Copyright

  • cheesy

    Copyright, Deaths, Food, Gay, Movies, Murder, Music, Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 01.28.14

    * D.C. litigator Bruce Klores is living a double life as a Grilled Cheese restaurateur. He’s planning some politically-themed sandwiches, like the Boehner: “maybe if someone orders it, we’ll just say no.” [Washington Post]

    * Bryan Garner took to Twitter to announce that three neologisms by David Lat are joining Black’s Law Dictionary (affiliate link). Check out which terms made the cut for the 10th edition. [Twitter]

    * Oklahoma is chasing its proposal to ban all marriage with a bill to issue tickets electronically. Where’s the human touch of being harassed by the cops? [Overlawyered]

    * Here are the best suitcases for an overnight business trip. [Corporette]

    * We already pointed out that Quentin Tarantino is heading to court over the leaked script to The Hateful Eight. Here’s a quick rundown of the complaint. [IT-Lex]

    * A riveting account, by lawyer turned journalist Adam Teicholz, of the brutal murder that shook the gay community in a small Louisiana town. [Vanity Fair]

    * Crude oil is transported by rail, and those railroads have safety regulations. [Breaking Energy]

    * RIP Pete Seeger. I know he was a folk singer rather than a lawyer, but he wrote a song called “New York J-D Blues,” which sums up Biglaw in this town. [Volokh Conspiracy / Washington Post]

    0 Comments / / Jan 28, 2014 at 5:18 PM
  • SONY DSC

    American Bar Association / ABA, Copyright, Free Speech, Health Care / Medicine, Law Schools, Movies, Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 01.27.14

    * Opera singer who can’t sing without farting sues for $2.5 million. She should try blaming it on the phantom. [Gawker]

    * Speaking of Gawker, Elie has an article up about last night’s Grammy ceremony over at our new outpost in Gawkerville, the ATL Redline. [ATL Redline]

    * Amazingly, adding Elie’s perspective wasn’t the worse thing to happen to Gawker this week: Quentin Tarantino has decided to sue them for publishing copies of his latest script, The Hateful Eight. [Grantland]

    * Everyone’s favorite Harvard Law transcript forger cum insider trading defendant, Matthew Martoma, just can’t catch a break — the government is trying to get a couple of key defense experts tossed. [The Expert Institute]

    * Should bloggers out pseudonymous commenters? No, because… free speech? Whatever, bloggers aren’t the government. [Ramblings on Appeal]

    * The ABA’s Task Force on the Future of Legal Education thinks schools should cut costs and prepare students for legal careers. Welcome to the ATL Family! [Chronicle of Higher Education]

    * It’s an old adage but it bears repeating: if you want to win a negotiation, be prepared to go to trial. [Katz Justice]

    * An update on Stephen Glass, the plagiarizing journalist applying for admission to the California bar. Want to know what happened to his application? Click on….

    Spoiler alert: He doesn’t get in.

    2 Comments / / Jan 27, 2014 at 5:30 PM
  • 6E0jjtS-RF

    Copyright, Technology

    Copyright Week: Open Access As The Antidote To Privatizing Knowledge And Learning

    Once upon a time copyright was meant to encourage learning — now it encourages ripping off taxpayers for fun and profit.

    4 Comments / / Jan 17, 2014 at 10:25 AM
  • superfly

    Clerkships, Copyright, Drinking, Non-Sequiturs, Police, Sex, Technology

    Non-Sequiturs: 01.13.14

    * A pimp is suing Nike for not labeling its shoes as dangerous weapons after the sex work entrepreneur used his Jordans to beat the holy hell out of a john. Good luck with your suit, Superfly! [USA Today]

    * Tattoo artists are suing over their artwork getting featured in media without getting compensation. So add “because shooting ink through a damn needle into your skin” as a reason never to get a tattoo. [Infringe That!]

    * There was a dream that was the law clerk hiring plan. Well, it’s dead now. [OSCAR]

    * Comparing strippers to lawyers. Makes sense. [Miami Herald]

    * Across the Pond, a Cambridge College masturbator gets punished. I see what you did there, you clever headline writer, you. [The Tab]

    * Boston has stopped using license plate scanners to probe the question, “Are these even worth it?” That’s the sort of question they might have wanted to explore before spending all that money. [IT-Lex]

    * A Pennsylvania lawyer was busted for selling wines out of his wine cellar without a license. God, liquor laws are stupid. [Philly.com]

    * Congratulations to the LGBT Bar Association’s 2014 Community Vision awardees: Mary Bonauto, Brian Ellner, and Credit Suisse. [LGBT Bar Association of Greater New York]

    0 Comments / / Jan 13, 2014 at 5:29 PM
  • letter shock

  • 200px-Seuss-cat-hat-RF

    Copyright, Intellectual Property, Technology

    The Grinch Who Stole The Public Domain

    A number of classics should have entered the public domain on Wednesday. Well, a number of classics and Atlas Shrugged.

    6 Comments / / Jan 3, 2014 at 12:25 PM
  • iStock_000031859180XSmall

    Copyright, Movies, Non-Sequiturs, Technology

    Non-Sequiturs: 12.31.13

    Ed. note: Happy New Year! We will resume our normal publication schedule on January 2nd. See you next year.

    * A guy got pantsed twice. He then secured a six-figure judgment! And now he’s appealing that judgment!?!? God, this is exactly the kind of guy who deserves a wedgie. [Lowering the Bar]

    * Professor Campos takes on George Will’s claim that the team name Redskins isn’t offensive because “Oklahoma” basically translates to “Redskin” too. Hey, I could get behind banning Oklahoma. [Lawyers, Guns & Money]

    * A pro se inmate sues the state. The reporter tries really hard to treat the complaint seriously until the very end. [Times-Picayune]

    * A Las Vegas judge (and son of a former mayor) suffered head wounds indicative of an assault. When asked about why LVMPD didn’t tell marshals that a judge had been attacked, they basically said, “Why would we?” Yeah, why alert a judge’s security team about a possible, persistent threat related to his job. [Las Vegas Law Blog]

    * With Netflix about to purge a number of movies off its system, this is an interesting look back at a time when Hollywood tried to ban home movie rental because they generally adhere to the “cut off your nose to spite your face” business model. [Tech Crunch]

    * More on the phenomenon of judges speaking out publicly. I don’t know about all these critics, but we’re sure big fans of these judges. [Wall Street Journal]

    0 Comments / / Dec 31, 2013 at 2:51 PM
  • This is sterner talking to than Lanny Breuer gave HSBC.

    3rd Circuit, Copyright, Dahlia Lithwick, Drugs, Guns / Firearms, Movies, Non-Sequiturs, War on Terror

    Non-Sequiturs: 12.30.13

    * You can go to jail for possession, but if you actively aid and abet drug cartels, you can walk away with a fine worth 5 weeks of your income. It also helps if instead of “poor” you’re a bank. Hooray for “Too Big To Hold Accountable For Anything!!! [Rolling Stone]

    * Disney has gotten fed up with “mockbusters,” films that jack the studio’s logo to confuse people into buying a different DVD. Now if you’ll excuse me, I’ve been itching to check out this new flick September: Osage County. [Jezebel]

    * Dahlia Lithwick explains that too many schools feel the cure for the trauma of school shootings is… creating more trauma. [Slate]

    * Chief Judge Theodore McKee of the Third Circuit rules that the government can detain you for carrying Arabic flashcards. This doesn’t even make racist profiling sense: “bad guys” would already know how to speak Arabic, right? [The Raw Story]

    * Defendants need to understand that getting an acquittal requires them to expend some personal effort, too. [Katz Justice]

    0 Comments / / Dec 30, 2013 at 4:34 PM
  • 434px-MerryOldSanta-RF

    Copyright, Music, Technology

    Santa Claus Is Coming To Town… And EMI Is Keeping The Copyright

    Santa Claus is coming to town… and EMI owns him.

    5 Comments / / Dec 20, 2013 at 12:10 PM
  • 437px-Michael_R_Bloomberg

    Animal Law, Copyright, Crime, Labor / Employment, Law Schools, Music, Non-Sequiturs, Sex, Technology

    Non-Sequiturs: 12.16.13

    * Mayor Bloomberg is filing suit to overturn New York’s Living Wage law, because wasting a bunch of money pursuing a lawsuit for the last two weeks of his term is the kind of efficiency he brings to the table as a biznessmun. [DNAInfo]

    * Judge Richard Leon puts the NSA metadata surveillance program on ice. Looks like someone’s going to get bugged. [Slate]

    * Someone’s asking for a fake college transcript in Baton Rouge. Pretty sure LSU’s athletic department could give you a hand. [Law and More]

    * Considering the polygamy ruling in Utah, here’s an interesting analysis of the constitutionality of bestiality laws. This seems like an appropriate place to link this song about a guy who broke into the Lincoln Park zoo in Chicago. [The Volokh Conspiracy]

    * Here’s a fun game: replace the name of the school and the course of study and marvel at how easily it could pass for an article Elie wrote. [Huffington Post]

    * These folks got smacked with a cybersquatting charge because they used a logical domain name to publicize an ongoing dispute. It’s a lot easier to sue people than to build a solid home. [IT-Lex]

    * In sad news, the victim in a recent carjacking-related killing was Dustin Friedland, a Syracuse law grad who worked with Adam Leitman Bailey. Our thoughts are with the Friedland family. [NY Daily News]

    * The Beastie Boys are suing GoldieBlox over the latter’s viral ad set to a parody of “Girls.” Unlike GoldieBlox, NYU Law professor Chris Sprigman doesn’t need an elaborate Rube Goldberg machine to burst the Beastie Boys’ bubble. Video embedded after the jump… [Bloomberg Law via YouTube]

    0 Comments / / Dec 16, 2013 at 5:16 PM
  • Amanda Knox

    Copyright, Health Care / Medicine, Law Schools, Midsize Firms / Regional Firms, Morning Docket, Murder, Music, Pets, Religion, SCOTUS, State Judges, Supreme Court, Trials

    Morning Docket: 11.27.13

    * Oh baby (or the lack thereof): the Supreme Court has decided to take on two of the cases asserting religious challenges to the Affordable Care Act’s contraception coverage mandate. [Blog of Legal Times]

    * “[H]e has a Rolodex like a Ferris wheel.” Delaware’s Supreme Court Chief Justice is retiring from the bench to join Potter Anderson & Corroon, where that Rolodex will come in handy. [Wall Street Journal]

    * Italian prosecutors think Amanda Knox should be convicted of murder (again) and given a 30-year sentence in a retrial she’s not even there for. This kind of sounds like it’d be a double-secret conviction. [CNN]

    * With fall finals right around the corner, law students can take comfort in the fact that next week they’ll be soothed by therapy dogs — ones that’ll need therapy after dealing with law students. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * If you’re considering applying to law school against all odds, you should determine when the right time to apply would be. Don’t listen to your parents, listen to your gut. [Law Admissions Lowdown / U.S. News]

    * If you haven’t heard, the Beastie Boys are having a copyright fight with toymaker GoldieBlox over a parody of the song “Girls” that’s been used in a commercial. Fair use? Decide after the jump. [NBC News]

    11 Comments / / Nov 27, 2013 at 9:08 AM
  • Office_Depot_Corporate

    Copyright, Technology, Trademarks

    Office Depot Sends World’s Worst DMCA Notice To Reddit

    Companies should recognize when complaining is worse than just letting it go.

    9 Comments / / Nov 8, 2013 at 1:01 PM
  • 320px-Beastieboys-sonar

    Copyright, Intellectual Property, Music, Quote of the Day

    Saying ‘Dope!’ Does Not Provide A Legally Cognizable License To Ill

    Beastie Boys sabotage Monster Energy’s defense in intellectual property suit.

    3 Comments / / Nov 5, 2013 at 1:17 PM
  • 200px-FettbobaJB

    2nd Circuit, Arthur Miller, Copyright, D.C. Circuit, Joe Biden, Non-Sequiturs, Politics, Shira Scheindlin, Supreme Court

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.31.13

    * The Second Circuit has remanded the New York Stop and Frisk decision, demanding that a new judge hear the case. Among the reasons: that Judge Shira Scheindlin gave “media interviews and public statements purporting to respond publicly to criticism of the District Court.” So basically, act like a contemptuous prick in the press and when the judge calmly reaffirms her impartiality, get her thrown off the case. Thankfully this will all stop being an issue on about January 1, 2014. [U.S. Courts]

    * Attorney networking and referral site wireLawyer gave itself a Halloween makeover. Personally I wouldn’t want a Fett as an attorney — they have a tendency to lose their heads or fall into pits of despair. Screenshot if you check out the site after they’ve moved on to what we can only assume is their All Saints Day makeover. [wireLawyer]

    * Joe Biden’s niece appeared in court after she clashed with police last month, “swinging at a female officer then slapping another” before being dragged away in handcuffs all while touting how she “studied law.” This actually sounds more like something Joe Biden’s Onion persona would do. [NY Post]

    * Penn Law is sporting pumpkins carved with the likeness of all nine Supreme Court justices. [Under the Button]

    * Vivia Chen’s epic fail as a mother on Halloween. We still love you. [The Careerist]

    * The House of Representatives has now introduced a use restriction on videos of House hearings to prevent the footage from being used for political purposes. That doesn’t sound all that legal. The Republicans just desperately don’t want people to know what they actually do at “work.” [Patently-O]

    * Meanwhile, the Senate GOP is going filibuster on Patricia Millett’s nomination to the D.C. Circuit despite lacking any objection to her. [Huffington Post]

    * NYU Law carried on its annual tradition of acting out the Erie case. Screw that! They should act out Palsgraf…

    6 Comments / / Oct 31, 2013 at 5:09 PM
  • Bill Cosby

    Biglaw, Copyright, Fashion, Law Reviews, Non-Sequiturs, State Judges

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.23.13

    * Police called in to find out who stole the Jell-O from the office fridge. I’m not sayin’, but Bill Cosby has been lurking around the copier. [Lowering the Bar]

    * Notorious troll, Prenda Law, is hopping mad that its financial data might be entered into evidence. It has a bunch of (conflicting) reasons why this shouldn’t happen. [Ars Technica]

    * New York now has a law protecting child models. The fashion industry will have to be content only torturing adults with body dysmorphic disorder. [Fashionista]

    * San Francisco is adopting e-filing. Unfortunately, the system may carry with it a stain akin to a poll tax. [Post & Found]

    * How to dazzle at meetings — without wearing glitter. [Corporette]

    * The proposed amendment to raise the retirement ages of judges doesn’t make a whole lot of sense. [WiseLawNY]

    * With all the talk about whether law reviews are worth it or not, here’s a gathering of major law review publishing agreements. [PrawfsBlawg]

    * Why aren’t more women rising to the top of Biglaw? [The Broad Experience]

    1 Comment / / Oct 23, 2013 at 5:02 PM
  • Transportation_Security_Administration_officer_screening_a_bag

    Constitutional Law, Copyright, Gay, Harvard Law Review, Law Professors, Law Reviews, Law Schools, Non-Sequiturs, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.15.13

    * Airport security has forbidden joking about bombs and hijacking. Now TSA is cracking down on joking about TSA itself. In the interest of my next flight, “I love you, TSA!” [Daily Mail]

    * A detailed analysis of the 14th Amendment’s role in the debt ceiling debate. President Obama should employ this solution now before the Supreme Court realizes there’s another part of the 14th Amendment they can overturn. [Main Street]

    * Law school professors do not take kindly to your antics. [Law Prof Blog]

    * A Cooley Law professor is arguing against gay rights. Sorry, a Western Michigan Law professor is arguing against gay rights. [Pride Source]

    * The rules don’t apply to Yale or Harvard. Or at least the rules don’t apply to their law reviews. [Professor Bainbridge]

    * Congress is still trying to decide how to regulate FM radio instead of looking at salient issues in modern copyright law. Given how brilliantly they keep the government open, maybe FM radio is the biggest issue we should give them right about now. [The Daily Caller]

    * The lawyer as generalist is fading into obscurity. Let’s commemorate it in poetry, shall we? [Poetic Justice]

    * A preview of some upcoming Supreme Court cases this week. Complete with cartoons! [The Spark File]

    * Finally, here’s a little gem for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg fans that we got….

    12 Comments / / Oct 15, 2013 at 5:02 PM
  • iStock_000005864006XSmall

    Associate Advice, Copyright, Jersey Shore, Jury Duty, Law Schools, Lawrence Lessig, Movies, Non-Sequiturs, Television

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.01.13

    * A California judge sentenced a man to 53 years in prison and then officiated his wedding. So she gave him 53 years followed by a life sentence? Hey ho! [CBS News]

    * Jersey Shore’s The Situation suffers the indignity of a legal defeat. I mean, if he has dignity left. [South Florida Lawyers]

    * Who would make a better juror: a non-citizen or Charlie Sheen? I’d prefer to have Sheen… I don’t know if there are many crimes he wouldn’t understand. [The Atlantic]

    * The results are in from Kaplan’s just completed 2013 survey of law school admissions officers. The headline is that 54 percent of law school admissions officers report cutting their entering law school classes for 2013-2014 and 25 percent plan to do so again next year. Time to build another law school! [Kaplan Test Prep]

    * A comprehensive list of the crimes committed by Batman in Batman Begins. And I’m not entirely sure everything he did in his hostile takeover of Wayne Enterprises was on the up-and-up either. [Salt Lake Tribune]

    * Here’s a list of online resources for new attorneys. Here’s another helpful one. [Associate’s Mind]

    * An attorney bit his 3-year-old son. Hurray for bath salts! [KRQE]

    * A record label threatened to sue a guy. Unfortunately for them they threatened to sue Professor Lawrence Lessig. [NPR]

    * Student loan default rates are at the highest level in 20 years. Seems like a sustainable model. [Chronicle of Higher Education]

    * The recycling of policy debaters into litigators brings good and bad habits to the legal profession. On the plus side, there’s the refined research skills. On the other hand, stenographers have a hard time keeping up. [Houston Law Review]

    * The new song “Lady Justice” by lawyer-artist DNA (featuring Zoha). He’s already figured out that all the good songs these days have to be “featuring” someone. Song after the jump…

    0 Comments / / Oct 1, 2013 at 4:58 PM
  • GOT RF

    Copyright, Intellectual Property, Law Schools, Technology

    Law School Network Becomes Just Latest Thing The Lannisters Ruined

    Winter Is Comi… [Download Exceeded Bandwidth]

    6 Comments / / Sep 20, 2013 at 5:01 PM