Cybersecurity

  • Data RF

    Finance, Technology

    Lawmakers Query Banks About Data Security

    Suffered a cyber attack over the last year? Members of Congress want to hear about it, and all financial institutions should be prepared to competently respond to government inquiries if they are a victim of data breach.

    / Dec 18, 2014 at 12:53 PM
  • keyboard typing

    Technology

    Coming To Your Computer Soon? Ransomware Which Locks Your Files And Demands Payment

    Alarms are going off around the Internet with an apparent increase of ransomware which “immediately makes its presence known by encrypting files and demanding payment for the keys to unlock them.”

    / Dec 15, 2014 at 11:27 AM
  • Captainamerica1

    Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 12.04.14

    Captainamerica1* Finally something with bipartisan support. Nazis are bad. [Lowering the Bar]

    * 80 year old law student graduates. We would say he’ll literally being paying this off for the rest of his life, but… England. [Legal Cheek]

    * Elie was in the paper today! [New York Daily News]

    * Yesterday we had a partner admitting law firms are targets for hackers. Maybe those hackers should take on the geniuses at Sony. [Gawker]

    RELATED STORIES
    My Journey From Biglaw to SmallLaw
    More Bad Cybersecurity News – Top-Tier Malware Regin Used for Spying Since 2008
    Morning Docket: 12.04.14
    * Looking for a cool job? Here’s one. Seriously, this looks like a great gig for someone looking to get into altLaw. [Diligence Engine]

    * Biglaw runs up big bills. Really big bills. [Last Honest Lawyer]

    * Blast from the past: patent pendency in 1993. [Patently O]

    3 Comments / / Dec 4, 2014 at 5:00 PM
  • iStock_000034245758_Large

    Technology

    More Bad Cybersecurity News – Top-Tier Malware Regin Used for Spying Since 2008

    Symantec reported the discovery of new malware named Regin whose main purpose “is intelligence gathering and it has been implicated in data collection operations against government organizations, infrastructure operators, businesses, academics, and private individuals.” On November 24, 2014 Symantec issued a report entitled “Regin: Top-tier espionage tool enables stealthy surveillance” which is a “back door-type Trojan, …a complex piece of malware whose structure displays a degree of technical competence rarely seen” which has “been used in systematic spying campaigns against a range of international targets since at least 2008.”

    / Dec 4, 2014 at 10:52 AM
  • cigarette

    Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 12.03.14

    * As we’ve addressed, the grand jury declined to indict the officer in the police-cause homicide — per the medical examiner — of Eric Garner. [New York Times]

    * This is a good time to remember Eric Garner was killed for the horrible crime of selling loosies, a product that developed a black market in NYC in response to rising cigarette taxes. Evading cigarette taxes should be a crime. But, like, a “here’s your $50 ticket” crime, not the death penalty. [Huffington Post]

    * An anonymous Georgetown law student has filed suit against the school and one of its instructors, Rabbi Barry Freundel, for “luring her to the bath as part of her studies at the school.” And who didn’t have that lesson in Civ Pro? [Washington Post]

    * Another in the continuing series looking back on a decade of Chief Justice Roberts. This time looking back at the slow and steady drive to curtail women’s rights. [Constitutional Accountability Center]

    * Remember the woman suing the owner of the dog that her dogs killed? She’s dropped her suit. [ABC News]

    * The Bar Association of San Francisco is hosting an event next Tuesday featuring Chief Judge Alex Kozinski entitled: The Wizard of Koz. Um, may not be the best time to use to “Cos” sound in a title. But that aside, it promises to be an interesting event if you’re in the area. [San Francisco Bar]

    * Brian Finch of Pillsbury Winthrop talks cyberattacks and admits what everyone else wants to deny: law firms are a weak link in cybersecurity. [Bloomberg TV]

    10 Comments / / Dec 3, 2014 at 5:15 PM
  • IphoneforArticle

    Technology

    Bring Your Own Challenges

    From reliable surveys and less dependable anecdotes in most major markets, including the UK and the US, opinions point to the almost inevitable expansion of BYOD – Bring Your Own Device – as a cost-saving model for employers. Mobile device providers assure company decision-makers that direct savings will flow by avoiding the cost of purchasing handsets and absorbing service plan fees.

    / Dec 2, 2014 at 9:58 AM
  • online keyboard

    Technology

    Darkhotel Cyberattacks Business Executives in Hotels

    Kaspersky identifies that Darkhotel is a group of attackers that “seems to know in advance when these individuals will arrive and depart from their high-end hotels. So, the attackers lay in wait until these travelers arrive and connect to the Internet.”

    / Nov 19, 2014 at 5:18 PM
  • The hacker

    Technology

    Obama Administration the Target of Hackers; Former Administration Official Recipient of Subpoena Related to Cybersecurity

    The Obama Administration’s handling of cyber and data security was recently brought into question due to two distinct security incidents. On the same day that a former Administration official received a subpoena related to the security of a government-run website, it was confirmed that hackers had targeted an unclassified computer network used by senior White House staff.

    On Tuesday, October 28, House Science, Space and Technology Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-TX) and Oversight Subcommittee Chairman Paul Broun (R-GA) issued a subpoena to former U.S. Chief Technology Officer Todd Park. The subpoena compels Mr. Park to appear before the Subcommittee on Oversight to answer questions regarding his role in developing and evaluating the operations and security of HealthCare.gov, the website set up for the federal health insurance exchange created by the Affordable Care Act. Recently, it was reported that HealthCare.gov had been hacked back in July 2014. Federal officials confirmed that hackers broke into part of the website and were able to upload malicious software. However, no evidence was found that consumers’ personal data were taken.

    / Nov 17, 2014 at 10:09 AM
  • Morgan Lewis small

    7th Circuit, Antonin Scalia, Crime, Football, Non-Sequiturs, Religion, Richard Posner, Supreme Court, Technology

    Non-Sequiturs: 11.14.14

    * Morgan Lewis approves the Bingham deal, with 227 of the roughly 300 Bingham partners moving over as full partners. Morgan Lewis is calling it a “mass lateral move,” which is the nice way of telling the remaining 70+ partners (and whatever associates and staffers they don’t care to include) to enjoy early retirement. [American Lawyer; WSJ Law Blog]

    * A follow up report on the horrific story of the lawyers accused of stabbing a managing partner and his wife. [Washington Post]

    * Justice Scalia realizes that strict constructionists are just jerks. [The Onion]

    * When the title of the story uses the phrase “super-drunk judge”… [Seattle Post-Intelligencer]

    * Judge Posner took a detour into Jewish theology, apparently based on scholarly research from “Google” and “Wikipedia.” In his defense though, he thought he was citing the well-known Hebrew texts of “Elgoog” and “Aidepikiw.” [The Jewish Daily Forward]

    * It may sound like a terrible horror movie, but “Darkhotel” is actually a campaign of cyberattacks against business executives logging in from their high-end hotels. [Internet, Information Technology & e-Discovery Blog]

    * Um, Florida State may care so much about their (number 3) football team they gloss over criminal activity. And this article is NOT about Jameis Winston. [New York Times]

    * Linda Greenhouse. Damn. “In decades of court-watching, I have struggled — sometimes it has seemed against all odds — to maintain the belief that the Supreme Court really is a court and not just a collection of politicians in robes. This past week, I’ve found myself struggling against the impulse to say two words: I surrender.” [New York Times]

    * If you’re in L.A. tonight, check out the 6th Annual Justice Jam, celebrating “A Tradition of Advocacy” at 5:30 p.m. at La Plaza De Cultura y Artes. The event benefits Community Lawyers, Inc., an organization working to promote access to affordable legal services for low- and moderate-income individuals. [Community Lawyers, Inc.]

    14 Comments / / Nov 14, 2014 at 5:04 PM
  • Technology today's tech

    eDiscovery

    “Reasonable Inquiry”: Complying With Rule 26(g) In The Age Of Technology

    There can be little debate that electronically stored information (“ESI”) has altered the landscape of discovery in civil litigation. The number of devices that transmit or store electronic data as well as the volume of data in existence have increased exponentially in recent years. The rules and underlying principles governing discovery in civil litigation, however, remain largely unchanged. In light of the voluminous available data and the myriad of methods for storing and accessing such data, attorneys should examine their normal practice of gathering information responsive to discovery requests and subject to disclosure, especially when ESI is involved, so they do not fun afoul of their obligations under Rule 26(g).

    / Oct 31, 2014 at 11:11 AM
  • keyboard typing

    Technology

    Cybersecurity Litigation Monthly Newsletter

    Significant Case Developments

    P.F. Chang’s Seeks Dismissal of Data Breach Class Actions, Arguing the Existence of an Express Contract and Lack of Damages Preclude Claims
    Lewert v. P.F. Chang’s China Bistro, Inc., No. 1:14-cv-04787 (N.D. Ill.).

    As we described in July and September, P.F. Chang’s was hit with three putative class actions following its announcement of a point-of-sale data breach. On August 29, P.F. Chang’s moved for dismissal of the first two cases, now consolidated in the Northern District of Illinois. In their complaints, plaintiffs John Lewert and Lucas Kosner alleged that by failing to safeguard customer information, P.F. Chang’s breached an implied contract and violated consumer protection laws. The plaintiffs did not bring a breach of express contract claim. P.F. Chang’s argues that the plaintiffs acknowledge the existence of an express contract by alleging that “a portion of the services [they] purchased” at P.F. Chang’s was “compliance with industry-standard measures” for data security and that they were “deprived of the full monetary value of [their] transaction.”

    0 Comments / / Oct 23, 2014 at 5:34 PM
  • keyboard typing

    In-House Counsel, Technology

    Cyber Liability Insurance: Where’s the Beef?

    “Cyber liability insurance” is often used to describe a range of insurance policies, in the same way that the word cyber is used to describe a broad range of information security related tools, processes and services. Everyone is talking about the need for “stand alone” cyber liability insurance policies. These stand-alone cyber liability insurance policies basically cover expenses related to the management of a breach, e.g, the investigation, remediation, notification and credit checking. However, cyber liability coverage is also found in some existing insurance policies, including kidnap and ransom and professional liability coverage. There may also be some limited coverage through a crime policy if electronic theft is added to that policy.

    / Oct 7, 2014 at 12:08 PM
  • Online Password

    In-House Counsel, Technology

    Your Client is Hacked and Personal Information is Leaked Online – Now What?

    You are general counsel to a company, and your CEO steps into your office, clutching his iPhone in one hand and wiping sweat from his brow with the other, and tells you that a compromising photograph of him was stolen from his phone and posted online. You start thinking not if, but when, shareholders will discover this embarrassment, how much it will cost the company and what legal action to take.

    / Sep 30, 2014 at 9:52 AM
  • anonymous lawyer RF

    Cyberlaw, Technology

    John Doe Can Remain Anonymous and Not Be Deposed in Pre-Litigation Discovery

    Since the plaintiff did not a file a lawsuit against John Doe, the Texas trial court had no jurisdiction to allow the plaintiff to take the deposition of “Trooper,” an anonymous blogger who launched on on-line attack on the CEO of a company who lives in Houston.

    / Sep 25, 2014 at 10:52 AM
  • STATS image

    Conferences / Symposia, Lexis-Nexis, LexisNexis / Lexis-Nexis, Technology

    Stats Of The Week: #ILTA14 Edition

    A round-up of the top statistical tweets from the ILTA conference.

    1 Comment / / Sep 5, 2014 at 4:16 PM
  • Jennifer_Lawrence_at_the_83rd_Academy_Awards_crop-RF

    Celebrities, Privacy, Technology

    Why Jennifer Lawrence’s Leaked Nude Photos Should Be Important to Lawyers

    What lessons can lawyers learn from this unfortunate episode?

    22 Comments / / Sep 2, 2014 at 12:13 PM
  • Ajay-Patel-HighQ-picture-300x326-RF

    Advertising, Ask the Experts, Shameless Plugs, Technology, This Is an Ad

    The ATL Tech Interrogatories: 7 Questions With Ajay Patel From HighQ

    ATL Tech Interrogatories asks Ajay Patel of HighQ seven questions about legal technology.

    / Aug 7, 2014 at 3:30 PM
  • img-drew-lewis (1)

    Advertising, Ask the Experts, Shameless Plugs, Technology, This Is an Ad

    The ATL Tech Interrogatories: 7 Questions With Drew Lewis From Recommind

    Drew Lewis, eDiscovery Counsel at Recommind, shares his thoughts and insights about the legal technology industry.

    / Jul 17, 2014 at 2:47 PM

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