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Julie Buxbaum is a Harvard alumna and lawyer turned novelist. Her first book, The Opposite of Love, is getting favorable reviews. As we’ve written about before, she’s signed a deal for two books, so it’s a good sign that the first is being well-received.

For the lawyers who want to be writers: her advance was likely in excess of $500,000.

Carrie Bradshaw’s Smarter Sister [Washington Post]
The Opposite of Love [Amazon]

Cadwalader.jpgWe’re getting tips about something big going down at Cadwalader today, but no specifics yet. If you have information, be sure to let us know: tips AT abovethelaw DOT com.

Hopefully this is as exciting as their bed-bug infestation of ’07.

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If you live in NYC, you’re used to smoking being banned in almost every place of business; your law dates back to 2003. DC caught up in January of 2007. However, the pro-health laws have had a harder time down south where people get all hot and bothered when the government tries to tell ‘em what to do. Here in Tuscaloosa (‘Bama), the law bars smoking in restaurants before 10:00 pm. It’s a narrow victory for the non-smokers.

Professor Althouse posted today about the loophole in the Minnesota ban that allows smoking for “actors in theatrical performances.” Non-actors in Minnesota are trying to use the exception to get around their state’s ban.

We know we have readers all around the country. What’s the status of smoking in your town’s bars and restaurants? If there is a ban, is it enforced?

“The Tobacco Monologues” [Althouse]
NY State Smoking Ban Signed into Law [CNN]
DC Smoking Ban Approved [Washington Post]

The government acknowledged that a link exists between autism and the routine vaccines which one girl from Georgia was given as a child:

The cases are before a special “vaccine court” that doles out cash from a fund Congress set up to pay people injured by vaccines and to protect makers from damages as a way to help ensure an adequate vaccine supply. The burden of proof is lighter than in a traditional court, and is based on a preponderance of evidence. Since the fund started in 1988, it has paid roughly 950 claims _ none for autism.

Although the government didn’t say that the vaccines cause autism, they did concede that, in this single case, the vaccines worsened the girl’s existing condition and caused her to develop symptoms of autism.

We’re wondering about this “special ‘vaccine court.’ To our readers: what are some other interesting cases in which “special courts” were set up for a specific type of claim (not military tribunals; that’s too obvious)?

UPDATE: We’re asking about interesting cases when “special courts” set up for strange or unorthodox reasons.

Government Concedes Vaccine Injury Case [WaPo]

Power.jpgThat statement was made by Samantha Power, a top foreign policy adviser to Barack Obama and new-ish love interest of Professor Cass Sunstein. Sunstein recently accepted a position at Harvard Law, leaving behind in Chicago his ex, philosopher Martha Nussbaum. Bossman David Lat posted all the gossip about the academic love triangle here.

Power, pictured, let her words slip during an interview in London with The Scotsman yesterday. Other tasty bits from that interview:

“We f**ked up in Ohio,” she admitted.

“You just look at her [Clinton] and think, ‘Ergh’.

Apparently Power was under the impression that her remarks were “off the record,” and therefore couldn’t be attributed to her. The interview was actually totally on the record, and The Scotsman gives an explanation at the bottom of the link.

UPDATE: Power has resigned from the Obama campaign, effective immediately. See here.

‘Hillary Clinton’s a monster’: Obama Aid Blurts out Attack in Scotsman Interview [The Scotsman]

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* UNC student body President Eve Carson (pictured) was shot and killed yesterday in Chapel Hill. [CNN]
* NYC Assemblyman popped for DUI with a passed out woman in the backseat, and that’s not all. His sullied past includes allegations (plural) of rape and corruption. But, of course, he’s innocent until proven guilty. [CNN]
* Greece proposes new restrictions on blogs. Who blogs in Greece, anyway? About 40,000 people, apparently. [Spero News via This is Not my Country]
* If you use BitTorrent, you might want to hurry up and download all those Seinfeld episodes before it’s too late. NBC Universal has filed with the FCC arguing that efforts to impede BitTorrent use are justified. [WebTVWire.com]

* Feddie really, really likes Dahlia Lithwick. [Southern Appeal]

* Pretty smells may reduce stress in the workplace. We doubt it would work in law schools. [Neuromarketing]

* What would Obama ice cream taste like? Slate.com readers go crazy naming a Ben and Jerry’s flavor after the political hero. [Slate]

* The legality of laptop and electronic searches when you’re traveling. [WaPo]

* New York Magazine compiles a directory of the best lawyers in NYC. Are you on the list? [New York Magazine]

Dan Slater at the WSJ Law Blog posted on an interesting First Amendment case about a state trooper’s involvement with the KKK. The trooper was subsequently fired, and now he’s arguing for his job back:

In 2004, Robert Henderson, then a state trooper in Nebraska, joined an organization called the Knights Party after his wife left him for a hispanic man. The Knights Party is an affiliate of the Ku Klux Klan. In 2006, following a state patrol disciplinary hearing in which Henderson told the investigator he joined the Knights Party to vent his frustration, he was fired from the force. An arbitrator then overturned Henderson’s firing, saying that it violated his First Amednment rights. Nebraska’s Attorney General, John Bruning, then appealed that decision and won in a lower Nebraska State Court. Yesterday, Henderson and his lawyer, Vincent Valentino, appealed to Nebraska’s Supreme Court to have Henderson reinstated.

At the link, Slater delivers a great summary of the relevant law, courtesy of Stanford con law Professor Derek Shaffer.

State Trooper, Fired for Associating with KKK, Argues for Job Back [WSJ Law Blog]

The makers of supposed cold-buster Airborne settled a class action lawsuit over false advertising claims today. When the herbal supplement first debuted ten years ago, the packaging proclaimed that it could “ward off colds.” Since then, the company has softened its claim, but the only study to support Airborne’s efficacy was conducted by two people and paid for by the company. No wonder it has agreed to pay back $23.3 million.

If you’ve bought Airborne recently and you saved your receipt, they’ll reimburse you the $6.99 (Walgreen’s price). Hey, it may be worth it to some people.

UPDATE: Good news! Our diligent commenters pointed out that as long as you have proof of purchase of one box of Airborne, you can get a refund for up to six additional boxes. That raises the stakes to roughly $48.93, which may be worth it to this law student.

Airborne Settles Suit over False Claims [NPR]
Airborne Settlement Website

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That’s right, people. Kentucky Law’s lockers are unsafe. A tipster forwarded us the email that Associate Dean Bakert sent out today warning students not to keep books in their lockers until the security threat is addressed. There was a lock on the locker in question, but the crafty thug apparently broke it.
We know those law school books can be expensive, but they are not the things that a proper gangster steals. You can’t even brag about that, player.
We can think of some creative things the students could keep in their lockers instead of books. Like, you know, snacks and stuff. To our resourceful commenters: what helpful items would you suggest Kentucky’s law students keep in their lockers instead of books?
The text of the original email is posted after the jump.

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Book-Stealing Hoodlum on the Loose at U of Kentucky Law”

From a student at Duke Law School:

I had to laugh out loud at Kramer Levin’s use of the daylight savings time maxim, “spring ahead/spring forward,” to suggest that we could do the same for our careers by coming to their firm. See the flyer below, which they seem to have sent to the entire 1L class.

Actually, we think it’s kinda cute! Check out those otherworldly tulips:
Kramer Levin Naftalis Frankel spring ahead daylight savings time Above the Law blog.jpg
And it’s a helpful reminder for overworked law firm associates. If you have a conference call scheduled for, say, this Sunday morning at 10, you don’t want to miss it.

DLA Piper logo Above the Law blog.jpgSome minor email amusement, in the spirit of Skadden Arps and Pepper Hamilton, courtesy of the Chicago office of DLA Piper:

This is a pretty cool goof by Bill Rudnick, the new head of DLA Piper’s Chicago office. A group of partners just came over from Locke Lord Bissell, and apparently one of them went back to Locke Lord within a week.

Around 8:30 p.m. last Wednesday, three messages went out to the Chicago office all within a couple minutes. The first e-mail below went out first, followed by a “recall” message, and then the last message below.

Read the emails, after the jump.

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Yet Another Biglaw Email Screw-up”

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