California

Megyn Kelly of Fox News

* “Those of us from the Midwest think it’s actually easier to hide a child in New York.” Many of the current Supreme Court justices are from New York. How does it affect their jurisprudence? [Washington Post]

* The percentage of women associates in law firms may be down nationally, but in California, the demographic is on the rise — except in Silicon Valley, which is really hardly surprising. [The Recorder]

* Megyn Kelly, who’s been compared to a “brilliant supermodel,” is now considered the brightest star on Fox News, with more than 2.5 million viewers. Albany Law School must be so proud. [Washington Post]

* Class action powerhouse Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll hired Matthew S. Axelrod of DOJ fame (most recently as Associate Deputy Attorney General) to join the firm as a partner. Congrats! [Law360 (sub. req.)]

* “The fact that rape insurance is even being discussed by this body is repulsive.” Yep. Rape insurance. Apparently that’s a thing in Michigan now, which is pretty unbelievable. The more you know. [MSNBC]

* Here’s a helpful hint for our readers: when you’re trying to get released on bail prior to your jewel heist trial, you probably shouldn’t list your occupation on a court form as “jewelry thief.” [Los Angeles Times]

The Warhol maxim about media celebrity has worked its way into litigation with a pair of high-profile legal disputes over the late artist’s work. Fittingly for Warhol-related news, the cases both glitter with celebrity and elevate the most mundane items to the altar of contention.

In one case, world-famous pop culture icons are pitted in a case involving sex, betrayal, higher education, and art appraisal. In the other, parties duke it out over a frigging box. An ordinary, cardboard box. They say it’s worth $250,000 because… why not?

Warhol once said, “making money is art and working is art and good business is the best art,” and he’s now nodding approvingly as millionaires are running to courthouses to fight over pictures he drew half a century ago…

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Andy Warhol Gives Everyone Their 15 Minutes In Court”

O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay! On Friday, California bar exam results came out (and 55.8% of applicants passed, with a pass rate of 68% for first-time takers, meaning that just one stat is up (barely) from last year’s results). And today, we’ve finally got a list of the passage rates for the July 2013 administration of the New York bar exam by law school.

In 2012, more than half of the state’s law schools saw their pass rates take a tumble. In 2013, more than half of the state’s law schools were able to improve their pass rates, and in some cases, by epic proportions. The state’s overall pass rate for first-time takers jumped by two percentage points.

So which law schools’ pass rates climbed, and by how much? And which school sank like a stone?

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “New York Bar Exam Results By Law School: Open Thread (2013)”


For those too young to remember, allow me to explain. It wasn’t until Ryan White that Ronald Reagan even knew what AIDS was. The sick kid from Indiana prompted President Reagan to, in one of his famous fireside chats, declare war on the disease. That war was won two years later with an armistice signed in Paris by emissaries from both warring nations. Anyway, that’s why we have parades all the time now.

Fast forward, like, 70 years, and we arrive at last week. A larcenous little leukemia survivor stole our collective hearts with a day of make-believe so unbelievably rich, the Muppet Babies have considered filing a copyright lawsuit. The child, with a real name no one cares about and the fake name “Batkid,” was allowed to run around the entire city of San Francisco while denizens of that city (mostly homeless bums) pretended that he was a superhero. He rescued a damsel in distress, helped to arrest the Riddler, and finished the day off by murdering the Penguin in cold blood. JKJKJK. The Penguin plot line had something to do with the San Francisco Giants mascot.

Anyway, the sickly little scamp had a helluva day and made everyone feel like a million bucks. All because of pretend.

And no one pretended harder than the U.S. Attorney’s Office….

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “The Riddler And The Penguin Get Caught — Thanks To Batkid”

Earlier this week, Above the Law hosted its first-ever Fashion Law Forum in Los Angeles at the W Hollywood. Despite the traffic on the 405, the event was very well-attended, and we nearly had a full house in the audience. Everyone was dressed to the nines, and we couldn’t have been happier with how this elegant soiree turned out.

The highlight of the evening was a lively discussion, moderated by ATL’s Staci Zaretsky, about all of the ins and outs of fashion law. Panelists included Staci Riordan, Chair of the Fox Rothschild Fashion Law Practice Group; Jane Shay Wald, Chair of Irell & Manella’s Trademark Practice Group; Deborah Greaves, Secretary and General Counsel of True Religion Brand Jeans; and Erica Alterwitz, Assistant General Counsel of BCBG Max Azria Group Inc.

If you’re interested in becoming a fashion attorney, here are three takeaways from our esteemed panelists that you can use to get a better understanding of the industry before you dive in…

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “3 Things You Need To Know If You Want To Work In Fashion Law”

The worlds of fashion and law have been sewn together to create a niche practice known as fashion law, where lawyers strut their stuff on the catwalk of cutting-edge intellectual property and business matters. Won’t you join the fun?

We are pleased to invite you to an evening of cocktails, canapés, and conversation focusing on the many ins and outs of fashion law. The event will take place in Los Angeles, California on November 12th from 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. This event will be a great opportunity for attendees to hear legal leaders share their insights on success, meet members of the Above the Law team, and network with peers.

As an added bonus, representatives from M Dot Design Studio will be on hand with a rack of clothing that guests can peruse, and will offer accessorizing tips, give out discount cards to all attendees, and raffle off a piece of jewelry for one lucky guest. You’ll also be able to chat with representatives from Flywheel about the hottest new indoor cycling craze.

Our esteemed panelists confirmed for the event include:

  • Staci Riordan, Chair of the Fox Rothschild Fashion Law Practice Group
  • Jane Wald, Chair of Irell & Manella’s Trademark Practice Group
  • Deborah Greaves, Secretary and General Counsel of True Religion Brand Jeans
  • Erica Alterwitz, Assistant General Counsel of BCBG Max Azria Group Inc.

There is no charge for this event. Thanks to our friends at Recommind for their generous sponsorship.

Please RSVP below. We look forward to seeing you in Los Angeles!

“[O]ne familiar with the profound debates that ushered our Federal Constitution into existence is bound to respect those who remain loyal to the ideals and dreams of ‘Our Federalism.’ The concept does not mean blind deference to ‘States’ Rights’ any more than it means centralization of control over every important issue in our National Government and its courts. The Framers rejected both these courses. What the concept does represent is a system in which there is sensitivity to the legitimate interests of both State and National Governments, and in which the National Government, anxious though it may be to vindicate and protect federal rights and federal interests, always endeavors to do so in ways that will not unduly interfere with the legitimate activities of the States. It should never be forgotten that this slogan, ‘Our Federalism,’ born in the early struggling days of our Union of States, occupies a highly important place in our Nation’s history and its future.”

– Justice Hugo Black, Younger v. Harris

Our Federalism. Our dear Federalism. Justice Black described this vaunted principle when deciding in 1971 that federal courts must show some restraint when interfering with state criminal prosecutions.

“Our Federalism,” though, only works when you work it. The many conservatives (myself included) who trumpet these principles in briefs, articles, and opinions ought to view this not simply as an academic matter but as a personal political responsibility as citizens.

For all the caterwauling on all sides about national politics and for all the petticoat-clutching over Our Federalism, it is shameful when those same folks can’t name a single member of their city council or school board or state supreme court. . . .

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “When ‘Our Federalism’ Turns Into ‘Somebody Else’s Federalism': Why Local Elections Matter”

The worlds of fashion and law have been sewn together to create a niche practice known as fashion law, where lawyers strut their stuff on the catwalk of cutting-edge intellectual property and business matters. Won’t you join the fun?

We are pleased to invite you to an evening of cocktails, canapés, and conversation focusing on the many ins and outs of fashion law. The event will take place in Los Angeles, California on November 12th from 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. This event will be a great opportunity for attendees to hear legal leaders share their insights on success, meet members of the Above the Law team, and network with peers. Representatives from M Dot Design Studio will be on hand with a rack of clothing that guests can peruse, and will offer accessorizing tips, give out discount cards to all attendees, and raffle off a piece of jewelry for one lucky guest.

Our esteemed panelists confirmed for the event include:

  • Staci Riordan, Chair of the Fox Rothschild Fashion Law Practice Group
  • Jane Wald, Chair of Irell & Manella’s Trademark Practice Group
  • Deborah Greaves, Secretary and General Counsel of True Religion Brand Jeans
  • Erica Alterwitz, Assistant General Counsel of BCBG Max Azria Group Inc.

There is no charge for this event. Thanks to our friends at Recommind for their generous sponsorship.

Please RSVP below. We look forward to seeing you in Los Angeles!

A lawyer’s letter, properly written, can be a thing of beauty. In recent months, we’ve shared with you a very funny settlement offer letter, an epic response to a cease-and-desist letter, and another C&D response that laid the smackdown on a top Biglaw firm.

But sometimes snarky letters miss the mark. Take this prospective law student’s response to a rejection letter. Some readers appreciated it, but many others (myself included) felt it went too far.

A fine line separates wit and obnoxiousness. And reasonable minds can disagree on whether a given letter embodies the former or the latter.

We recently got our hands on an amazing lawyer’s letter out of Los Angeles. It was written a while ago, but it’s only making the rounds now. What do you make of it?

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “From The ‘Why People Hate Lawyers’ File: An L.A. Lawyer’s Letter”

This week the Supreme Court, via a one-line order by Justice Anthony Kennedy, dismissed an appeal in Brown v. Plata for want of jurisdiction. Thousands of law students enrolled in Fed Jur and Fed Courts classes this semester may argue that there’s nothing sexy about jurisdiction, even by law’s substantially reduced standards for “sexiness.” The dismissal of Plata, though, has some significant effects for millions of people.

In 2011, the Supreme Court ruled in a 5-4 opinion authored by Justice Kennedy that overcrowding in California prisons caused continuing violations of prisoners’ Eighth Amendment rights to adequate health care and that the overcrowding problem required a population limit. (Justice Scalia dissented, joined by Justice Thomas. Justice Alito also dissented, joined by the Chief.) As a result, California Governor Jerry Brown needed to drastically improve prison conditions or drastically reduce the state’s prison population by releasing inmates.

A flurry of state appeals and motions to change the original order ensued. Then, on September 24 of this year, a three-judge panel gave Brown until the end of January to meet its original order to remove more than 9,600 inmates from California prisons by the end of the year, absent successful negotiations with the plaintiffs. In an attempt to sufficiently improve prison conditions, Governor Brown negotiated a deal with legislators to spend $400 million on improvement of health care services to California prisoners, but he believed he needed more time in order to fully comply by the panel’s deadline. He filed an an appeal for a stay with SCOTUS….

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “The Consequences of Brown v. Plata Are Nothing to Dismiss: The California Prison Case Continues”

Page 5 of 38123456789...38