Department of Justice

  • dead grass

    Biglaw, Crime, Death Penalty, Department of Justice, Eric Holder, Federal Government, General Counsel, Google / Search Engines, In-House Counsel, Jury Duty, Law Professors, Law Schools, Money, Morning Docket, Politics, Small Law Firms, Technology, Wall Street

    Morning Docket: 07.29.13

    * When it comes to the U.S. Congress — especially the current one, said to be the least productive and least popular in history — and federal lawmaking, “action isn’t the same as accomplishment.” [Boston Globe]

    * The Department of Justice won’t seek the death penalty against Edward Snowden, but only because the crime he’s charged with doesn’t carry that kind of punishment as an option. But oh, Eric Holder can wish. [CNN]

    * Sorry to burst your bubble, but Biglaw as we know it is on a respirator, so be prepared to recite its last rites. The New Republic’s Noam Scheiber responds to the critics of last week’s hard-hitting piece. [New Republic]

    * The grass isn’t greener on the other side right now. Revenue per lawyer rose at Biglaw firms in 2012 (up 8.5 percent), but small firms struggled (with RPL down 8.1 percent). Ouch. [National Law Journal]

    * Let me Google that for you: Hot new technology startups have been looking to lawyers who hail from the innovative internet company’s ranks when staffing their own legal departments. [The Recorder]

    * If you’re wondering why more financial crimes haven’t been prosecuted since the Wall Street meltdown of 2008, it’s probably because they’re too just difficult for most juries to understand. Comforting. [NPR]

    * In a recent interview having to do with all of the problems that law schools are currently facing, from shrinkage to joblessness, Professor Paul Campos sat down to politely say, “Told ya so.” [Denver Post]

    6 Comments / / Jul 29, 2013 at 9:13 AM
  • Steve Cohen SAC Capital

  • Sarah Jones

    Akin Gump, Biglaw, D.C. Circuit, Defamation, Department of Justice, Insurance, Job Searches, Law Firm Mergers, Morning Docket, Plaintiffs Firms

    Morning Docket: 07.09.13

    * Akin Gump partner Patricia Millett is willing to take a whopping pay cut to serve on the D.C. Circuit — from $1MM to $184K — and for that alone she should be confirmed ASAP. [National Law Journal]

    * With the number of law firm mergers in the last six months alone, we’re on a “potentially record-setting pace” for 2013. Hey, look at it this way: it’s cheaper than hiring and firing laterals. [Am Law Daily]

    * Three years later, the epic litigation between Debevoise & Plimpton and a former client continues to rage on. Now, allegations are being tossed around about a partner’s behavior. [New York Law Journal]

    * According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in June, the legal industry lost more jobs than it has in a single month since June 2011. Congrats, Class of 2013! welcome to the real world. [Am Law Daily]

    * In its defense, Standard & Poor’s claims its ratings were puffery, and that no reasonable investor would rely on them. Aww, poor widdle “sophisticated consumers of [investment information].” [Bloomberg]

    * For those of you practicing personal injury law in New York, this case is a bombshell. If you want to put the whole insurance industry on trial, follow the action here. [New York Personal Injury Law Blog]

    * Sarah Jones, the ex-cheerleader who sued TheDirty.com for defamation, was back in federal court yesterday for the beginning of her case’s retrial. What a way to start an engagement. [ABC News]

    2 Comments / / Jul 9, 2013 at 9:06 AM
  • So I says to Mabel, I says, "how do I avoid the Rule Against Perpetuities?"

    Department of Justice, Election Law, John Roberts, Labor / Employment, Non-Sequiturs, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, UVA Law

    Non-Sequiturs: 06.28.13

    * Half-Law office, Half-Barbershop. That makes sense, I’ve seen some haircuts that should be crimes. We hear they even have a $5 haircut special called “The Misdemeanor.” [New Britain Herald]

    * The editors of Ramblings on Appeal give their takes on Shelby County. Rarely has truer legal analysis been offered than characterizing Roberts’s decision as, “Oh and I have five people on my side, you only have four, so take that.” [Ramblings on Appeal]

    * UVA law professor Chris Sprigman has co-authored an op-ed calling out the NSA. Oh, that guy’s phone is getting tapped. [New York Times]

    * The Expert Institute continues to draw from popular culture to coach expert testimony. This time it’s Game of Thrones. It’s a handy set of lessons, but “Never Trust a Frey” deserved mention. [The Expert Institute]

    * The Justice Department is bringing on unpaid attorneys because slave labor is awesome and unpaid internships are never elitist and discriminatory. [Pro Publica]

    * On that note, Bar President calls for an end to unpaid 3L internships. Video after the jump…

    5 Comments / / Jun 28, 2013 at 5:12 PM
  • stack of money

    Biglaw, Department of Justice, Free Speech, Law Schools, Media and Journalism, Money, Morning Docket, NALP, National Association for Law Placement (NALP), SCOTUS, Social Media, Social Networking Websites, Supreme Court, Technology

    Morning Docket: 06.24.13

    * With a sharp focus on the Supreme Court and the legal definition of equality, only one thing’s for sure with respect to this week’s anticipated rulings: at least one group of people is probably going to get screwed. [New York Times]

    * And lest we forget, thanks to our society’s near slavish obsession with social media and knowledge on demand, we’ll salivate uncontrollably as we wait for those opinions while the justices blissfully ignore new technology. [New York Times]

    * The Justice Department charged NSA leaker Edward Snowden with espionage, and now he’s pursuing political asylum in Ecuador with the assistance of legal counsel representing WikiLeaks. [NBC News]

    * Biglaw firms are trying to strengthen their pricing power in a post-recession world, with average rate increases of 4.8% in 2012, and hourly rates soaring in New York City. [Wall Street Journal (sub. req.)]

    * There were some bright spots in the otherwise dismal NALP job numbers for the class of 2012. Biglaw hiring is up, and so are median starting salaries. Sallie Mae is pleased as punch. [National Law Journal]

    * If you’re considering law school, ask yourself these questions before applying. You should also ask yourself if you’re cool with unemployment. [Law Admissions Lowdown / U.S. News & World Report]

    * Richard Trenk, author of the “ham-fisted” cease-and-desist letter that’s been read around the world, has been honored as the New Jersey Star-Ledger’s “Knucklehead of the Week.” Congrats! [Star-Ledger]

    * There’s no solace for people who have had to pay to have their mug shot “depublished” from the internet. Sorry, the First Amendment allows people to turn a profit off your misery. [Washington Post]

    * This lawsuit over unpaid internships filed against Gawker will sting any gossip girl’s heart to the core. But really, isn’t the privilege of working for Gawker enough? This fangirl thinks so. [New York Post]

    7 Comments / / Jun 24, 2013 at 9:07 AM
  • 220px-Eric_Holder_official_portrait-RF

    Crime, Department of Justice, Eric Holder, Police, S.D.N.Y., Shira Scheindlin

    Eric Holder Wants to Stop and Frisk the NYPD

    Federal monitors for the NYPD on the table if stop and frisk declared unconstitutional.

    9 Comments / / Jun 13, 2013 at 3:59 PM
  • Edward Snowden RF

    Department of Justice, International Law

    Where Can Edward Snowden Go To Stay Above the Law?

    If the government isn’t going to be accountable to the Fourth Amendment, it’s going to end up being accountable to guys like Edward Snowden.

    55 Comments / / Jun 11, 2013 at 3:40 PM
  • Apple logo LF 2

    Antitrust, Biglaw, Books, Department of Justice, Partner Issues, Technology, Trials

    Hiring Biglaw Partner Is the First Thing Apple’s Done Right Since the iPad

    The government’s case against Apple hits a major snag when Apple’s counsel rips up the star witness.

    17 Comments / / Jun 11, 2013 at 2:26 PM
  • Not impressed.

    American Bar Association / ABA, Biglaw, Department of Justice, Job Searches, Law Schools, Money, Morning Docket, Murder, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Trials, Women's Issues

    Morning Docket: 06.11.13

    * A case of Supreme Court techciting gone wild: What happens when your book is cited in a SCOTUS opinion, but to express an opinion you’ve never endorsed before? A whole lot of irony. [New York Times]

    * The Justice Department is dropping its appeal over a federal order that would allow promiscuous prosti-tots minors to access the morning-after pill. Hooray, over-the-counter emergency contraception for all! [CNN]

    * The National Law Journal just released the most recent edition of the NLJ 350. As we saw in the Am Law 100 and 200, “economic wariness” was pervasive throughout Biglaw in 2012. [National Law Journal]

    * More women are “bringing home the bacon,” but it’s the cheap store brand because they can’t afford better. It’s been 50 years since the Equal Pay Act was signed into law, and women are still earning less money than men. [ABC News]

    * When it came time for the ABA to change the time frame for law schools to submit jobs data, it pushed the decision back till August. Adopting the wait-and-see method already, huh? [ABA Journal]

    * Jury selection has begun in the Trayvon Martin murder trial, where the verdict will hinge upon George Zimmerman’s credibility. It’s like we’re learning about trials for the first time, you guys. [Bloomberg]

    5 Comments / / Jun 11, 2013 at 9:04 AM
  • Attorney General Eric Holder

    Department of Justice, Eric Holder, Federal Government, Quote of the Day

    Like the Energizer Bunny, Eric Holder Will Keep Going, and Going, and Going…

    Reading 80,000 Verizon text messages every day can really wear you down, but Eric Holder is staying strong.

    16 Comments / / Jun 7, 2013 at 4:10 PM
  • Erika Harold

    American Bar Association / ABA, B for Beauty, Bar Exams, Cellphones, Department of Justice, Eric Holder, Federal Judges, Health Care / Medicine, Insider Trading, Job Searches, John Edwards, Kasowitz Benson, Kids, Morning Docket, Privacy

    Morning Docket: 06.06.13

    * AG Eric Holder sat down and had a little chat about what’s been going on at the Justice Department. He’s not impressed with his agency’s work, but he claims he’s not stepping down just yet. [NBC News]

    * “Can you hear me now?” Oh, Verizon, what an apropos slogan you’ve got considering the latest government scandal. The NSA has been spying on you through your phone records since late April. [Guardian]

    * Lawyers for Matthew Martoma still want more time to comb through millions upon millions of documents in their client’s insider trading case, but it seems rather pointless after a judge’s kiss of death. [Reuters]

    * Looks like she got her wish: thanks to Judge Michael Baylson, a little girl with terminal cystic fibrosis may have a better chance at getting a longer lease on life in this donor lung transplant case. [CNN]

    * Being a politician didn’t really work out so well for him, so John Edwards is going to try his hand at being a lawyer again. Just think of all of the lovely ladies he’ll be able to pick up as clients. [USA Today]

    * Speaking of former public servants who are getting back into the law, Ken Salazar will be opening the Denver office of WilmerHale — and when it comes to pay, he’s got a “very good package.” [Denver Post]

    * And not to be forgotten, famous flip-flopper Joe Lieberman will be taking his services to Kasowitz Benson. We certainly hope the firm will appreciate his superior legal mind. [WSJ Law Blog (sub. req.)]

    * The ABA is considering law school job data collection 10 months after graduation, instead of nine, because bar exam results come out so late. Like that extra month will help… [National Law Journal]

    * Erika Harold, a Harvard Law grad and ex-Sidley associate known for her reign as Miss America, is running for Congress in Illinois. What will she she do for the talent portion of the competition? [Politico]

    1 Comment / / Jun 6, 2013 at 9:09 AM
  • Eric Holder Testifies Before House Judiciary Committee

    Barack Obama, Department of Justice, Eric Holder, Federal Government, Minority Issues, Politics

    Will Obama Abandon Eric Holder Like All His Other Black Friends?

    Have African-Americans in leadership positions not named “Barack Obama” benefited from this whole “black president” thing?

    71 Comments / / May 30, 2013 at 12:02 PM
  • wade-mccree

    Department of Justice, Eugene Volokh, Fast Food, Non-Sequiturs, Sex, Sex Scandals, Women's Issues

    Non-Sequiturs: 05.21.13

    * They are livestreaming the misconduct case against Judge Wade McCree. [Detroit Free Press]

    * GW Law professor John Banzhaf is calling upon the D.C. City Council to bar local broadcasters from using the term “Redskins.” Two decades after the real emergence of “political correctness,” the “Redskins” name has held out against that all-out assault almost as long as the actual Native American society did against Phil Sheridan. [Huffington Post]

    * People are still talking about the Yahoo!/Tumblr deal, but the most important deal for the legal profession has slid under the radar. Seamless and GrubHub are merging to make all your “3 a.m. and still haven’t had dinner at the office” dreams come true. [Wall Street Journal]

    * Vivia Chen of The Careerist got some flack for suggesting that women taking their husbands’ names was a regressive trend. In (tongue-in-cheek) fairness, here are the good reasons to take your husband’s name. Example: “When you’ve been indicted or convicted.” [The Careerist]

    * U. Chicago Law scheduled finals during Memorial Day weekend… while Chicago is closing Lake Shore Drive and cutting back on public transit. UChiLawGo responds. [UChiLawGo]

    * A gospel singer is suing McDonald’s because she lost her voice. Normally I’d make fun of this, but she sounds like she has a good argument. [The Inquisitr]

    * A review of the legal issues surrounding the DOJ/AP scandal. [Volokh Conspiracy]

    * Elie explains why the racist, nasty comments we receive don’t faze us at all. [Paidcontent.org]

    * Well this is a novel use of fundraising: Speculation that Tim Lambesis (who we covered yesterday) used crowdfunding for a new Austrian Death Machine Schwarzenegger tribute album as the down payment on a hitman to murder his wife. Maybe this new album was going to have a Total Recall theme? [Metal Sucks]

    * Stephen Colbert sits down with Caplin & Drysdale’s Trevor Potter to discuss the fact that Colbert’s SuperPAC has never been approved by the IRS. Video after the jump…

    7 Comments / / May 21, 2013 at 5:32 PM
  • Righteous Indignation RF

    Barack Obama, Department of Justice, Eric Holder, Politics, Privacy, Tax Law

    Righteous Indignation: On the IRS Abuses and the Banality of Bureaucratic Evil

    Ed. note: This is the latest installment of Righteous Indignation, our new column for conservative-minded lawyers. You probably saw this week’s topic coming. Until the folks at One First Street start tossing Elie and me some fresh meat to tussle over, my indignation — righteous as it is — must be directed elsewhere. Unless EM […]

    26 Comments / / May 16, 2013 at 11:29 AM
  • 220px-JohnFK

    D.C. Circuit, Department of Justice, Non-Sequiturs, Privacy

    Non-Sequiturs: 05.14.13

    * Even JFK had mommy issues. Unfortunately, his came with possible nuclear armageddon. [Lowering the Bar]

    * Washington, D.C. is a horrible back-biting hellhole. Except for the D.C. Circuit, where Judge Tatel and Chief Judge Sentelle apparently hold weekly kumbaya circles and talk about their feelings. [Concurring Opinions]

    * Prosecutors file motions to keep George Zimmerman’s lawyers from bringing up Trayvon Martin’s past in the trial. Probably because “getting into school fights” is not particularly probative of “deserved to get murdered.” [WKMG]

    * Another look at the DOJ/AP scandal from a unique perspective: a privacy lawyer who used to be a journalist. [Inside Privacy]

    * Jones Day landed the plum job as restructuring counsel for Detroit by one “point.” [AmLaw Daily]

    * When you’re choosing an expert witness, you should really look for that elusive “part-Don Draper, part-Lois Griffin” type. [The Expert Institute]

    * This was an actual problem I encountered when I had to edit the bills of some of my colleagues. [First World Lawyer Problems]

    3 Comments / / May 14, 2013 at 5:20 PM
  • iStock_000009219766XSmall-RF

    CIA, Department of Justice, Politics

    Why Is Anyone Outraged That the DOJ Spied on the Associated Press?

    Conservatives, liberals, and reporters alike have little room to seriously complain

    23 Comments / / May 14, 2013 at 11:15 AM
  • Sad Obama

    Morning Docket

    Morning Docket: 05.14.13

    * This IRS scandal is really like a Republican’s wet dream. Obama needs to start firing people. [Washington Post] * The Department of Justice also looks pretty shady. See, it’s not the “size” of government we should worry about. It’s the power of government that leads to problems. Obama needs to start firing people! [Associated […]

    18 Comments / / May 14, 2013 at 9:17 AM
  • Casey Anthony

    2nd Circuit, American Bar Association / ABA, Bail, Bankruptcy, Biglaw, Copyright, Department of Justice, Enron, Google / Search Engines, Jeffrey Skilling, Law Schools, Money, Morning Docket

    Morning Docket: 05.09.13

    * Right about now, the Second Circuit is wondering why authors are suing Google and crying infringement over the Internet company’s e-book project, especially since digitization could benefit so many of them. [Thomson Reuters News & Insight]

    * This is the end of an era of legal battles: Jeffrey Skilling, Enron’s former chief executive officer, is getting a little shaved off the top of his 24-year prison sentence thanks to a deal with the Department of Justice. He’ll be out in 2017. [CNBC]

    * Biglaw expected to have a slow start in 2013, but no one expected it to be this slow. The latest Citi report wasn’t exactly encouraging; on average, firms saw a 0.2% increase in revenue during the first quarter. [Am Law Daily]

    * In the past decade, the American Bar Association has created six task forces to explore changing the face of legal education as we know it. Funny… nothing’s really changed. [National Law Journal]

    * Bail for Ariel Castro, the accused Cleveland kidnapper, has been set at $8 million. “Just think of how many ribs and salsa albums could be bought with that, bro,” said Charles Ramsey. [Chicago Tribune]

    * Casey Anthony had a bankruptcy hearing yesterday, but that news was overshadowed because everyone cared more about the girl who wasn’t going to get away with murder. [Orlando Sentinel]

    1 Comment / / May 9, 2013 at 9:13 AM