FCC

  • angry woman with phone

    FCC, Federal Government, Privacy, Technology

    FCC Clarifies (?) TCPA Autodialing Requirements

    Take-home message: Do as we say, NOT as we do!

    / Aug 13, 2015 at 12:00 PM
  • Telephone wires

    Advertising, FCC, Federal Government, Privacy

    How Broadcasters Could Have Big Liability For Texts And Calls Under The FCC’s Recent Order On The Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA)

    The FCC recently issued a Declaratory Ruling and Order on the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) – and that order highlights many issues with broadcasters who use texts or outbound automated calls to the mobile devices of viewers and listeners.

    / Aug 13, 2015 at 10:00 AM
  • radio DJ

    FCC, Technology

    Radio Music License Committee Settles Antitrust Suit Against SESAC – What Does It Mean For The Radio Industry?

    Yesterday, it was announced that the Radio Music License Committee (RMLC) settled its lawsuit with SESAC.

    / Jul 30, 2015 at 4:30 PM
  • law technology legal tech computer laptop

    FCC, Federal Government

    A First Look At The FCC’s 2015 TCPA Declaratory Ruling And Order

    On July 10, 2015, the Federal Communications Commission (“FCC” or the “Commission”) released the text of its omnibus Declaratory Ruling and Order (“TCPA Declaratory Ruling and Order” or “Ruling”), which the Commission adopted by a 3-2 vote almost a month earlier, on June 18, 2015.

    / Jul 17, 2015 at 12:32 PM
  • Drone camera Small

    FCC, Federal Government, Privacy

    NTIA Schedules Drone Stakeholder Confabs

    NTIA steps up effort to develop consensus as to best practices for drone use.

    / Jul 17, 2015 at 10:00 AM
  • internet

    FCC, Technology

    Is The Internet “Not A Necessity Or Human Right”?

    Commissioner Michael O’Rielly (Federal Communication Commission – FCC) has been criticized for “commingling of the words “necessity” and “basic human right.”

    / Jul 10, 2015 at 4:00 PM
  • radio DJ

    FCC, Federal Government

    Restoring Vitality To The AM Revitalization Effort

    The radio industry has been waiting for the FCC to finally release its long-awaited AM revitalization order.

    / Jul 10, 2015 at 1:00 PM
  • Internet Bully

    Contracts, FCC, Money

    Open Internet Violation: Inadequate Disclosure Of AT&T’s Apparently Limited “Unlimited” Service Fetches $100,000,000 Fine

    Unprecedented fine for reducing data speeds in “unlimited” data plans (apparently) without adequate notice to consumers.

    / Jun 26, 2015 at 2:00 PM
  • iStock_000015611688_Small-300x199

    FCC, Federal Government

    Update: Pandora Cleared To Be Broadcast Licensee

    Terse compliance plan does the trick, although Pandora still has some hoops to jump through.

    / Jun 12, 2015 at 5:00 PM
  • net neutrality

    FCC, Federal Government, Technology

    The Net Neutrality Order Has Hit the Federal Register!

    Get your calendars out. It’s time to calculate the date by which petitions for judicial review of the FCC’s Open Internet Report and Order (R&O) must be filed.

    / Apr 17, 2015 at 4:17 PM
  • stat of the week image

    FCC, Federal Government

    Stats Of The Week: The Case Against Net Neutrality

    The telecom industry contends that the new FCC net neutrality rules will stifle innovation.

    19 Comments / / Feb 27, 2015 at 3:33 PM
  • Scalia Talking

    Antonin Scalia, Biglaw, FCC, Gender, Law Firm Mergers, Law Schools, LSAT, Money, Morning Docket, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Technology, Texas, Women's Issues

    Morning Docket: 11.12.14

    * With all this net neutrality talk, one of the biggest fans of the cause is Justice Antonin Scalia. He may not be tech-savvy, but he may yet save the internet. [National Law Journal]

    * And the partners rejoiced? Bingham McCutchen approved a Morgan Lewis merger, and now the firm waits for its valiant rescuer to ride in upon its trusty steed. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * A new study says the way to close the law school gender gap is to adopt gradeless grading policies similar to those of top law schools. Honors for everyone, yay! [Stanford News]

    * LSAT prep company Test Masters Educational Services Inc. — not to be confused with TestMasters — must pay about $927K in legal fees, because as it turns out, some people were confused. [Legal Times]

    * A Texas state representative submitted a bill calling for a new law school in the Rio Grande Valley because there aren’t enough lawyers there. Unemployed lawyers, you know what to do. [Action 4 News]

    7 Comments / / Nov 12, 2014 at 8:54 AM
  • football first and goal RF

    FCC, Federal Government

    FCC KO’s Sports Blackout Rules

    The clock is running down for the FCC’s sports blackout rules. The two-minute warning (actually, the 31-day warning) has been whistled.

    / Oct 27, 2014 at 11:31 AM
  • NFL_logo

    Biglaw, Contract Attorneys, Document Review, FCC, Football, Non-Sequiturs, Racism, Sexism, State Judges

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.24.14

    * NFL blackout rules will be a thing of the past on November 24. So just in time for all you rabid Rams fans to watch them play the Raiders. [CommLawBlog]

    * Electing judges is so very stupid. [What About Clients?]

    * OK, Alex Rich: it’s time to ditch document review and become a psychic. [Law and More]

    * A tumblr of offensive stuff overheard at Yale Law. If these are true, then that place sounds horrible. [The YLS Offensive]

    * Exactly where is the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge? It turns out the government doesn’t really even know. They’re looking to shift the border and possibly allow more oil drilling. [Breaking Energy]

    * How to get your Biglaw career right from the beginning. [Medium]

    10 Comments / / Oct 24, 2014 at 5:01 PM
  • Washington-Redskins-Helmet-2

    FCC, Federal Government

    Petitioner Wants FCC to Ref “Redskins” Debate

    Petition against a broadcast license renewal cites offensive nature of “Redskins” name as basis for denial. Should the FCC really be involved with this?

    / Oct 3, 2014 at 2:23 PM
  • Not courtroom attire.

    Document Review, FCC, Non-Sequiturs, Sports, Supreme Court

    Non-Sequiturs: 09.30.14

    * The world’s largest Harry Potter memorabilia collection belongs to a lawyer. His patronus is a shimmering gavel. [The Telegraph]

    * The FCC has ended the sports blackout rule. Expect the NFL to go bankrupt within days. [Politico]

    * No one expects to see “lawyer” on a Top 20 Work-Life Balance list, but there is one legal job out there coming in at number 11. [Glassdoor via Adjunct Law Prof Blog]

    * Want to expose the severe problems of the over-criminalization of everything? Everyone with a warrant turn themselves in on one day. Call it “Warrant Day.” See how the system copes logistically and financially when all those citations come home to roost all at once. [Street Roots]

    * Russia’s equivalent of Chief Justice Roberts advocates a return to serfdom. Now there’s an originalist! [Business Insider]

    * Bow Tie Law talks about the role of discovery software in the duty of lawyers to review documents. Because document review is “legal work” when it’s about paying people a livable wage and “computer work” when it isn’t. [The Everlaw Blog]

    * Before we get wrapped up in the cases the Supreme Court will decide, let’s remember all the cases it won’t decide. Because “we can tell a lot about what the court cares about—and what it doesn’t” from its cert decisions. [Slate]

    * Ha. After today’s story about the debt mistakes of Lisa S., here’s the cautionary tale of one “Elie M.” [Law and More]

    * Elizabeth Garrett, USC Provost, will become the next president of Cornell. Garrett will also be a tenured faculty member at Cornell Law School and is bringing along her husband, Andrei Marmor, who will also join the law school. See, this is how you hire administrators: get someone willing to do double-duty with teaching! [Cornell Chronicle]

    3 Comments / / Sep 30, 2014 at 5:13 PM
  • Redskins

    FCC, Football, Immigration, Job Searches, Non-Sequiturs, Prisons, Racism

    Non-Sequiturs: 09.03.14

    * As football prepares to kick off, there’s a new filing opposing the renewal of the broadcast license for Dan Snyder’s Washington-area radio station because it has a tendency to broadcast a particular racial slur over and over throughout the NFL season. [Corporate Counsel]

    * If you’re a young law grad ready to give up on being a lawyer, it’s harder to move into another industry than you’d think. [Law and More]

    * Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott sought an emergency stay to allow Texas to start shutting down abortion clinics despite a ruling that the law was unconstitutional. So he filed his motion at midnight on the Sunday before Labor Day. The Fifth Circuit does not brook this tripe. [Houston Chronicle]

    * New research confirms deportations don’t lower crime rates. They do, however, help drive up the BS in political ads, so that’s nice. [New York Times]

    * The confusing reports that Goldman Sachs was driving aluminum around Detroit to drive up the price of aluminum spawned a lawsuit. And that led to a dismissal. [Bloomberg View]

    * This is why you don’t eat underwear… [Daily Mail]

    * The legal battle surrounding Adam Carolla’s podcast is breaking up friendships now. [CNN]

    2 Comments / / Sep 3, 2014 at 5:04 PM
  • Kristen Saban

    Antonin Scalia, Barack Obama, D.C. Circuit, FCC, Food, Jury Duty, Morning Docket, Movies, Murder, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Trials

    Morning Docket: 02.20.14

    * Justice Scalia apparently has an ulterior motive for his hatred of deep-dish pizza: “He’s just trying to undermine Barack Obama because he’s a Chicago guy.” God, can’t the guy just like New York style pizza better? Come on. [WSJ Law Blog (sub. req.)]

    * Now that the Federal Communication Commission’s net neutrality rules have been smacked down by the D.C. Circuit, the agency is going to start from scratch and come up with some new ones. Yeah, good luck with that. [National Law Journal]

    * “Roll your window up, ignore the taunting, put your car in reverse, move a parking spot over.” These are some of the ways you can avoid killing black teenagers over loud music, says a Michael Dunn juror. [CNN]

    * The toupee gave it away: A lawyer who used to work as an i-banker at Stratton Oakmont is suing for defamation over a character he claims was modeled after him in the “Wolf of Wall Street.” [ABC News]

    * The lawsuit filed against Nick Saban’s daughter by her sorority sister was tossed under Alabama’s “stand your ground” rule over her objections that she was kind of like a defenseless receiver. [Associated Press]

    3 Comments / / Feb 20, 2014 at 9:08 AM