Federal Judiciary

  • Judge J. Paul Oetken (S.D.N.Y.)

    Federal Judges, Rankings, Sponsored Content, Technology

    Judging The Judges: Who Are the Most-Cited New Jurists On The Federal Bench?

    Which federal judges get the most attention from their bench-mates: the prodigies born in the ‘70s, or the late bloomers approaching their own seventies?

    / Apr 23, 2015 at 2:46 PM
  • depressed woman

  • These chocolates come with a search warrant.

    Morning Docket

    Morning Docket: 03.16.15

    * Last week in court, a murder suspect in Louisiana apparently pooped his pants during a case status hearing, wiped said poop all over his face, and muttered to himself that “life is like a box of chocolates.” Sorry about that crappy candy, dude. [New Orleans Advocate]

    * According to early Am Law 100 data, New York’s most elite and prestigious firms have once again broken away from the rest of the pack when it comes to both revenue and partner profits. Biglaw’s best may be back to models and bottles. [Am Law Daily]

    * Michelle Lee, the first woman to ever serve as director of the USPTO, was sworn in on stage at SXSW Interactive. Michelle Lee, who worked with the Girl Scouts to issue a patent patch (instead of more makeup and sewing patches), is pretty damn awesome. [Mashable]

    * The federal judiciary has plans to decrease the word limit of appellate briefs from 14,000 to 12,500, and lawyers are pissed. Lawyers from Brown Rudnick say it could result in more acronyms, confusing construction, and less “punctilious citation,” oh my! [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Lee Smolen, the ex-Sidley Austin partner who faked $69,000 in travel expenses while at the firm (and possibly $379K more), has been suspended from practice for one year and will have to undergo psychiatric treatment. [Legal Profession Blog via ABA Journal]

    * Taking New York’s lead, California is considering requiring all would-be attorneys in the state to complete 50 hours of pro bono work within one year of being admitted. Leave it to people who don’t know what they’re doing yet to close the justice gap. [Los Angeles Times]

    29 Comments / / Mar 16, 2015 at 9:02 AM
  • lightsaber

    Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 12.18.14

    * 3D printing and lightsabers and intellectual property. [Concurring Opinions]

    * Speaking of IP law, let’s talk Santa Claus and intellectual property. [Trademark & Copyright Law Blog / Foley Hoag LLP]

    * “ExamExtensionGate” stirs up conservatives, but also a lot of liberal to moderate Boomers, because… “Lazy Millennials!” Forgetting of course that law students in the 1960s did the exact same thing. But those were mostly white kids talking about Vietnam, so it’s like… different, man. [PrawfsBlawg]

    * If you’re excited to hear this year’s annual report on the federal judiciary and can’t hardly wait until Chief Justice Roberts unleashes it upon the world, perhaps you can sate your appetite with this prebuttal. [Fix the Court]

    * The Texas judge who kicked a lawyer out of court for thoughtlessly appearing with a broken leg has earned the ire of the Dallas legal community. [Legal Juice]

    * More than 70 years later, a judge concludes that South Carolina shouldn’t have executed a 14-year-old based on a one-day trial. Took ya long enough. [WTOP]

    * Interesting academic piece on Muslims in the Antebellum South. In other news, there were Muslims in the Antebellum South. [The Faculty Lounge]

    5 Comments / / Dec 18, 2014 at 5:40 PM
  • Loretta Lynch

    Morning Docket

    Morning Docket: 12.05.14

    * A former Cleary Gottlieb associate will be a very rich man after The Lending Club, the company he founded post-Biglaw, completes its IPO. [American Lawyer]

    * Marriage equality won’t arrive in Mississippi just yet. [How Appealing]

    * The federal civil rights investigation into the death of Eric Garner could complicate Loretta Lynch’s nomination to serve as attorney general. [New York Times]

    * In other news about excessive use of force by police, the U.S. Department of Justice just blasted Cleveland’s department for abysmal record-keeping about such incidents. [Cleveland Plain Dealer]

    * And what does possible 2016 presidential candidate Hillary Clinton think about police abuses? [New York Times]

    * Non-random appellate panels in the federal courts are far more common than you might think, reports Alison Frankel. [Reuters via How Appealing]

    * A smart and thoughtful review by Rosemarie Yu of my new book, Supreme Ambitions (affiliate link). [New York Law Journal]

    * Eugene Ingoglia, one of the S.D.N.Y. prosecutors who helped send Harvard Law cheater Mathew Martoma to prison, will be joining Morvillo LLP as a partner. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * Former federal government lawyer Michael Richter: “It’s Not Top-Secret If You Can Google It.” [Wall Street Journal]

    * Congratulations to eBrevia, a legal technology company we’ve previously profiled, on raising $1.5 million in seed funding. [Law Technology News]

    18 Comments / / Dec 5, 2014 at 9:15 AM
  • mekka-don

    Bankruptcy, Biglaw, Crime, Job Searches, Kasowitz Benson, Law Professors, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Partner Issues, Partner Profits, Rap, Wall Street

    Morning Docket: 03.27.14

    * The federal judiciary is hiring for staff and public defender positions lost during the government’s sequestration throughout the better part of last year. Ready, aim, fire those résumés! [Legal Times]

    * New York Biglaw firms always manage to find their way to the top of the Am Law 100 rankings. When all’s said and done, being so close to Wall Street definitely has its perks. [Bloomberg Businessweek]

    * Absolutely no one should be alarmed about the fact that Kasowitz Benson’s profits per partner have dropped by 15 percent — well, no one but the equity partners, that is. Have fun with that. [Am Law Daily]

    * The managing partner of Jacoby & Meyers is worried people will think his personal injury firm is going under, not Jacoby & Meyers Bankruptcy. Either way, those commercials won’t die. [New York Law Journal]

    * A professor at George Mason University Law was pepper sprayed IN THE FAAAAAACE by an unknown assailant in his classroom yesterday afternoon. We’ll obvious have more on this story later. [ARLNow]

    * La Verne is the first law school to offer flat-rate tuition. There will be no scholarships and no discounts. Students will pay $25K/year, nothing more, nothing less. This is, dare we say, wise. [National Law Journal]

    * “Passion over pension.” Mekka Don, the Weil Gotshal corporate lit attorney turned rapper, just released his first CD, and it’s all about leaving Biglaw to follow his dreams. Go buy it here (affiliate link). [MTV]

    5 Comments / / Mar 27, 2014 at 9:03 AM
  • Leslie Southwick RF

    5th Circuit, Arlen Specter, Books, Federal Judges, Judicial Nominations, Politics, Senate Judiciary Committee

    ‘Give This Man A Federal Judgeship': A Review Of ‘The Nominee’ By Leslie Southwick

    Want an inside look at the judicial confirmation process? Tamara Tabo reviews Judge Southwick’s new memoir.

    12 Comments / / Feb 21, 2014 at 2:41 PM
  • 220px-Marco_Rubio,_Official_Portrait,_112th_Congress-RF

    Judicial Nominations, Politics, Senate Judiciary Committee

    Marco Rubio Single-Handedly Blocks Nomination Of Black, Gay Federal Judge

    Forget the filibuster; there are other ways to block judicial nominees.

    47 Comments / / Jan 8, 2014 at 2:03 PM
  • Reema Bajaj

    Biglaw, Constitutional Law, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Federal Judges, Gay Marriage, Guns / Firearms, Health Care / Medicine, Insurance, John Marshall Law School, John Roberts, Law Schools, Money, Morning Docket, Religion, SCOTUS, Sonia Sotomayor, Supreme Court, Utah, Women's Issues

    Morning Docket: 01.02.14

    * In his year-end report, Chief Justice Roberts politely asked Congress to make it rain on the federal judiciary in fiscal year 2014, because “[t]he future would be bleak” without additional funding. [Reuters]

    * Utah finally asked for Supreme Court intervention in its quest to stop gay couples from marrying, but Justice Sotomayor wants a response from the other side before she weighs in. WWSSD? [BuzzFeed]

    * Perhaps Justice Sotomayor saw the humor in this: she just gave a group of nuns a temporary reprieve from having to give out birth control to a bunch of women who have taken vows of chastity. [Bloomberg]

    * Where in the world is Carmen Sandiego Steven Davis? Oh boy, Dewey have some news for you! The failed firm’s former chairman is now the chief legal representative for Ras al Khaimah in the United Arab Emirates. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * “The Second Amendment does not preclude reasonable regulation.” A judge upheld the majority of New York’s new gun laws as constitutional. Opponents are ready to lock and load on appeal. [New York Times]

    * Just because your law school isn’t ranked, it doesn’t mean you can’t dream big. Case in point: one of this year’s Skadden Fellows will graduate from John Marshall (Chicago) this spring. [National Law Journal]

    * Reema Bajaj, the attorney who pleaded guilty to a prostitution charge, decided that she wasn’t in the mood to ride this Johnson any longer. Like her panties, the case has been dropped. [Daily Chronicle]

    2 Comments / / Jan 2, 2014 at 9:28 AM
  • The federal judiciary thanks you.

    10th Circuit, Barack Obama, Biglaw, Federal Judges, Gay Marriage, George Bush, Law Schools, Morning Docket, State Judges, Texas, Trials, Utah, Violence

    Morning Docket: 12.31.13

    * Barack Obama is trailing George W. Bush when it comes to leaving his mark on the federal courts, but that’s probably because Senate Democrats didn’t go nuclear quickly enough. [Blog of Legal Times]

    * When it comes to 2013, one thing’s for sure: it wasn’t boring. Many of this year’s movers and shakers hailed from top Am Law 100 law firms — like Ted Cruz (formerly of Morgan Lewis). [American Lawyer]

    * John Ray III isn’t going to sit back and allow a jury to shut down his discrimination and retaliation case against Ropes & Gray. He filed a notice of appeal last week, and he’s pissed off. [National Law Journal]

    * Utah has until the end of January to figure out how it’s going to go about defending its same-sex marriage ban before the Tenth Circuit. Just a thought: the “it’s still gay, even if the balls don’t touch” theory of law isn’t going to cut it. [Deseret News]

    * A lawyer for the Texas judge accused of strangling his girlfriend is offering media outlets a superb defense story on behalf of his client. He wasn’t trying to kill her, he was trying to save her! [New York Daily News]

    * Here’s some advice on how to submit your law school application on time. If you don’t know how to meet a deadline, you’re going to make a great lawyer. [Law Admissions Lowdown / U.S. News & World Report]

    0 Comments / / Dec 31, 2013 at 9:03 AM
  • J Harvie Wilkinson III RF

    4th Circuit, Federal Judges, J. Harvie Wilkinson III, Judicial Nominations, Politics, Quote of the Day, Washington Post

    And Was His Honor ‘Stoked’ As Well?

    What does a prominent federal judge think of the end of the filibuster for most presidential nominees?

    2 Comments / / Nov 26, 2013 at 1:27 PM
  • 220px-Richard_G._Kopf_District_Judge-RF

    Books, Federal Judges, Judicial Nominations, Kenji Yoshino, Quote of the Day, Richard Posner

    Underneath Their Robes, Indeed

    Would you “rat out” your daughter to obtain a federal judgeship?

    12 Comments / / Nov 25, 2013 at 2:28 PM
  • old law books

    Anthony Kennedy, Biglaw, Christopher Christie, Federal Government, Federal Judges, Gay Marriage, Law Reviews, Law Schools, Money, Morning Docket, New Jersey, SCOTUS, State Judges, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 10.11.13

    * Justice Anthony Kennedy doesn’t think that law school should be shortened to two years, but he does think that the “cost factor has to be addressed.” Somebody really ought to listen to this man and give his words some credence. [WSJ Law Blog (sub. req.)]

    * Let’s give Lady Justice a big round of applause, because the federal judiciary announced that it’s got enough cash on hand to keep things running until October 17, two whole days more than originally planned. Cherish the small things. [Blog of Legal Times]

    * If Biglaw firms don’t adapt to the changing times, they may soon go the way of the dodo — or, to be a little more relevant to large law firms, they may soon go the way of the Dewey. Scary. [American Lawyer]

    * Gov. Chris Christie’s administration appealed a judge’s denial of a stay on a ruling allowing gay marriages to be performed within the state. Please try to stay Jersey Strong and fabulous through this. [USA Today]

    * Law review? More like flaw review, amirite? Apparently there’s a big problem with law review articles, and it’s not just that they’re incredibly boring and wind up in books that are never read. [National Law Journal]

    4 Comments / / Oct 11, 2013 at 9:08 AM
  • govt closed

    Federal Government, Federal Judges, Money, Quote of the Day

    This Federal Judge Has A Message For Congress: ‘Eff You!’

    Members of the federal judiciary are very pissed off about the shutdown.

    2 Comments / / Oct 8, 2013 at 3:35 PM
  • Dzhokhar Tsarnaev

    Barack Obama, Biglaw, Constitutional Law, Entertainment Law, Federal Judges, General Counsel, Kasowitz Benson, Law Professors, Money, Morning Docket, Prisons, Women's Issues

    Morning Docket: 10.04.13

    * “We’re in uncharted territory right now.” The federal courts made it through the first week of the shutdown, but they’re approaching “here be dragons” land in terms of funding. [National Law Journal]

    * “It would be the most interesting case in decades.” Legal experts (read: law professors from T14s) debate whether President Obama can ignore the debt ceiling for much longer. [New York Times]

    * People are getting out of Biglaw while the getting’s good. Reed Smith’s global managing partner is leaving the firm for a general counsel gig after 13 years at the helm. [WSJ Law Blog (sub. req.)]

    * Law firm leaders met to discuss how to empower women attorneys, and agreed it’s wise to parade them around in front of clients. Getting to work on those clients’ cases is another question. [Blog of Legal Times]

    * No debacles here, contrary to past precedent: Kasowitz Benson poached two superior legal minds from NBCUniversal and welcomed them to the firm to open an entertainment litigation practice. [Bloomberg]

    * Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s lawyers want their client’s prison restrictions to be lifted and are raising a slew of constitutional claims. We think the members of his fan club are the only ones feeling sorry for him. [CNN]

    3 Comments / / Oct 4, 2013 at 9:13 AM
  • Jill Kelley

    Antonin Scalia, Biglaw, Department of Justice, Federal Government, Federal Judges, Law School Deans, Law Schools, Money, Morning Docket, Politics, Privacy, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, White-Collar Crime

    Morning Docket: 09.26.13

    * With a government shutdown looming, the Supreme Court will likely go about business as usual. In fact, Justice Alito is rolling his eyes at the mere concept of closing the Court’s doors as we speak. [SCOTUSblog]

    * But in the meantime, both the Department of Justice and the federal judiciary are hunkering down and waiting for the collapse of law and order thanks to all of our petulant politicians in Washington, D.C. [Blog of Legal Times]

    * Justice Scalia thinks the NSA’s surveillance programs may come before SCOTUS for an examination of a “right of privacy that comes from penumbras and emanations, blah blah blah, garbage.” [Associated Press]

    * Perhaps it’s due to the “hangover from the collapse of the markets in 2008,” but white-collar defense practices are on the rise in Biglaw, and the firms’ leaders could not be happier. [Philadelphia Inquirer]

    * Another law school ranking just means there’s another way for Yale to whoop Harvard’s ass. Now we know that Lat’s alma mater is slightly better at producing law deans than Elie’s. [National Law Journal]

    * A motion to dismiss has been filed, and now Jill Kelley, the Florida socialite who assisted in bringing about the end of General David Petraeus’s career in the CIA, is watching her legal case unravel. [CNN]

    2 Comments / / Sep 26, 2013 at 9:10 AM
  • US Supreme Court

    Federal Judges, Media and Journalism, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    People Who Have Actually Heard of the Supreme Court Don’t Like It Very Much

    Apparently there are people in this country who didn’t even know we had a Supreme Court. Yikes!

    9 Comments / / Mar 26, 2013 at 1:03 PM
  • gavel judge Above the Law blog

    Brett Kavanaugh, Clerkships, D.C. Circuit, Federal Government, Federal Judges, Feeder Judges, Job Searches, Law Schools, Merrick Garland

    The Law Clerk Hiring Plan: Really, Really Dead Now

    Can the Law Clerk Hiring Plan survive, now that one super-prestigious court has announced that it’s abandoning ship?

    6 Comments / / Jan 30, 2013 at 12:38 PM