Constitutional Law

  • Reema Bajaj

    Biglaw, Constitutional Law, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Federal Judges, Gay Marriage, Guns / Firearms, Health Care / Medicine, Insurance, John Marshall Law School, John Roberts, Law Schools, Money, Morning Docket, Religion, SCOTUS, Sonia Sotomayor, Supreme Court, Utah, Women's Issues

    Morning Docket: 01.02.14

    * In his year-end report, Chief Justice Roberts politely asked Congress to make it rain on the federal judiciary in fiscal year 2014, because “[t]he future would be bleak” without additional funding. [Reuters]

    * Utah finally asked for Supreme Court intervention in its quest to stop gay couples from marrying, but Justice Sotomayor wants a response from the other side before she weighs in. WWSSD? [BuzzFeed]

    * Perhaps Justice Sotomayor saw the humor in this: she just gave a group of nuns a temporary reprieve from having to give out birth control to a bunch of women who have taken vows of chastity. [Bloomberg]

    * Where in the world is Carmen Sandiego Steven Davis? Oh boy, Dewey have some news for you! The failed firm’s former chairman is now the chief legal representative for Ras al Khaimah in the United Arab Emirates. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * “The Second Amendment does not preclude reasonable regulation.” A judge upheld the majority of New York’s new gun laws as constitutional. Opponents are ready to lock and load on appeal. [New York Times]

    * Just because your law school isn’t ranked, it doesn’t mean you can’t dream big. Case in point: one of this year’s Skadden Fellows will graduate from John Marshall (Chicago) this spring. [National Law Journal]

    * Reema Bajaj, the attorney who pleaded guilty to a prostitution charge, decided that she wasn’t in the mood to ride this Johnson any longer. Like her panties, the case has been dropped. [Daily Chronicle]

    2 Comments / / Jan 2, 2014 at 9:28 AM
  • Edward Snowden

    Barack Obama, Constitutional Law, Department of Justice, Election Law, Federal Government, Federal Judges, Health Care / Medicine, Law Schools, Morning Docket, S.D.N.Y., SCOTUS, Shira Scheindlin, Sonia Sotomayor, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 12.24.13

    * People have “greatly underestimated how powerful a jurist Justice Sotomayor would be,” and now that one of her concurrences flies directly in the face of Obama’s NSA tactics, we’ll get to see how powerful she really is. [MSNBC]

    * Here’s a fun end-of-the-year roundup: President Obama’s Top 10 Constitutional Violations of 2013. Fifty internet points shall be awarded to the first person who correctly guesses how many are related to Obamacare without looking. [Forbes]

    * Following Judge Shira Scheindlin’s stop-and-frisk spanking, the Southern District of New York changed its rules on case assignments in order to increase transparency. Related-case judge-shopping just got a whole lot harder. [New York Times]

    * Wiley Rein is defending its fee request in the Voting Rights Act case, and says the Department of Justice is “[tying] itself in knots” trying to find a way to get out of paying the piper. Harsh. [Blog of Legal Times]

    * These are four ways you can overcome a low GPA when applying to law school, but really, the best way to overcome a low GPA is to not apply at all. [Law Admissions Lowdown / U.S. News & World Report]

    * “I am not trying to bring down the NSA, I am working to improve the NSA.” Now that he’s unleashed all of America’s deep dark secrets, Edward Snowden just wants to Google like a regular guy. [Washington Post]

    2 Comments / / Dec 24, 2013 at 9:17 AM
  • ruth-bader-ginsburg-RF2

    Constitutional Law, Linda Greenhouse, Politics, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, SCOTUS, Stephen Breyer, Supreme Court

    Justice Ginsburg Shouldn’t Retire, Says Too-Clever-By-Half Article

    It’s not that Justice Ginsburg is wrong. Well, no, actually she’s just wrong.

    9 Comments / / Dec 23, 2013 at 1:27 PM
  • Chimpanzee Phone RF

    Animal Law, Lawsuit of the Day

    Lawsuit Of The Apes

    Who will speak for the chimps?

    34 Comments / / Dec 3, 2013 at 10:15 AM
  • constitution we the people

    Akhil Amar, Constitutional Law, Jeffrey Toobin, Law Professors, New Yorker, Noah Feldman, Orrin Hatch, Politics, Quote of the Day, Sanford Levinson

    We The People… Can Do Better?

    Is the Constitution to blame for the current political dysfunction?

    13 Comments / / Dec 2, 2013 at 1:49 PM
  • 763px-Crossroads_baker_explosion-RF

    Constitutional Law, D.C. Circuit, Federal Judges, Judicial Nominations, Politics, R. Ted Cruz, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    And Boom Goes The (Nuclear) Dynamite: Previewing The Derptastic Sound Bytes You’re About To Hear

    Senator Harry Reid finally invokes the so-called “nuclear option” to get President Obama’s nominees on the D.C. Circuit. Here comes the combative spin.

    21 Comments / / Nov 21, 2013 at 4:02 PM
  • Making the guest list and checking it twice.

    Constitutional Law, Diarmuid O'Scannlain, Federalist Society, Law Professors, Quote of the Day, Religion

    Why Does Xenu Love The First Amendment?

    Does the First Amendment contain a “reasonableness” requirement?

    5 Comments / / Nov 15, 2013 at 3:59 PM
  • upskirt RF

    Constitutional Law, Free Speech, Perverts, Privacy, Quote of the Day

    Man Claims First Amendment Right To Take Pornographic ‘Upskirt’ Pictures

    Do you have a Constitutional right to be a pervert? This man’s attorney thinks so.

    36 Comments / / Nov 7, 2013 at 3:16 PM
  • Transportation_Security_Administration_officer_screening_a_bag

    Constitutional Law, Copyright, Gay, Harvard Law Review, Law Professors, Law Reviews, Law Schools, Non-Sequiturs, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.15.13

    * Airport security has forbidden joking about bombs and hijacking. Now TSA is cracking down on joking about TSA itself. In the interest of my next flight, “I love you, TSA!” [Daily Mail]

    * A detailed analysis of the 14th Amendment’s role in the debt ceiling debate. President Obama should employ this solution now before the Supreme Court realizes there’s another part of the 14th Amendment they can overturn. [Main Street]

    * Law school professors do not take kindly to your antics. [Law Prof Blog]

    * A Cooley Law professor is arguing against gay rights. Sorry, a Western Michigan Law professor is arguing against gay rights. [Pride Source]

    * The rules don’t apply to Yale or Harvard. Or at least the rules don’t apply to their law reviews. [Professor Bainbridge]

    * Congress is still trying to decide how to regulate FM radio instead of looking at salient issues in modern copyright law. Given how brilliantly they keep the government open, maybe FM radio is the biggest issue we should give them right about now. [The Daily Caller]

    * The lawyer as generalist is fading into obscurity. Let’s commemorate it in poetry, shall we? [Poetic Justice]

    * A preview of some upcoming Supreme Court cases this week. Complete with cartoons! [The Spark File]

    * Finally, here’s a little gem for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg fans that we got….

    12 Comments / / Oct 15, 2013 at 5:02 PM
  • constitution we the people

    Abortion, Barack Obama, Biglaw, Celebrities, Constitutional Law, Federal Government, Law Firm Mergers, Money, Morning Docket, Partner Issues, Real Estate, SCOTUS, Securities and Exchange Commission, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 10.10.13

    * “There are no magic bullets here.” Caught in a “trilemma,” President Obama is up against the wall and is running out of options. He soon might be forced to choose the least unconstitutional solution to the nation’s problems. [Bloomberg]

    * During the government shutdown, it certainly wouldn’t be worth it for furloughed employees to hire lawyers to fight their “essential” versus “non-essential” determinations — please, like they’ll be able to afford legal representation right now. [National Law Journal]

    * It seems some partners at both Dentons and McKenna Long & Aldridge aren’t fans of a possible tie-up, so they’re heading for the hills as fast as they can. Perhaps it simply wasn’t meant to be? [Am Law Daily]

    * It’s time for our favorite show, As the Weil Turns! Partners from various offices are departing for other Biglaw firms, and we can now confirm that Steven Peck is a new face at Proskauer. [Law360 (sub. req.)]

    * We told you last week that Matthew Martens of Fabulous Fab fame would be leaving the SEC, but now we know where he’s landing. Congrats on your new home at WilmerHale. [WSJ Law Blog (sub. req.)]

    * Ohio is the latest state to offer “hazy” abortion restrictions that skirt the very edge of Supreme Court jurisprudence in order to make women feel guilty about their own right to choose. [New York Times]

    * “Without makeup she looks like the Joker in Batman.” Joan Rivers is locked in a $15 million condo catfight with a Canadian socialite who isn’t afraid to pull punches. Meow! [New York Daily News]

    5 Comments / / Oct 10, 2013 at 9:08 AM
  • scalia talking RF

    Antonin Scalia, Clerkships, Constitutional Law, Gay, John Paul Stevens, Religion, Supreme Court, Supreme Court Clerks, Television, Women's Issues

    10 Tasty Tidbits From Justice Antonin Scalia

    A wide-ranging interview with Justice Scalia, covering everything from his pet peeves (women cursing), his tastes in television, and his desire to hire more law clerks from “lesser” law schools.

    37 Comments / / Oct 7, 2013 at 11:13 AM
  • Obamacare RF

    Barack Obama, Constitutional Law, Health Care / Medicine, Politics

    When Democracy Hurts: The Painful But Legitimate Debate Over Obamacare

    Conservative columnist Tamara Tabo defends Republican efforts to defund Obamacare.

    57 Comments / / Oct 4, 2013 at 12:39 PM
  • Dzhokhar Tsarnaev

    Barack Obama, Biglaw, Constitutional Law, Entertainment Law, Federal Judges, General Counsel, Kasowitz Benson, Law Professors, Money, Morning Docket, Prisons, Women's Issues

    Morning Docket: 10.04.13

    * “We’re in uncharted territory right now.” The federal courts made it through the first week of the shutdown, but they’re approaching “here be dragons” land in terms of funding. [National Law Journal]

    * “It would be the most interesting case in decades.” Legal experts (read: law professors from T14s) debate whether President Obama can ignore the debt ceiling for much longer. [New York Times]

    * People are getting out of Biglaw while the getting’s good. Reed Smith’s global managing partner is leaving the firm for a general counsel gig after 13 years at the helm. [WSJ Law Blog (sub. req.)]

    * Law firm leaders met to discuss how to empower women attorneys, and agreed it’s wise to parade them around in front of clients. Getting to work on those clients’ cases is another question. [Blog of Legal Times]

    * No debacles here, contrary to past precedent: Kasowitz Benson poached two superior legal minds from NBCUniversal and welcomed them to the firm to open an entertainment litigation practice. [Bloomberg]

    * Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s lawyers want their client’s prison restrictions to be lifted and are raising a slew of constitutional claims. We think the members of his fan club are the only ones feeling sorry for him. [CNN]

    3 Comments / / Oct 4, 2013 at 9:13 AM
  • Mark Cuban

    Constitutional Law, Insider Trading, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Police, Politics, SCOTUS, Securities and Exchange Commission, Securities Law, Supreme Court, Wall Street

    Morning Docket: 09.30.13

    * If the government shuts down and then defaults on its debt, Wall Street worries that it would “shake the foundations of the global financial system.” Hooray for political asshattery! [DealBook / New York Times]

    * At least six of the Supreme Court’s judicial precedents are up for reconsideration in the upcoming Term, and high court commentators think the resulting decisions could be a mixed bag. [National Law Journal]

    * Apparently low-income New Yorkers’ legal problems are “not worthy of a ‘real lawyer,’” or at least that’s the message that will be given if non-lawyers are allowed to provide legal services. [New York Law Journal]

    * Sorry, lady, not enough prestige. A Brazilian journalist was allegedly on the receiving end of some “extremely violent” police behavior at Yale Law School after attempting to interview Justice Joaquim Barbosa at a private event. [The Guardian]

    * Mark Cuban’s insider trading case is heading to trial today, but we genuinely wonder how he’ll be able to convince a jury that he’s “humble and affable,” rather than the “master of the universe.” [Boston Herald]

    4 Comments / / Sep 30, 2013 at 9:11 AM
  • constitution we the people

    Antonin Scalia, Biglaw, Constitutional Law, Deaths, Federal Judges, Guns / Firearms, Law Schools, Money, Morning Docket, Politics, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Violence, Women's Issues

    Morning Docket: 09.17.13

    * The death toll of the latest mass shooting at the Navy Yard is 13 (including the gunman, military contractor Aaron Alexis), and people are rallying for stricter gun control laws before we’ve even had time to mourn. When will we ever learn? [New York Times]

    * Today is Constitution Day, and Justice Antonin Scalia would like to remind you to celebrate — except if you think it’s a living document. If that’s the case, you can just “[f]ugget about the Constitution,” because that thing is dead, baby. [Blog of Legal Times]

    * Please sir, we want some more! The Judiciary Conference has been forced to plea poverty to President Barack Obama due to its teeny tiny itsy bitsy post-sequestration budget. [National Law Journal (sub. req.)]

    * Congrats to Kimberley Leach Johnson, the first woman to climb to the very top of the ladder at Quarles & Brady. That makes her the only eighth woman currently leading a Biglaw firm. [WSJ Law Blog (sub. req.)]

    * And congrats to Matt Johnson, outgoing chief counsel to Senator John Cornyn (R-Texas), on his return to the private sector. He’ll be taking his talents to the lobbying firm, McBee Strategic Consulting. [The Hill]

    * From second career choices to no career choices: if you want to go to law school after working in another field, you should consider if it will help or hinder your applications. [Law Admissions Lowdown / U.S. News]

    3 Comments / / Sep 17, 2013 at 9:04 AM
  • Lady Gaga

    Bar Exams, Celebrities, Constitutional Law, Education / Schools, Labor / Employment, Law School Deans, Law Schools, LLMs, Money, Morning Docket, Pro Bono, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Texas, Trademarks

    Morning Docket: 09.16.13

    * You skip over the footnotes when you’re reading for class, but Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg doesn’t think you should. She’s a proponent of the most important footnote in all of constitutional law. [New Yorker]

    * New York will modify its pro bono requirement for LL.M. students to allow public service completed outside the country. Well, so much for closing the state’s justice gap. [New York Law Journal (sub. req.)]

    * Everything’s bigger in Texas, including the government-initiated trademark infringement actions over “Don’t Mess With Texas.” Like “I <3 NY,” the Lone Star State’s slogans are off limits. [New York Times]

    * WUSTL Law Dean Kent Syverud didn’t mind advocating for halving professors’ salaries. He just stepped down to become Syracuse University’s president — for much higher pay. [National Law Journal (sub. req.)]

    * You can sue Lady Gaga for overtime pay all you want, but you do not want to face her wrath. The pop star is due in court in early November where she’ll tell a judge “exactly what f**king happened.” [Daily Mail]

    2 Comments / / Sep 16, 2013 at 9:13 AM
  • SchillingNew

    Baseball, Constitutional Law, Federal Circuit, Google / Search Engines, Movies, Non-Sequiturs, Patents, Richard Posner, Securities and Exchange Commission, Technology, Television, Women's Issues

    Non-Sequiturs: 09.12.13

    * The hits keep on coming for Curt Schilling. Now the SEC has woken up and decided to probe the $75 million he secured from the state of Rhode Island (already the subject of another suit). Maybe he can fake another bloody sock to generate some sympathy. [Bloomberg]

    * Apple sold a “Season Pass” to Breaking Bad Season 5 and then refused to honor the second half of the season to its subscribers, prompting an Ohio doctor to file suit for $20, with hopes of building a class action. Look, Apple needed that money; Tim Cook is desperate these days. [Deadline: Hollywood]

    * Speaking of Apple, the Federal Circuit looks like it’s going to give Apple another crack at its claim that Google ripped off the iPhone patents, citing “significant” errors on the part of the last judge to rule on the dispute: Richard Posner. You come at the king, you best not miss. [Wall Street Journal]

    * And last, but definitely not least, Apple’s new fingerprint ID will be the death of the Fifth Amendment. Discuss. [Wired]

    * A film chock-full of unsanctioned footage and insulting knocks on Disney has been picked up for distribution. This is your official warning that it’s time to prepare the beauty pageant pitch for the Disney execs. [Grantland]

    * Elie smash, Charlotte Law School. [NPR Charlotte]

    * The International Association of Young Lawyers conference will feature a speed dating session (on page 6). Really hard-hitting program there. [International Association of Young Lawyers]

    * Congratulations to the 49 firms honored for meeting all of WILEF’s criteria for Gold Standard certification at today’s awards gala! [Women in Law Empowerment Forum]

    20 Comments / / Sep 12, 2013 at 5:01 PM
  • syria RF

    Barack Obama, Constitutional Law, Military / Military Law, Politics

    Obama’s Right To Be Wrong: Presidential Power And Military Action

    Let’s talk about who gets to decide where American forces go when push comes to shove….

    19 Comments / / Sep 12, 2013 at 11:13 AM

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