Energy

We are pleased to invite you to Above the Law’s “Where Energy Meets the Law” reception from 6 to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, April 10th, in Houston, Texas. We will be celebrating Breaking Media’s launch of Breaking Energy, our new site devoted to news, analysis, and discussions about the top stories in the energy sector today.

Our guest speaker will be Peter Gardett, the Managing Editor of Breaking Energy. Peter will offer some remarks on the latest trends in the energy sector and their impact on law, policy, and business. Attendees will also have the opportunity to meet the Above the Law editors, connect with peers, taste great cocktails, and sample delicious hors d’oeuvres. The event is sponsored by our friends at Access Data. Please RSVP below.

Peter Gardett

Peter Gardett, Managing Editor, Breaking Energy, has spent over a decade covering all areas of the energy industry including coal, electricity, and renewable fuels. As Senior Correspondent, and later Bureau Chief for Argus Media, he led teams developing new editorial, analytical, and pricing products for the energy and commodities industries and also covered financial news for an audience of high-level energy executives. Gardett is a graduate of St. Andrew’s University in Scotland, and is based in New York.

We are pleased to invite you to Above the Law’s “Where Energy Meets the Law” reception from 6 to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, April 10th, in Houston, Texas. We will be celebrating Breaking Media’s launch of Breaking Energy, our new site devoted to news, analysis, and discussions about the top stories in the energy sector today.

Our guest speaker will be Peter Gardett, the Managing Editor of Breaking Energy. Peter will offer some remarks on the latest trends in the energy sector and their impact on law, policy, and business. Attendees will also have the opportunity to meet the Above the Law editors, connect with peers, taste great cocktails, and sample delicious hors d’oeuvres. The event is sponsored by our friends at Access Data. Please RSVP below.

Peter Gardett

Peter Gardett, Managing Editor, Breaking Energy, has spent over a decade covering all areas of the energy industry including coal, electricity, and renewable fuels. As Senior Correspondent, and later Bureau Chief for Argus Media, he led teams developing new editorial, analytical, and pricing products for the energy and commodities industries and also covered financial news for an audience of high-level energy executives. Gardett is a graduate of St. Andrew’s University in Scotland, and is based in New York.

Opening a legal bill from DLA Piper?

Here at Above the Law, we ❤ DLA Piper. The firm makes for great copy; there’s always something funny, ridiculous, or salacious going down over there.

In fairness to DLA Piper, the craziness might not be that high on a per capita basis. DLA Piper is one of the largest law firms in the world. In the most recent Global 100 rankings, DLA took second place in both total revenue and attorney headcount.

Many of the DLA Piper stories are on the lighter side. But this latest one — involving serious allegations of overbilling, apparently supported by internal DLA emails saying things like “churn that bill, baby!” — is no laughing matter….

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Overbilling Gone Wild: Paying the (DLA) Piper”

Springfield, Massachusetts, is a city that’s home to the Basketball Hall of Fame, and my alma mater, Western New England University School of Law. I had the (dis)pleasure of living in Springfield for five years, and from earthquakes to tornadoes to purse snatchings, I thought that I had seen it all. Boy, was I wrong!

Apparently I escaped the slums of downtown Springfield just in time to avoid a stripper explosion (not an actual stripper explosion; that would be glittery and fabulous). No, as you may have heard over the holiday weekend, there was a massive natural gas explosion in Springfield that leveled a strip club, damaging numerous other buildings in the city’s entertainment district, about two blocks over from my old apartment.

At first, no one knew what could have caused the gas leak that triggered the blast, but now fingers are being pointed every which way. This may sound like a 1L Torts hypothetical, but who’s liable for the explosion?

Did the strippers grind so hard on the pole that they ignited a spark that set the blaze? Did the babies shrieking in the daycare center next door to the strip club (yes, seriously) inspire a childcare worker to light a match and burn that mother down?

Let’s get some insights from our readers on who will be held ultimately responsible for this calamity….

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Who’s Liable for This Massachusetts Strip Club Explosion?”

No, different Magic Circle.

The leading firms of the United Kingdom, the so-called Magic Circle firms, have made significant inroads into the U.S. legal market. Over the years, they’ve hired a number of high-profile lawyers away from domestic law firms. They might not have conquered New York to the same degree that they’ve dominated many other markets they’ve entered, but they’ve certainly built up significant outposts here in Gotham.

In today’s notable lateral news, though, we see partners disappearing from one Magic Circle firm and reappearing at… another Magic Circle firm. Who are the lawyers in question, and where are they going?

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Musical Chairs: From One Magic Circle Firm to Another”

That’s the question the WSJ Law Blog just asked about the [pick your favorite adjective: beleaguered / collapsing / flailing / troubled] law firm of Dewey & LeBoeuf. Today brings big, bad news for Dewey: bankruptcy superstar Martin Bienenstock is taking his practice to Proskauer Rose. He’s moving with five other partners — Philip Abelson, Irena Goldstein, Timothy Karcher, Michael Kessler, Judy Liu — and nine associates.

Dewey’s loss is Proskauer’s gain. “He is absolutely the crown jewel over there, a fantastic lawyer who will be a great partner,” a current Proskauer partner told us. “This is going to vault us into the company of Kirkland and Weil, giving us one of the top bankruptcy practices in the country. We are really thrilled.”

As you may recall, Bienenstock was a member of the five-person Office of the Chairman at Dewey. As my colleague Staci Zaretsky wondered earlier today, “Dewey seriously have one chairman again?” With Bienenstock to Proskauer, Jeffrey Kessler to Winston & Strawn, Richard Shutran to O’Melveny & Myers, and Steve Davis off to who knows where, only Charles Landgraf remains in the chairman’s office. (Note that Landgraf’s bio is still on the Dewey website.)

Bienenstock’s departure doesn’t mark the end of Dewey’s difficulties. Let’s review the latest news….

Of course we’ve added UPDATES, after the jump.

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Dewey Have Anyone Left To Turn Out the Lights?
(Plus an actual lawsuit, a possible lawsuit, and a partner’s theory of blame.)”

The revolving door continues to spin, quite furiously, at the rapidly collapsing Dewey & LeBoeuf. We mentioned some of the latest partner departures in last night’s post (which we updated again this morning).

These are major defections, which strike at the heart of what was left of the firm. In case there was any doubt after last Friday’s WARN Act notice or yesterday’s big layoffs, it may soon be time to stick a fork in LeBoeuf.

So what’s the latest word on who is going where?

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Dewey Have Any Partners Left To Be Poached? Not Many After the Latest Departures”

About two weeks ago, we covered reports about Dewey & LeBoeuf possibly shedding some of its overseas offices. We noted at the time, however, that the reports were vague, and we added that some D&L sources denied the existence of plans for closing any specific foreign office.

Well, the reports are getting increasingly detailed. Word on the street is that D&L might shutter three of its offices in the Middle East. And the firm’s Moscow office is reportedly being courted by other major U.S. law firms.

Which offices are being considered for closure? And who are Dewey’s suitors in Moscow?

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Moscow and the Middle East: Dewey Have A Problem?
(Plus more about Dewey’s loan covenants.)”

Last week, we discussed the effort by Dewey & LeBoeuf to hold on to departing partners by enforcing its 60-day notice requirement. Partners that leave without complying with the requirement can miss out on profit distributions.

Alas, the response of many partners seems to be, “So what?” Yesterday brought word of about eight partners leaving Dewey. And since our story this morning about Dewey’s tax-time troubles, even more defections have been announced.

So who are the latest lawyers to leave, and where are they going?

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Dewey Have A Way To Stop The Partner Hemorrhaging? Energy Lawyers Exit”

Gainful employment nine months after graduation, FTW.

We cover the gloom-and-doom in the legal job market quite well here at Above the Law. But there are happy stories out there too — and not just for the top graduates of top law schools.

This is the story of Fred (not his real name; he asked to remain anonymous). Fred graduated in 2011 from a well-ranked but not super-elite law school — a top 50 school, but not a top three, top six, or even “T14″ school. He was not at the top of the class, nor was he on the law review. Many of Fred’s similarly situated classmates are unemployed or underemployed, drifting from one contract-attorney or paralegal-type job to another.

Fred is much better off than many of them. He has a job that he enjoys. He works for two weeks, followed by two weeks of vacation. He makes somewhere between $60,000 and $100,000 a year, with the exact amount depending on how much he wants to work. And if things go according to plan, in a few years he could be earning $250,000 a year (or more).

Right now some of you are dying to know: What does Fred do, and how can I get this job?

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Career Alternatives for Attorneys: Truck Driver”

Page 3 of 41234