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  • lindsay lohan rehab mug shot

    Celebrities, Constitutional Law, Crime, D.C. Circuit, Facebook, Law Professors, Law Reviews, Law School Deans, Law Schools, Lindsay Lohan, Non-Sequiturs, Politics, Religion, Rudeness, Shopping, Weddings

    Non-Sequiturs: 03.22.13

    * So, after being shut down for more than two years, Caitlin Halligan asked President Obama to withdraw her nomination to the D.C. Circuit. This is how democracy works in our country, folks, and it’s pretty sad. [People For the American Way; Post Politics / Washington Post]

    * In America, we’re trying to get official recognition for gay marriage. In Scotland, they’re trying to get official recognition for weddings performed by Jedi Knights. Please, by all means, proceed to stroke each other’s lightsabers over this exciting nerd news. [Volokh Conspiracy]

    * Oh my god, this is something I’m definitely going to have to sit down and read, it looks so salacious and — oh. *eyeroll* This just in from the subtitle letdown department…. [Overlawyered]

    * A political consultant in Nebraska apparently got himself fired because he called Sen. Danielle Conrad a C-U-Next-Tuesday on his Facebook page. That was way harsh, Tai. [Jezebel]

    * Click here to listen to Professor Brian Tamanaha and Dean Lawrence Mitchell talk about rethinking the future of legal education. Tamanaha thinks the tuition is too damn high, whereas Dean Mitchell simply thinks that “life is expensive.” Not even kidding, he really said that. [Associate’s Mind]

    * At Target, you can definitely expect more and pay less, but that’s probably because your money’s allegedly being stolen out of the cash register. [Legal Juice]

    * And just because I love just about everything that Lindsay Lohan does because she’s the hottest of all messes, here’s a timeline of her mug shots ranked in order of her sex appeal. I love that we live in a world where such a thing actually exists! [Gawker]

    6 Comments / / Mar 22, 2013 at 4:29 PM
  • dislike button

    Attorney Misconduct, Bankruptcy, Biglaw, Constitutional Law, Facebook, Federal Judges, Guns / Firearms, Insider Trading, Morning Docket, Partner Issues, Partner Profits, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 03.22.13

    * If you’re looking for an easy résumé line, then consider joining the Supreme Court bar, an elite organization that doesn’t check to see if its members are still alive. All you need is three years of practice, two signatures, and $200. [Associated Press]

    * Stanley Chesley, the master of disaster himself, was disbarred for his “shocking and reprehensible” conduct in a fen-phen case. His wife, U.S. District Court Judge Susan Dlott of the Southern District of Ohio, must be oh so pleased. [Courier-Journal]

    * Howrey like dem apples now? Some of Howrey’s former partners, including ex-chairman Robert Ryuak, all lined up to make deals to delay lawsuits from firm’s bankruptcy trustee, Allan Diamond. [WSJ Law Blog (sub. req.)]

    * This Biglaw firm’s future was just a little bit dimmer in 2012, with a 4.9 percent dip in profits per equity partner. This is unexpected from Milbank, a number 3 seed in our March Madness competition. [Am Law Daily]

    * The NRA’s New York affiliate filed suit challenging the state’s new gun laws, claiming that ban on assault weapons violates the Second Amendment — because this is clearly what the founders intended. [Reuters]

    * Raj Rajaratnam’s younger brother, Rengan Rajaratnam, was indicted yesterday in a federal insider-trading scheme tied to the Galleon case. You can’t fault the guy, he was just trying to keep it in the family. [Bloomberg]

    * Sorry, Dean Boland, but you’re not going anywhere. A judge denied the attorney’s request to withdraw from Paul Ceglia’s Facebook case. He must be wishing there were a dislike button now. [Law 360 (sub. req.)]

    8 Comments / / Mar 22, 2013 at 9:08 AM
  • 225px-Big_Ten_Conference_logo_(2012).svg

    Basketball, Contracts, Facebook, Football, Intellectual Property, Non-Sequiturs, Politics, Sports, Supreme Court

    Non-Sequiturs: 03.19.13

    * A Big Ten Commissioner filed a declaration claiming that the Big Ten will stop competitive collegiate athletics if Ed O’Bannon wins his lawsuit. This level of disingenuous blackmail is why we invented sanctions, people. [Sports Illustrated]

    * On the heels of a federal judge allowing service through Facebook, a Texas lawmaker wants to make service of process over Facebook the rule rather than the exception. [IT-Lex]

    * The next time you feel embarrassed by a U.S. politician, note that this Japanese city council member refuses to remove his wrestling mask. America doesn’t have anyone that clownish in office… she resigned the governorship in 2009. [Lowering the Bar]

    * Everyone always talks about plain language contracts. Here’s how someone actually wrote “Terms and Conditions” that a user might actually read. [Associate’s Mind]

    * Once again, the Supreme Court comes down to the Breyer-Thomas coalition against the Scalia-Ginsburg coalition. [ABA Journal]

    * Slate’s Jessica Grose weighs in on the suicide of Cynthia Wachenheim reported here last week. [Slate]

    * And here, just for fun, see if you can guess who said these quotes: Spongebob Squarepants or Friedrich Nietzsche. Surprisingly harder than you’d think. [Buzzfeed]

    2 Comments / / Mar 19, 2013 at 5:31 PM
  • Facebook image-RF

    Facebook, S.D.N.Y., Service of Process, Technology, Twittering

    A Sure Way to Unfriend Someone — Serve Them Through Facebook

    The S.D.N.Y. allows service through Facebook in one case. Check your FB events for the party called, “Federal Prosecution.”

    8 Comments / / Mar 14, 2013 at 2:30 PM
  • Flag_of_Palestine

    Constitutional Law, Drugs, Facebook, Health Care / Medicine, Law Professors, Marijuana, Non-Sequiturs, Politics

    Non-Sequiturs: 02.20.13

    * Palestinian prisoners are smuggling spooge out of prison to make babies on the outside. The article raises some fascinating legal and ethical questions, but thankfully fails to explain the logistics of the scheme. [Bill of Health / Harvard Law Petrie-Flom Center]

    * Florida is looking into the question of whether judges and attorneys can be Facebook friends. But it’s so useful to have real-time feedback of which arguments that judge is going to “Like.” [IT-Lex]

    * The government has indicted a lawyer on charges of bankrolling a synthetic marijuana operation. So real-life Kentucky is just like Justified Kentucky. [USA Today]

    * The defense of Oscar Pistorius springs back and has a good day. [Deadspin]

    * This article about KU Law Professor Stephen Ware’s arrest on domestic abuse charges sounds bad, but he’s actually a hero for putting together an elaborate and interactive issue-spotting exam for his final. [6 News Lawrence]

    * This will be fun. What are the weirdest constitutional arguments ever asserted in court? [Volokh Conspiracy]

    * Former Senator Pete Dominici admits that he’s the father of Vegas lawyer Adam Laxalt of Lewis and Roca. While a Senator for New Mexico, Dominici was nailing the daughter of Nevada Senator Paul Laxalt… just to be neighborly. [Reno Gazette-Journal]

    2 Comments / / Feb 20, 2013 at 5:33 PM
  • Pure meth

  • facebook_logo

    Biglaw, Facebook, General Counsel, In-House Counsel, Law Schools, Social Media, Social Networking Websites

    Some Of Facebook’s First Users Work In Biglaw, But Where?

    Thanks to some expert stalking, we now know that some of Facebook’s first members became lawyers. Let’s invade their privacy and find out about them!

    13 Comments / / Feb 5, 2013 at 1:00 PM
  • facebook 180x100 RF

    Facebook, Privacy, Social Media, Social Networking Websites, Technology

    Facebook Sends Most Of America An Offer To Settle A Class Action Lawsuit For $10

    Did you get an email from Facebook about its class action settlement?

    8 Comments / / Jan 29, 2013 at 11:26 AM
  • Conferences / Symposia, Drinking, Dubious Conferences, Facebook, Glenn Reynolds, Law Professors, Law Schools, Non-Sequiturs, UVA Law, Videos

    Non-Sequiturs: 01.28.13

    * The latest bombshell in the Chevron / Ecuador litigation: an ex-judge cops to participation in a bribery scheme. [Fortune]

    * I wish this “defense” of posting one’s law school grades on Facebook were more full-throated and “in your face.” [Virginia Law Weekly]

    * I suspect Professor Stephen Bainbridge is in the minority here. Most of my law professor friends enjoy all-expenses-paid trips to the Cayman Islands. [Professor Bainbridge]

    * Professor Glenn Reynolds: “As the GOP looks for issues it can win on, how about lowering the drinking age?” I’ll raise a glass to that. [Instapundit]

    * Ahoy, mateys! Did the Supreme Court grant cert in that piracy case out of the Fourth Circuit? [FindLaw]

    * Not all liberals hate guns. [New York Times]

    After the jump, the dashing and handsome Ryan Chenevert — Cosmo’s reigning Bachelor of the Year, and a Louisiana lawyer — offers his thoughts on dating….

    Don’t you just love that southern accent?

    5 Comments / / Jan 28, 2013 at 5:11 PM
  • popped collar RF

    Facebook, Grade Reform, Law Schools, Reader Polls, Social Media, Social Networking Websites, UVA Law

    Should You Brag About Your Law School Grades On Facebook?

    Facebook is obliterating our old rules about what is and is not appropriate to talk about.

    38 Comments / / Jan 22, 2013 at 2:36 PM
  • second restatement of contracts

    American Bar Association / ABA, Clarence Thomas, Contracts, Facebook, Non-Sequiturs, SCOTUS, Sex, Sexual Harassment, Supreme Court

    Non-Sequiturs: 01.18.13

    * Is this contract for sex based on Facebook likes enforceable? [Gawker]

    * Speaking of unenforceable contracts, what in the hell does Bilbo sign before his unexpectedly long journey? [Wired]

    * And Jesus, you certainly can’t barter legal services for sex! I think everybody needs to go home and read the Second Restatement. [Indianapolis Star]

    * Now you can hear for yourself the three words that Clarence Thomas spoke. It’s at the 41 minute mark. [The Supreme Court]

    * Ms. JD is offering lawyers and law students the chance to submit questions to ABA President Laurel Bellows that will be answered at an event on January 31 (with viewing parties around the country). [Ms. JD]

    * How to answer a question when an interviewer asks you something that you don’t have to answer. [Lawyers.com]

    * Litigation can be a good excuse to get your client to do things they should have been doing all along. [What About Clients?]

    * North Carolina dean claims she was forced to underreport sexual assaults at the college. When reached for comment, the Duke Lacrosse team said, “We kind of have the opposite problem.” [Salon]

    3 Comments / / Jan 18, 2013 at 4:30 PM
  • johnny manziel RF

    Cars, Facebook, Football, Quote of the Day, State Judges, State Judges Are Clowns, Texas

    Quote of the Day: Johnny Football’s Speeding Ticket Is Totally Real… Trust Us

    A municipal judge knocks a Heisman trophy winner down a peg or two by outing him as the recipient of a speeding ticket.

    1 Comment / / Jan 18, 2013 at 3:30 PM
  • netflix

    NYSE, Securities and Exchange Commission, Securities Law, Social Media, Social Networking Websites, Technology

    SEC’s Netflix Probe Is No Blockbuster

    The SEC is probing Netflix for posting company milestones on Facebook. Calling Facebook a non-public forum sounds crazy, it’s just one more instance of the SEC failing to grasp modern technology.

    4 Comments / / Dec 12, 2012 at 6:10 PM
  • Judge Lynn Hughes

    Benchslaps, Facebook, Federal Judges, Judge of the Day, Texas

    Benchslap of the Day: Keep It Short, Sweet, and Humiliating

    This Texan judge served up a rather embarrassing benchslap. Check it out!

    15 Comments / / Dec 5, 2012 at 1:38 PM
  • law-school-gavels

    Biglaw, BP, Crime, Environment / Environmental Law, Facebook, Law Schools, Layoffs, Money, Morning Docket, Partner Issues, Sex Scandals, Student Loans

    Morning Docket: 11.29.12

    * Enjoy your Biglaw bonuses now, because according to managing partners, layoffs and de-equitizations may soon be making their return. Oh, only in Pennsylvania? Woohoo, break out the bubbly! Just kidding, that really sucks if it’s true. [Legal Intelligencer]

    * The Environmental Protection Agency has temporarily banned BP from entering into future U.S. government contracts because of the company’s “lack of business integrity,” aka the Deepwater Horizon explosion. Ouch, super sick burn, EPA! [National Law Journal]

    * Considering going to law school? Then you should also take into consideration the fact that you’ll have to become a lawyer if you want to stand a remote chance of ever being able to pay off your loans. [Fox Business]

    * Paul Ceglia pleaded not guilty to fraud charges yesterday in federal court. If only he actually owned half of Facebook as he claims, he probably wouldn’t have a court-appointed attorney representing him. [Bloomberg]

    * “No matter how many high-priced lawyers and publicists she employs, she has been exposed for what she is.” Jill Kelley’s lawyer is on the offensive, and his targets are none too pleased about it. [Associated Press]

    * Avvo has decided to sell its health business to focus entirely on providing services to lawyers and legal customers. Now the company will be able to do the law justice. (SWIDT?) [Puget Sound Business Journal]

    3 Comments / / Nov 29, 2012 at 9:07 AM
  • facebook devil

    Copyright, Facebook, Intellectual Property, Privacy, Social Media, Social Networking Websites, Technology

    Facebook Laughs as Peon Users Attempt to Reclaim Their Privacy and Copyright Interests

    Facebook’s privacy rules are changing, and people are attempting to use status updates to override the system. That doesn’t exactly compute with the real world…

    21 Comments / / Nov 27, 2012 at 1:05 PM
  • facebook handcuffs

    Crime, Deaths, Facebook, Intellectual Property, Kids, Law Schools, Mergers and Acquisitions, Morning Docket, Patents, Trademarks

    Morning Docket: 11.27.12

    * In case you missed this yesterday during the Cravath bonus-mania-palooza, David Kappos, the director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office, announced that he’d be stepping down from his position in January 2013. [Blog of Legal Times]

    * And speaking of bonuses, somebody’s not probably getting one this year, because here come the lawsuits: Hewlett-Packard just got slapped with a securities class action suit as a result of the company’s allegedly fraudulent Autonomy acquisition. [Reuters]

    * Will Penn State’s former general counsel be able to testify against Gary Schultz and Tim Curley in post-Sandusky criminal proceedings? Considering she’s “a key witness,” she better be. [Corporate Counsel]

    * Of course Vermont Law School is considering offering voluntary staff buyouts, the school has a freakin’ $3.3M budget shortfall. In other news, they’ll be upping LL.M. programs to make up the cash. [National Law Journal]

    * Paul Ceglia, the man who claims he owns half of Facebook, has been indicted on federal wire and mail fraud charges. He’ll appear in court this Wednesday, but who knows if he’ll have a lawyer by then. [Bloomberg]

    * Jay Jaffe, law firm public relations pioneer, RIP. [PRWeek]

    1 Comment / / Nov 27, 2012 at 9:06 AM
  • Casey Anthony is not impressed.

    2nd Circuit, Bankruptcy, Biglaw, California, Cellphones, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Facebook, Federal Judges, Gay Marriage, Gender, Morning Docket, Privacy, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Technology

    Morning Docket: 11.26.12

    * Will it be DOMA or Prop 8? The countdown until Friday starts now, because everyone’s waiting to see whether the Supreme Court will grant cert on one of the five same-sex marriage cases that has come before the high court. [UPI]

    * Walk like an Egyptian — or, in this case, you can protest like one. Judges and lawyers are on strike and filing legal challenges to President Mohamed Morsi’s “unprecedented attack on judicial independence.” [New York Times]

    * Dewey know when this failed firm’s bankruptcy plan will be approved? Team Togut is hoping for a February resolution, but the rascally retirees may throw a wrench in things with their committee’s continued existence. [Am Law Daily]

    * Even though the Northern District of California has a historic all-women federal bench — a courthouse of their own, if you will — there’s probably no need to tell them that THERE’S NO CRYING IN LITIGATION. No crying! [The Recorder]

    * New technology + old laws = a privacy clusterf**k. This week, a Senate committee will contemplate whether the Electronic Communications Privacy Act needs to be updated to get with the times. [New York Times]

    * The New York State Bar Association may oppose it, but Jacoby & Meyers’s challenge to the state’s ban on non-lawyer firm ownership shall live to see another day thanks to the Second Circuit. [New York Law Journal]

    * An Alabama Slammer is both a dangerous cocktail and a term for what happens when your Southern law school refuses to cut its class size and you’re left woefully unemployed after graduation. [Birmingham News]

    * Casey Anthony finds relevancy again! Girls in my high school used to search for “foolproof suffocation” on Google and later get acquitted of murdering their daughters all the time; it was no big deal. [USA Today]

    * Dean Boland, aka Paul Ceglia’s gazillionth lawyer in the Facebook ownership case, will soon find out if can withdraw as counsel. He’s got other things to deal with, like a $300K child porn judgment. [Wall Street Journal]

    0 Comments / / Nov 26, 2012 at 9:05 AM