Adderall

Last week, LSAC agreed to pay $7.73 million in penalties and damages to some students who applied for special accommodations on the LSAT and to reform some of its allegedly discriminatory practices. Elie wrote about the story in a post entitled “The LSAT Can’t Discriminate Against the Disabled: So, Time For Everybody To Get ADD.”

I agree with some of LSAC’s past policies and am happy to see others, like the flagging of score reports, go. I think that it’s hard, though, to contribute much to this conversation by worrying about people faking their way through an ADD exam . . . without knowing what an “ADD exam” means in this setting. It’s hard to move the issue forward by insisting that LSAC discourage abuse without being unfair. . . without knowing what LSAC has done in the past and why.

I’ve worked as a clinician administering many of the tests used to assess learning disabilities and difficulties, and I’ve helped individuals whose tests show they need intervention. (My favorite may be the Woodcock – Johnson Battery, just because of its name.) I currently use cognitive science to study how people best learn in law school. I may not be an authority like Dick Woodcock, but you could do a lot worse than me on a legal blog. So, I’d like to fill out the picture in the LSAC story a bit more….

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “How Easy Is It To Fake Out LSAC? On The LSAT And Accommodations For Learning Disabilities”

* Gun nuts want to prevent THE PENTAGON from buying too many bullets. [Talking Points Memo]

* Subway employees can be held liable for not helping police officers. I’m a legal genius. [New York Law Journal]

* Employment lawyers get catty on their way out of the door. [Thomson Reuters News & Insight]

* Do top firms even have compliance departments? [Corporate Counsel]

* Colleges are cracking down on Adderall abuse. So… it only took administrators about a decade to figure out that was going on. [New York Times]

* Okay, now Obama is going to close Guantanamo. And by “close,” I think he means “finds other excuses to leave it open.” [SCOTUSblog]

Staci here. The bar exam is right around the corner, and fear is starting to set in — fear of not being able to cram enough law into your head, fear of confusing necessary information, and the worst fear of all, the fear of failure.

But for all the Adderall addicts out there, these fears don’t seem to exist. Not sure about your mastery of a particular MBE topic? Just pop another pill and study for eight hours straight. Problem solved! (Note that we do not condone using study drugs to get ahead of the curve on the exam.)

If you’re not a chronic pill popper, not to worry, because Mr. Bar Exam has got some advice for you about the “brain foods” that you can eat to improve your memory and concentration….

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Mr. Bar Exam: When Failure Seems Like a Real Possibility”

It’s probably the Harvard in me that makes me want to subconsciously disparage the accomplishments of Stanford Law School whenever it bubbles up to number 2 in the U.S. News Law School Rankings.

But maybe we’ve got evidence on just how Stanford was able to jump ahead of HLS this year. A tipster reports that there’s an Adderall epidemic at Stanford Law. He says there might be an “Adderall ring” at the law school.

Maybe. Or maybe one pill fell on the ground…

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Adderall Abuse At Stanford Law School? Only If You Look Really Close.”

A little while back, we asked how many of you had tried Adderall, the ADHD drug that some students use to get a boost around study time. A whopping 30% of you said you had tried the drug and 70% of you are lying.

It’s a figure that should make law school deans sit up and take notice. You know, if they weren’t busy figuring out how to charge the students more money for an education that isn’t getting more valuable in any way.

But now let’s ask the fun question. Is using Adderall that big of a deal?

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Is Using Adderall to Get Through Exams the Worst Thing in the World?”

When I was in school, Ritalin was the performance-enhancing drug of choice. You could smash it up and snort it and do amazing feats like read an entire Emanuel’s Outline on mergers and acquisitions in a single sitting. Or you could write a whole law review note without getting bored. Or you could repaint your room, or reupholster your desk chair, or… oh s**t the paper is due in an hour and I have NOTHING.

Adderall, as I understand it, is the same, but better. It’s easy to get your hands on — all you have to do is fake the ADHD exam and you have your very own prescription for an amphetamine for law school and beyond. Or you can bum one off of a friend as finals stress approaches.

Haven’t you done that? Come on, be honest….

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “ATL Wellness Survey: Haven’t We All Had a Little Adderall?”

How hungry was the first guy who figured out this thing was food?

* I suppose stealing lobsters from Africa for export back to the U.S. is better than the alternative. [WSJ Law Blog]

* Adderall ring busted in Brooklyn! Don’t worry guys, looks like med students and doctors were the main miscreants (but a Tennessee lawyer is suspected of being a supplier). [Gothamist]

* You can now curse in Pennsylvania. [Legal Blog Watch]

*… and show a lady’s naked bum on television. [New York Daily News]

* Blind law students can get tech help when taking the bar exam. The thought of Lady Justice actually having anything to do with the bar exam is very exciting. [How Appealing]

* The myths about having a country law practice. Apparently your clients pay you in legal tender now, instead of offering you produce and daughters for competent representation. [Lawyerist]

* A Round Tuit makes his return after a month off. There are a lot of DUI stories, which gives me an idea of what he’s been doing during his break. [Infamy or Praise]

* David Kelley and Robert Morvillo, former adversaries from the Martha Stewart case, meet again — this time to serve together on an NYPD commission. [NYC.gov]