’t even started yet. Motions to dismiss his case and to suppress evidence were denied. [National Law Journal]

    39 Comments / / Oct 20, 2014 at 9:12 AM
  • Amal Clooney

    5th Circuit, Abortion, Biglaw, Celebrities, Crime, Election Law, Eric Holder, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Student Loans, Texas, U.S. Attorneys Offices, United Kingdom / Great Britain, Weddings

    Morning Docket: 10.15.14

    * The Fifth Circuit is allowing the Texas voter ID law to be enforced during the upcoming election, even though it was recently struck down by a federal judge. After all, “preserving the status quo” is very important down south. [Bloomberg]

    * We suppose that’s why the Supreme Court stepped in to make sure that abortion clinics in Texas were allowed to reopen following their shut down. Take that, Fifth Circuit. [New York Times]

    * AG Eric Holder is showing off some fancy legal footwork before he walks out the door. Federal prosecutors can no longer ask defendants to waive their IAC claims when pleading guilty. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Davis Polk & Wardwell is a Biglaw firm where hotties roam, and it looks like this top Justice Department prosecutor who started his career there is returning home there to roost. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * It’s the debt: With headlines like “Law school applications plummet – at U of L too,” the University of Louisville School of Law can’t even convince alums from its undergrad school to attend. [Courier-Journal]

    * Amal Alamuddin changed her name to Amal Clooney on her firm’s website. It’s as if she wants to rub the fact that she’s a human rights lawyer who just got married in everyone’s face. [New York Daily News]

    30 Comments / / Oct 15, 2014 at 9:08 AM
  • Carmelo Anthony

    Election Law, Non-Sequiturs, SCOTUS, Sports, Supreme Court, Wall Street

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.03.14

    * Apparently, heckling Carmelo Anthony can cost you your job. [Dealbreaker]

    * There’s nothing the Supreme Court can do to stop cops who want to take a long time to release you from a stop, even if the Court wants to. [Simple Justice]

    * I think we should just ask John Roberts to tell every state precisely how they are allowed to discriminate against black voters and be done with it. Just tell us the rules so we can start the GOTV campaigns. [Election Law Blog]

    * Former Manhattan Assemblywoman Gabriela Rosa gets a year in jail for purchasing a sham marriage to gain citizenship. The “for citizenship” part is what got her, because lots of politicians are in sham marriages. [Journal News]

    * Judge Frank Easterbrook thinks that the new proposed length limit for appellate briefs is too short. Verbose litigators everywhere, rejoice. [How Appealing]

    * I thought “spoofing” was bad for the market, but Matt Levine says cracking down on spoofing “helps” high-frequency traders, who I also think are bad for the market. You know why I’m not an SEC lawyer? Prosecuting people based on them being “bad” becomes untenable when everybody involved is rich. [Bloomberg View]

    24 Comments / / Oct 3, 2014 at 4:04 PM
  • Voting rights

    Election Law, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    Why Do Conservative Justices Hate Voters?

    Restricting voting rights is the wrong side of history

    149 Comments / / Sep 30, 2014 at 3:05 PM
  • Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

  • She's not a porn star, she's a law student.

    Biglaw, Election Law, Eric Holder, Law Firm Mergers, Law School Deans, Law Schools, Money, Morning Docket, Partner Issues, Politics, Pornography, State Judges, State Judges Are Clowns

    Morning Docket: 09.29.14

    * Now that we know Eric Holder is resigning, there’s been speculation as to where he’ll go next. The obvious choice is a return to Covington & Burling, but he could still surprise everyone. [National Law Journal]

    * “Judicial campaign cash is burning a hole in the Constitution.” State court judges are pumping money into their election campaigns, and some have been left to wonder about its true price. [New York Times]

    * Details have emerged as to conditions that must be met for Bingham McCutchen’s proposed merger with Morgan Lewis: partner promises, de-equitizations, and forgivable loans, oh my! [Reuters (sub. req.)]

    * In the wake of Dean Makau Mutua’s decision to step down at Buffalo Law, a “deep rift” among faculty has been brought to light. The school’s future doesn’t seem as “bright” as we were one told. [Buffalo News]

    * A former law student who was falsely identified as a porn star on the radio had her day in court and pulled out a win. Here’s the money shot: she’s walking away with $1 million in damages. [Kansas City Star]

    5 Comments / / Sep 29, 2014 at 9:05 AM
  • Dinesh D'Souza

    Bankruptcy, Biglaw, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Dreier, Election Law, International Law, Law Schools, Morning Docket

    Morning Docket: 09.24.14

    * The United States is launching air strikes against ISIS in Syria and Iraq, but some have been compelled to wonder whether it’s legal under international law. Of course it’s legal, under the Rule of ‘MERICA, F*CK YEAH! [BBC]

    * Dewey know whether this failed firm’s former COO can get out of paying $9.3M to its bankruptcy trustee? Dewey know whether we’ll ever be able to stop using this pun? Sadly, the answer to both questions is no. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Marc Dreier of the defunct Dreier LLP has been ordered to testify in person in his firm’s bankruptcy case in Manhattan, but he’d rather stay in the comforts of his prison home in Minnesota. Aww. [Bloomberg]

    * Dinesh D’Souza won’t have to do hard prison time for his campaign-finance violations. Instead, he’ll be spending eight months in a “community confinement center,” which sounds just peachy. [New York Times]

    * Northwestern Law is launching a campaign to fundraise $150M to be spent on an endless supply of Chick-fil-A sandwiches financial aid for students and curriculum improvements. [National Law Journal]

    3 Comments / / Sep 24, 2014 at 9:01 AM
  • Bill of rights 2

    Constitutional Law, Drinking, Election Law, Politics, Women's Issues

    Constitution Day Special: Our Favorite Unheralded Amendments

    Above the Law’s favorite Amendments that nobody ever talks about.

    47 Comments / / Sep 17, 2014 at 5:27 PM