FTC

  • Gavel

    Federal Government

    Georgia Law Paves Way For Private FTC Rule Violation Suits

    In a surprising decision from a usually franchise-friendly jurisdiction, the Georgia Court of Appeals recently held that a Georgia statute provides a method for franchisees to bring private lawsuits for violations of the FTC Rule.

    / Mar 3, 2015 at 4:18 PM
  • internet address

    Federal Government, Technology

    The Internet of Things: What All Companies Need To Know About the FTC Report

    The FTC released its Report on the Internet of Things (“IoT”) on January 27, 2015 (“Report”). While the Report is specific to IoT, including devices such as wearable fitness trackers and internet connected cameras and televisions, there are key takeaways for all companies operating online[1].

    / Feb 12, 2015 at 1:59 PM
  • typing

    Technology

    FTC Staff Report on Internet of Things: Recommends Self-Regulation “Best Practices,” But Leaves Key Issues Unresolved

    The Federal Trade Commission released its much anticipated staff report on January 27 regarding consumer privacy and data security concerns arising from the emerging market for connected devices known as the Internet of Things (“IoT”).

    / Feb 6, 2015 at 4:47 PM
  • Supreme_Court_US_2010

    Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 01.12.15

    * The case for rotating Chief Justices. Because the Supreme Court should operate more like your PTA. [PrawfsBlawg]

    * Finally a solution to police misconduct that might actually work. But it doesn’t result in a boondoggle to camera manufacturing defense contractors, so there’s no way this will end up happening. [Redline]

    * Last month we put out an APB for Bobby Chen, Supreme Court litigant. Well, no luck. The Supreme Court dropped his case. [Lowering the Bar]

    * Boies Schiller announces the hiring of Matthew Schwartz and John Zach to launch a new Global Investigations and White Collar Defense practice area. Read up on their exploits at the U.S. Attorney’s Office with this detailed account of the prosecution of the Madoff Five. [Forbes]

    * Mark Hermann explained the importance of trust in his article today. Here are 5 tips for building that reputation. [Law and More]

    * Who regulated qualified health claims? It might just be “no one.” [Inside Counsel]

    * The contestants on @Midnight last week tackled the curious case of Michael A. Fiumara and his sex doll interview advertisement. They start dealing with Fiumara at the 23:44. [Comedy Central]

    7 Comments / / Jan 12, 2015 at 5:00 PM
  • Gavel with American Flag

    Technology

    Numerous Warning Letters Serve as a Reminder that the FTC is Always Watching

    The Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) has been very active in its enforcement efforts in the past couple of months. In addition to other actions which we have blogged about, the FTC recently sent dozens of warning letters to advertisers in two separate efforts.

    / Nov 18, 2014 at 11:24 AM
  • Gavel

    Federal Government

    FTC Brings First Actions Under the Restore Online Shoppers’ Confidence Act

    Last month, the Federal Trade Commission brought a pair of actions under the Restore Online Shoppers’ Confidence Act (“ROSCA”) – the first of their kind.

    / Nov 11, 2014 at 11:23 AM
  • at&t logo

    Technology

    FTC Claims that AT&T Failed to Deliver on ‘Unlimited’ Data Promises

    Yesterday, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) filed a complaint in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California against AT&T Mobility, LLC (“AT&T”) over claims that AT&T violated Section 5 of the FTC Act by engaging in unfair and deceptive practices relating to the company’s “unlimited” data plans. The FTC asserts that AT&T has misled millions of its customers by marketing and selling “unlimited” data plans, while reducing data speeds for certain unlimited plan customers by up to 90 percent through a practice known as “throttling.”

    / Nov 4, 2014 at 10:08 AM
  • Internet Bully

    Technology

    Top 10 Technology Blunders for Employers

    As one who presumably has no nude selfies, you may not be too concerned about a “hack” like the one that continues to afflict celebrities like Jennifer Lawrence and Kate Upton. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t still plenty of technology issues that an employer should look out for. Are you guilty of any of these top ten technology blunders that are either committed or allowed by employers?

    Blunder No. 1: Recruiting or hiring employees using “coherent people profiles” assembled by aggregators like Spokeo.

    / Nov 3, 2014 at 3:12 PM
  • cell phone

    Privacy, Technology

    Recent International Study Reports Delinquencies in App Privacy Disclosures

    Ed note: This post originally appeared on InfoLawGroup. In a recently reported study released by the the Global Privacy Enforcement Network (“GPEN”), the GPEN found that a testing sample of 1,211 mobile apps accessed during May of this year failed to provide users with adequate privacy protections under current regulatory provisions in the United States […]

    / Sep 25, 2014 at 11:28 AM
  • money in the hands

    Biglaw, FTC

    The Legal Trick Payday Lenders Are Using To Skirt The Law

    It’s hard to believe a company can so blatantly thumb its nose at the rules, but they have a secret and some Biglaw bigshots on retainer to fight tooth-and-nail to protect their lending practices….

    36 Comments / / Sep 12, 2014 at 2:17 PM
  • 640px-Bob_McDonnell_by_Gage_Skidmore

    Drinking, FTC, Health Care / Medicine, Non-Sequiturs, Police, Politics, Racism, Trademarks

    Non-Sequiturs: 09.04.14

    * Bob McDonnell, former governor of Virginia, guilty of 11 counts of corruption. Maureen McDonnell guilty of 8. If only they’d gotten that severance motion. [Wonkette] * The best way to catch drunk drivers is to give them something to crash into. [Legal Juice] * Chaumtoli Huq, a former general counsel to the New York […]

    1 Comment / / Sep 4, 2014 at 5:37 PM
  • Gavel with American Flag

    Federal Government

    Wearable Device Privacy – A Legislative Priority?

    Ed note: This post originally appeared on Global Regulatory Enforcement Law Blog. Seemingly every day, new types of wearable devices are popping up on the market. Google Glass, Samsung’s Gear, Fitbit (a fitness and activity tracker), Pulse (a fitness tracker that measures heart rate and blood oxygen), and Narrative (a wearable, automatic camera) are just […]

    / Aug 18, 2014 at 12:23 PM
  • 220px-NYSCourtofAppeals1

    Bankruptcy, Biglaw, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Election Law, FTC, Legal Ethics, Morning Docket, Sexual Harassment, White-Collar Crime

    Morning Docket: 07.02.14

    * The New York Court of Appeals put the hurt on defunct firms seeking unfinished business fees from former partners who left for greener pastures. Sorry, I didn’t follow ATL protocol: “Dewey think firms should collect unfinished business fees?” [Wall Street Journal Law Blog]

    * We reported on the Tinder lawsuit yesterday. Here’s a collection of all the messed up texts involved. [Valleywag]

    * Facebook’s lawyer is now calling the emotional manipulation study it recently conducted “customer service.” Dear Internet: Despite all your rage, you’re still just rats in a cage. [The Atlantic]

    * So if you’re studying for the MPRE, blow jobs aren’t the preferred legal fee. [Legal Profession Blog]

    * How did your last cell phone bill look? Because the FTC says T-Mobile knowingly added hundreds of millions of charges on. At least that girl in pink was cute, huh? [USA Today]

    * BNP Paribas is confident it can pay its record fine. [Dealbook / New York Times]

    * Meanwhile, Putin accused the U.S. of trying to use the BNP fine to blackmail France into turning its back on Russia. Because conspiracy theories are awesome. [Bloomberg]

    * Lawsuit filed because right-wingers totally miffed that black people voted for a Republican. [Sun Herald (Mississippi)]

    / Jul 2, 2014 at 9:06 AM
  • 1024px-Microchips

    American Bar Association / ABA, FDA, Food, FTC, Immigration, Non-Sequiturs, Supreme Court

    Non-Sequiturs: 06.16.14

    * Lawyer explains to court how people illegally implanted a silicon chip in her head. No word on her feelings about Mondays. [Tampa Bay Times]

    * How much juice content did Coca-Cola think allowed them to market a product as juice? The answer will actually surprise you unless you really, really hate Coke. [PR Log]

    * Defendants should not have access to the Internet because they could beat someone to death with an iPad. I guess. [Lowering the Bar]

    * Mobile crammers settle for $10 million. The charge will appear on their next month’s phone bill. [Law and More]

    * Like most things in life, the path to victory involves beginning from the KISS principle. [Katz Justice]

    * Of all the over-the-top immigration control efforts in this country, arresting a couple in bed for not being “married enough” is one of the craziest. [Sun Sentinel]

    * The American Bar Association, fresh off loosening its accreditation standards, is actually trying to dupe kids into thinking this is the best time to attend law school. Check out this ad. And if you want to play with it in Photoshop, that would be cool too…

    1 Comment / / Jun 16, 2014 at 4:46 PM
  • Data RF

    Federal Government

    Data Brokers Know Far More About Consumers Than Consumers About Them, Says FTC

    Anna Gallegos adds a bit of context to the FTC’s report on data brokers.

    0 Comments / / Jun 3, 2014 at 3:01 PM
  • silhouette man full length secret agent in a james bond posture

    Antonin Scalia, Defamation, Environment / Environmental Law, FTC, Law Professors, Law Schools, Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 05.30.14

    * Confessions of a litigious mind: Trial attorney admits he was trained as a spy. [What About Clients?]

    * A Fordham Law professor running for governor. [New York Times]

    * Are messenger bags unprofessional for lawyers? My firm bought us messenger bags with firm logos so this wasn’t a question for me. [Corporette]

    * New carbon regulations on the horizon and industry is already gearing up for a fight. [Breaking Energy]

    * FTC charging Jerk.com with deceiving customers. What a paradox, because if the FTC is right this seems like truth in advertising. [IT-Lex]

    * Larry Klayman is suing the entity he founded, Judicial Watch, for defamation. Somehow Orly Taitz is involved. [South Florida Lawyers]

    * Hey recent grads! Do you need to frame your shiny new diploma? Mountary is offering a 20 percent discount to ATL readers. Just enter the code “atl20″ at checkout. [Mountary]

    * Bruce Allen Murphy has a new biography on Justice Antonin Scalia that proposes that far from forging a conservative Court, Justice Scalia’s actions have undermined building a conservative team of justices. Also he reminds us that Scalia was totally an affirmative action hire. Video after the jump…. [YouTube]

    3 Comments / / May 30, 2014 at 5:01 PM
  • Scene_at_the_Signing_of_the_Constitution_of_the_United_States

    Hearsay, International Law, Non-Sequiturs, Patents, SCOTUS, State Judges, State Judges Are Clowns, Supreme Court

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.02.13

    * This Term, both wings of the Court will be making originalist arguments because “slaveholders from 200 years ago said so” is the most compelling argument in our legal toolbox. [Constitutional Accountability Center]

    * Yale Law grad Ronan Farrow, supposedly Woody Allen’s son, might really be Frank Sinatra’s son. Looking at him that… makes sense. [Vanity Fair]

    * Looks like the FTC is finally going after patent trolls. Or would be if we still had a government. [Ars Technica]

    * Based on the look and address, the Law Librarians blog appears to have left the Law Professor Blogs Network. It must have been too loud in there for the librarians. [Law Librarians]

    * So… you’re saying lots of trial judges out there don’t understand hearsay? [The Legal Watchdog]

    * Avast! Russia is going after Greenpeace (probably illegally) for piracy. [The Volokh Conspiracy]

    * A reminder that the federal government shut down is the result of state laws, so maybe you should vote in those off-year local elections. [PrawfsBlawg]

    7 Comments / / Oct 2, 2013 at 5:02 PM
  • Davis Polk Wardwell RF

    Biglaw, Federal Government, Lateral Moves, Musical Chairs, Partner Issues

    Musical Chairs: Notable New Names at Davis Polk, Paul Hastings, and Orrick

    Davis Polk lands a big-name lateral with major government experience, while Paul Hastings and Orrick raid rivals for talent.

    4 Comments / / Jun 18, 2013 at 2:03 PM