Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA)

  • Richard Posner small

    7th Circuit, Federal Judges, Richard Posner, War on Terror

    Someone Really Wants To Shut Up Judge Posner

    Opinions get redacted or sealed all the time, but the latest from the Seventh Circuit is a doozy….

    12 Comments / / Jul 30, 2014 at 1:26 PM
  • spy glass RF

    Cellphones, Constitutional Law, Politics, Privacy, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Technology

    NSA Surveillance In 2013: The Year Of Vindicated Political Paranoia

    What is the real tragedy of 2013’s mass surveillance revelations? Some thoughts from conservative columnist Tamara Tabo.

    17 Comments / / Jan 3, 2014 at 3:02 PM
  • Louboutin

    Attorney Misconduct, Biglaw, Billable Hours, Crime, Fashion, Federal Judges, Law Schools, Legal Ethics, Morning Docket, Murder, Patton Boggs, Politics, Religion, Shoes, Texas, Trademarks

    Morning Docket: 10.16.13

    * Stop bullying the judges on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court. They don’t cave to just any government data request — they make changes to about 25 percent of them. But uh… they don’t like to talk about the other 75 percent. [Bloomberg] * Everything’s bigger in Texas, including the number of Biglaw firms with […]

    7 Comments / / Oct 16, 2013 at 8:42 AM
  • Shon Hopwood

    Bankruptcy, Biglaw, Clerkships, D.C. Circuit, Divorce Train Wrecks, Federal Judges, Howrey LLP, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Sentencing Law, Technology

    Morning Docket: 09.06.13

    * Thanks to the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the Department of Justice will be declassifying some secret opinions from the FISA Court. We wonder who’ll be hosting the giant redaction party. [Associated Press]

    * Morgan Lewis paid out a $1.15 million settlement over unfinished business claims to this defunct firm. Great work, Mr. Diamond, but Howrey going to get the rest to do the same? [Am Law Daily (sub. req.)]

    * “[Shon] Hopwood proves that my sentencing instincts suck.” Now that this former bank robber has a clerkship with the D.C. Circuit, the judge who sentenced him is having second thoughts. [The Two-Way / NPR]

    * Laptops are useful tools for students in law school classrooms, but they’re also great for checking Above the Law and buying shoes while professors are droning on and on. Apparently we needed a study to confirm this. [National Law Journal (sub. req.)]

    * George Zimmerman’s wife filed for divorce, citing “disappointment” as one of her reasons for ending the marriage. Don’t worry, Shellie, half of the nation was disappointed with the verdict too. [Washington Post]

    3 Comments / / Sep 6, 2013 at 9:09 AM
  • 210px-Words_With_Friends_Logo

    Bar Exams, Basketball, Craigslist, iPhone, Movies, Non-Sequiturs, Technology, Trademarks, Video games

    Non-Sequiturs: 08.01.13

    * Zynga is suing the makers of Bang With Friends alleging that the latter chose its name to take advantage of market confusion with Words With Friends. To remedy the suit, the app is considering a name change to “Bangville” which actually works better because Bang With Friends is all about pathetically bothering everyone on Facebook to give you something you can’t go out and get yourself. [BBC]

    * Ariel Castro gave some testimony. It was crazy. Enjoy! [Jezebel]

    * A comprehensive legal analysis of Better Off Dead. Spoiler alert: the Paperboy was a penal code violating machine. [The Legal Geeks]

    * 10 Things Only Someone Who’s Taken the Bar Exam Would Know [Policy Mic]

    * Just where is the FISA Court? 10 points to Gryffindor for the “Room of Requirement” reference. [Konklone]

    * The NBA luxury tax is supposed to help parity. So why doesn’t it? [The Legal Blitz]

    * Brutally honest Craigslist ad for temp document review work. This will probably come down at some point, so the ad is reproduced after the jump…

    7 Comments / / Aug 1, 2013 at 4:05 PM
  • Judge_Robertson-RF

    Privacy

    Former FISC Judge Quit Over Warrantless Wiretapping, Now Argues FISC Is Out Of Control

    Not every former FISA judge is singing the praises of the system.

    11 Comments / / Jul 12, 2013 at 2:02 PM
  • Apple-Computer-Apple-Computers-Inc

    Akin Gump, Antitrust, Crime, D.C. Circuit, Intellectual Property, Murder, Non-Sequiturs, Patents, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Technology, Vault rankings

    Non-Sequiturs: 07.10.13

    * Apple has lost the e-books trial. Didn’t see that coming after Apple’s lawyers ripped the government’s witnesses. [New York Times]

    * Vault released its Regional and Practice Area rankings. Yeah, we get it Wachtell, you’re awesome. [Vault]

    * Who ever said losing at the Supreme Court was the end? Myriad is suing to enforce its patents in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. [Patently O]

    * Woman caught on camera planning her husband’s murder because it’s “easier than divorcing him.” Fair enough! [Lowering the Bar]

    * Senators pledging to block court nominee “irrespective of [her] very fine professional qualifications.” Oh. [The Blog of the Legal Times]

    * Some jurisdictional nerdiness regarding EPIC’s original filing seeking mandamus, prohibition, or certiorari from SCOTUS to review a FISA judge. [Lawfare]

    2 Comments / / Jul 10, 2013 at 5:32 PM
  • 220px-Zimmerman,_George_-_Seminole_County_Mug-RF

    Constitutional Law, Guns / Firearms, Privacy, Technology

    3 Notable Legal Stories From The Short Week

    Looking back at three interesting legal stories from the short holiday week.

    27 Comments / / Jul 5, 2013 at 5:39 PM
  • marriage equality

    9th Circuit, Antonin Scalia, Ballard Spahr, Biglaw, California, Election Law, Elena Kagan, Gay, Gay Marriage, John Roberts, Law Firm Mergers, Minority Issues, Morning Docket, Patton Boggs, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 07.01.13

    * Who is the real John Roberts? Will he forever be known as health care reform’s savior, or the man who disregarded precedent to gut minority voting rights? Hell if we know, so we’ll let you be the judge. [Opinionator / New York Times]

    * The man may be a mystery, but one thing’s for sure when it comes to Chief Justice Roberts: it’s fair to say that at this point, he’d sincerely appreciate it if his colleagues would kindly STFU during oral argument. [Big Story / Associated Press]

    * Elena Kagan, a justice who was never a judge, is now being praised for her ability to put the law into terms that non-lawyers can understand. That’s a score for law professors everywhere. [New York Times]

    * In terms of the Voting Rights Act, while the chances of the current Congress enacting a universal voting law are approximately nil, there are other effective avenues that could be taken. [New York Times]

    * On Friday, the Ninth Circuit lifted the stay on gay marriages in California, and less than 24 hours later, Prop 8 supporters filed an emergency motion with SCOTUS to stop all of the weddings. Lovely. [NPR]

    * Meanwhile, ex-judge Vaughn Walker thinks Justice Scalia’s having joined the high court’s majority on standing telegraphed the fact that he didn’t have votes to uphold Prop 8 as constitutional. [NPR]

    * Rubber stamp this: Judges on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court are so upset that they’re being made out as government patsies that they’re talking to the press about it. [Washington Post]

    * Whether you think Chevron is “suing [Patton Boggs] lawyers for litigating” or for promoting fraud that “shocks the conscience,” here’s a summary of what’s going on in an epic case. [Washington Post]

    * Got a high-profile criminal defense firm? Look out, because you may have captured Biglaw’s eye. Take, for example, Stillman & Friedman, which will be merging with Ballard Spahr. [New York Times]

    * Apparently being in your mid-50s is a “good time to [retire]” for law deans who pull in six figures. Ken Randall, outgoing dean of Alabama Law, says he’s “really ready for the next challenge.” [AL.com]

    9 Comments / / Jul 1, 2013 at 9:08 AM
  • Lauren Giddings

    Biglaw, Books, Clarence Thomas, Deaths, Google / Search Engines, Immigration, Labor / Employment, Morning Docket, Murder, Partner Issues, Partner Profits, Pro Bono, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 06.19.13

    * You think you know Justice Clarence Thomas, but you have no idea. Here are several myths about the silent Supreme Court star that he was capable of busting in just this term alone. [WSJ Law Blog (sub. req.)]

    * According to the CBO, the immigration reform bill being considered in the Senate would allow eight million immigrants to gain legal status and lower the deficit by billions. But alas, dey still terk er jerbs! [NPR]

    * Google is doing its best to try not to be evil by asking the FISA court to ease up on gag orders preventing the internet giant from telling the world about what it’s required to give to the government. [Washington Post]

    * Florida firm Becker & Poliakoff will withhold 20% of equity partners’ pay, a move that made some lawyers cry. The firm is apparently planning to save the cash for a rainy day. [Daily Business Review]

    * Paul Mannina, an attorney with the Labor Department charged with sexually assaulting a coworker, was found in his cell with his throat slashed. Police are investigating the death. [Washington Post]

    * FYI, your aspirational pro bono hours — or complete and utter lack thereof — will now be public record in New York, and you must report them on your biannual registration forms. [New York Law Journal]

    * Coming soon to a law school near you: really old books from the 13th century that’ll probably turn into dust if you dare try to read them. You can find this nerdgasm over at Yale Law. [National Law Journal]

    * The family of Lauren Giddings, the slain Mercer Law graduate, has filed a $5 million wrongful death suit in federal court against accused killer Stephen McDaniel in the hopes of finding her remains. [Telegraph]

    5 Comments / / Jun 19, 2013 at 9:07 AM
  • ACS RF

    American Constitution Society (ACS), Judicial Nominations, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    ACS 2013: Liberals Aren’t Very Optimistic

    Progressive lawyers try to find silver linings in a judicial landscape that keeps kicking their interests in the gut.

    13 Comments / / Jun 14, 2013 at 12:24 PM
  • spying

    Constitutional Law, Federal Government, Politics, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    The Hidden Blessings of the NSA’s Spying

    There’s a silver lining to the NSA spying cloud, as columnist Tamara Tabo explains.

    21 Comments / / Jun 13, 2013 at 11:27 AM

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