Career Files

Ed. note: This is the latest installment in a series of posts from the ATL Career Center’s team of expert contributors. Today, Ian E. Scott offers 10 valuable pieces of advice for Biglaw summer associates.

While a full-time job at a large law firm is not for everyone, a summer at one is highly recommended. Even if you are not sure if you have an interest in practicing at a large firm after the summer, a summer at one is a great experience and you will be paid around $35,000 for the summer. You should be careful though, because many who have summered at large corporate firms and swore that it was just for the summer, often must have drank the Kool-Aid and went back after graduation. If you have decided to work for a top law firm during the summer here are a few things to consider.

1. You will likely get a job offer but do not take it for granted.

Continue reading at the ATL Career Center…

Ed note: This is the latest installment in a series of posts from the ATL Career Center’s team of expert contributors. Today, Marc Luber challenges Jim Saksa’s Slate article, “You Can Do Anything With A Law Degree,” with several viable career alternatives for JDs.

After law school, I took an unpaid internship. When I got my first music industry job in Los Angeles, I was severely underpaid. I sometimes wondered if the job required a high school degree, let alone a law degree. If you asked me then, I would have told you that a J.D. is a joke and that you should stay away from law school at all costs.

But now, I take issue with the idea that “’you can do anything with a law degree’ is a vicious lie.” Articles like these do nothing for unemployed law grads (except provoke righteous indignation) and discourage the many unhappy practicing lawyers from leaving law for paths that better fit their souls.

Continue reading at the ATL Career Center…

Ed note: This is the latest installment in a series of posts from the ATL Career Center’s team of expert contributors. Today, Dan Lear explores the role of technology in the future of the legal industry.

“A lot of people have recently jumped in [to the legal tech/startup space] but the fact is that law isn’t any different than any other industry.” Josh Kubicki – Co-founder Lex Redux

In August 2011 Mark Andreessen, co-founder of Netscape and noted venture capitalist, wrote an essay in the Wall Street Journal entitled “Why Software is Eating the World.” In it Andreessen stated that software had already revolutionized many industries: bookselling (think Amazon vs. Borders), video rental (Netflix vs. Blockbuster), and music (iTunes, Spotify, and Pandora) and warned: “Companies in every industry need to assume that a software revolution is coming.” (Emphasis added.)

Fast forward less than three years and Lex Redux may be the sound of the software revolution arriving at the legal industry’s doorstep.

Continue reading at the ATL Career Center…


Ed note: This is the latest installment in a series of posts from the ATL Career Center’s team of expert contributors. Today, Rob Jordan gives advice to attorneys on how to best position themselves to clarify or confirm their career path.

“Better to be at the bottom of a ladder you want to climb than in the middle of some ladder you don’t, right?” — Dave Eggers, The Circle (affiliate link)

Everyday, many lawyers sit unhappily in their offices with little clarity about their professional futures. I know: I was one of them.

Today, the continued weakness and real-time evolution of the business of law merely compounds the uncertainty. In this environment, it is critical that lawyers regularly perform self-reviews to assess contentment and career trajectory.

These reviews will obviously be very personal. Some lawyers may simply conclude that their unease stems from the plain practice of law; that their law degree is a sunk cost; and that every day spent practicing law rather than pursuing a career acting, rapping, or starting a company is opportunity cost. Others, however, may not be fortunate enough to arrive at such a definitive conclusion; rather, they may be stuck in a state of inertia, unclear whether they like or want to continue to practice law.

Continue reading at the ATL Career Center….

Ed note:This is the latest installment in a series of posts from the ATL Career Center’s team of expert contributors. Today, Megan Grandinetti explains why “treating yourself” with your favorite foods may not be the best idea.

I gave a wellness talk at a law firm recently, and one of my tips for staying healthy while working crazy hours is to “streamline your Seamless”: pick a number of healthy, go-to meals that you can order during late nights at the office (and stick with those choices). Some of the participants were taken aghast by this suggestion: “BLASPHEMY!” they cried. “We deserve to treat ourselves for working so hard!”

I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but the “Treat Yourself” attitude is not going to work in the long run, unless you’re trying to gain weight for a movie role (Now Playing: The Chubby, Sedentary Lawyer).

Continue reading at the ATL Career Center…

Ed note: This is the latest installment in a series of posts from the ATL Career Center’s team of expert contributors. Today, Dave Hall, founder of Velocity Test Prep, and David Mainiero, Admissions Expert at InGenius Prep, examine major factors pre-law students should consider before selecting a law school

So, you rocked your college grades, steamrolled the LSAT, impressed/conned/bribed your professors into writing outstanding recommendation letters, crafted the perfect law school résumé, and rounded out all of that perfection with an ideal theme for your personal statement and supplementary essays. Now, the only thing left to do is pick your law school out of the pile of admissions offers flooding your mailbox. Good problem to have, but how do you choose?

This is a matter we’ve given some thought to, and we suggest that you may want to use these three factors to make your decision. (Now, these three factors assume that your goal is to get a reasonably high-paying Biglaw or “medium law” type job. If that’s not your goal, the second section of this article will be much more relevant to you.)

Continue reading at the ATL Career Center…

Ed. note: This is the latest installment in a series of posts from the ATL Career Center’s team of expert contributors. Today, Sunny Choi of Ms. JD interviews lawyers who have found their passion by leaving the law.

Fact: The law isn’t for everyone. Fiction: You have to practice law if you’re a law school graduate.

Sometimes, you just have to leave the law completely and follow the road less traveled in order to find your true passion. I’ve interviewed two former attorneys who were brave enough to venture into the unknown and in the process, discover their passions outside of the law.

MEE-JUNG JANG (New York, NY)

1. What is your current occupation or line of work?

I’m the founder/CEO of a tech startup called Voncierge.com.

2. Did you practice any law after graduating, and if so, where and what did you practice?

I practiced corporate and IP law at Cleary Gottlieb in Manhattan for about two years.

3. What made you decide to completely leave the law and pursue a startup?

Continue reading at the ATL Career Center…

Ed note: This is the latest installment in a series of posts from the ATL Career Center’s team of expert contributors. Today, Ann K. Levine, a law school admission consultant and owner of LawSchoolExpert.com, offers helpful tips for law school applicants.

Spring is finally here and after a rough winter in most of the country, you’re probably longing for the lazy days of summer. But if you’re planning to apply to law school this fall, there are some things you should consider doing before you book that trip to the beach.

Your first summer homework assignment is to make sure you understand the law school admissions process and timeline. You can visit the Law School Expert blog for an overview of the process and a sample law school application checklist.

Once you have a good understanding of the mechanics of applying to law school, you should consider your motive in doing so. I challenge you to take this summer to explore whether the law is right for you — and I mean the reality of what it means to be a lawyer, not what you think you know from watching House of Cards.

Continue reading at the ATL Career Center…

Ed. note: This is the latest installment in a series of posts from the ATL Career Center’s team of expert contributors. Today, Casey Berman discusses seven transferable skills that can give attorneys an advantage in the job market.

Some of us lawyers want to leave the law: We are unhappy and dissatisfied with our work situation. We suffer long hours. We find our day-to-day lawyer tasks mostly uninteresting. We are demotivated because we are not included in the partner track discussions. We feel we receive little-to-no mentoring. We are weighed down by high student loans.

And maybe most important, we feel that our professional skill set is not really in alignment with the duties and responsibilities required to be a lawyer. We are not fully confident that we can be a really good lawyer. It’s turning out that what we are good at doing and what we enjoy doing isn’t what an attorney does. We’re pretty sure that this lawyer gig is really not for us.

Continue reading at the ATL Career Center…

Non-lawyers are often surprised to learn of the lockstep salary schemes of large law firms and the near-perfect information we have about them. (Recall Kevin Drum’s befuddlement at the bi-modal distribution of law graduate salaries and the “weird cultural collusion” it suggested.) Even annual bonuses are frequently spelled out in what amounts to public memoranda and are typically some variation of the “market” dictated by our Cravath overlords. Of course, there are some “black box” firms and a few gilded outliers such as Wachtell Lipton or Boies Schiller, but generally speaking, the world of large firms practices a degree of relative transparency around compensation that is unsurpassed outside the public sector.

In order to distinguish among firms, we have to look to the margins. For example, law firms vary quite a bit when it comes to paying for the bar and living expenses of incoming associates. Some firms may reimburse for covered expenses after the fact; others may pay some expenses directly to the provider. Some may give a stipend to cover living expenses, whereas others may offer the ability to take out an advance on salary.

Greater transparency (or, at least, aggregated information) on these questions might make one firm’s offer more attractive than another’s, or perhaps even give an offeree some basis for negotiating a package upgrade (but of course tread very lightly there)….

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