JetBlue

  • asia globe

    Airplanes / Aviation, American Bar Association / ABA, Antitrust, Arnold & Porter, Biglaw, Confirmations, Crime, Deaths, Department of Justice, Hate Crimes, John Roberts, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Murder, Patents, SCOTUS, Student Loans, Supreme Court, Travel / Vacation, Trendspotting, Violence

    Morning Docket: 01.02.13

    * While Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts made a plea to keep funding for the federal judiciary intact, we learned that student loan default cases have fallen since 2011. You really gotta love that income-based repayment. [WSJ Law Blog (sub. req.)]

    * Introducing the Asia 50, a list of the largest firms in the Asia-Pacific region. When it comes to the firms with the biggest footprints, only one American Biglaw shop made the cut. Go ahead and take a wild guess on which one it was. [Asian Lawyer]

    * Congratulations are in order, because after almost a year of stalling, Arnold & Porter partner William Baer was finally confirmed by the Senate as the chief of the Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division. [Bloomberg]

    * Our elected officials might not have allowed the country to fall off the fiscal cliff, but the American Invents Act was put on hold, so if you’re a patent nerd, you can still be mad about something. [National Law Journal]

    * Remember when Rutgers-Camden Law said “many top students” were making bank after graduation? Yeah, about that: Law School Transparency just filed an ABA complaint. [Thomson Reuters News & Insight]

    * Here are some law school trends to look out for in 2013. FYI, the applicant pool is smaller because no one wants to foolishly gamble on their careers anymore. [Law Admissions Lowdown / U.S. News & World Report]

    * In the latest NYC subway shoving death, a woman was charged with second-degree murder as a hate crime, and allegedly bragged about other hate crimes she’s committed to police. Lovely. [New York Times]

    * Next time you’re trapped on a plane that’s literally filled with other people’s crap for 11 hours, don’t bother suing over your hellish experience — you’re going to be preempted by federal law. [New York Law Journal]

    1 Comment / / Jan 2, 2013 at 9:10 AM
  • fireworks

    Airplanes / Aviation, California, Constitutional Law, Copyright, Department of Justice, Federal Government, Federal Judges, Food, Gay Marriage, Intellectual Property, John Roberts, Law Schools, Morning Docket, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, UNC Law

    Morning Docket: 07.04.12

    Ed. note: Your Above the Law editors are busy celebrating their freedom today (and we hope that you are, too). We will return to our regular publication schedule on Thursday, July 5.

    * At this point, the Supreme Court’s dramatic deliberations on the Affordable Care Act are like a leaking sieve. Now we’ve got dueling narratives on Chief Justice Roberts’s behind-the-scenes flip-flopping. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Life, liberty, and the pursuit of fabulosity! The Department of Justice has asked the Supreme Court to grant cert on two DOMA cases, contending that Section 3 of the statute is unconstitutional. [Poliglot / Metro Weekly]

    * A famous fabulist: according to California’s State Bar, disgraced journalist Stephen Glass is a “pervasive and documented liar,” but that’s not stopping him from trying to get his license to practice law. [Los Angeles Times]

    * Clayton Osbon, the JetBlue pilot who had an epic mid-flight nutty and started ranting about religion and terrorists, was found not guilty by reason of insanity by a federal judge during a bench trial. [New York Post]

    * After a month of bizarre legal filings, Charles Carreon has dropped his lawsuit against Matthew Inman of The Oatmeal. We’re hoping that there will be an awesome victory cartoon drawn up soon. [Digital Life / Today]

    * Northwestern Law is the only American law school to have joined a 17-member global justice league geared toward legal teaching and research collaborations. But do they get cool costumes? [National Law Journal]

    * UNC Law received two charitable gifts totaling $2.7M that will be used to fund tuition scholarships for current and future students. Maybe their students won’t have to create tuition donation sites anymore. [Herald-Sun]

    * This law is for the birds (literally and figuratively). California’s ban on the sale of foie gras had only been in effect for one day before the first lawsuit was filed to overturn it as unconstitutional. [San Francisco Chronicle]

    * The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of the Department of Commerce recently announced that mermaids do not exist. Not to worry — it’s still legal to believe that Ariel is a babe. [New York Daily News]

    6 Comments / / Jul 4, 2012 at 9:15 AM
  • bobby_rush_hoodie

    Airplanes / Aviation, Bankruptcy, Baseball, Biglaw, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Fashion, Federal Government, Health Care / Medicine, Morning Docket, Trademarks

    Morning Docket: 03.29.12

    * If Obamacare gets struck down, do you think insurance companies will allow children to remain on their parents’ plans until age 26? My Magic 8-Ball says: “Outlook not so good.” [Wall Street Journal] * There’s no crying in baseball bankruptcy sales! Which Biglaw firms hit a home run for playing a part in the […]

    18 Comments / / Mar 29, 2012 at 9:17 AM
  • Airplanes / Aviation, Constitutional Law, Federal Judges, Privacy, Travel / Vacation

    Two Minutes of Terrorist Triumph: Alone With the TSA

    Elie Mystal’s objections to the TSA and the invasive search techniques they employ have been well documented on Above the Law. He believes their tactics are violative of our rights and would be deemed unconstitutional in any America where courts placed justice ahead of fear. He believes citizens who support these procedures do not deserve the liberty they so eagerly toss aside. And he believed all of that before he was actually molested by the TSA just last week….

    186 Comments / / Sep 9, 2011 at 10:13 AM
  • Airplanes / Aviation, Lawsuit of the Day, Privacy, Travel / Vacation

    Lawsuit of the Day: Asking For Proof Of Panties Is One Way To Put Them in a Bunch

    Did JetBlue go too far in its passenger screening procedures? One New York woman alleges that a JetBlue employee demanded not just proof of identification, but proof of… panties.

    40 Comments / / Jul 22, 2011 at 3:47 PM
  • Airplanes / Aviation, Crime, Gay

    JetBlue Flight Attendant Steven Slater Pleads Guilty

    In a reader poll we took back in August, 80 percent of you expressed the view that JetBlue flight attendant Steven Slater, famous for his on-board meltdown and dramatic exit, is not a criminal (or shouldn’t be treated as one). Well, now he is. This morning Steve Slater pled guilty to second-degree attempted criminal mischief, […]

    20 Comments / / Oct 19, 2010 at 12:10 PM
  • Airplanes / Aviation, Constitutional Law, Crime, Elizabeth Wurtzel, Gay

    Did the JetBlue Flight Attendant Go Down the Slippery Slope Slide to Criminality?

    We touched upon this issue in Morning Docket, both today and yesterday: Is Steven Slater — the JetBlue flight attendant who reportedly unleashed a profanity-laced tirade over the airplane’s public-address system, before fleeing the plane via the emergency-evacuation chute, beer in hand — a criminal? Slater was hit with felony charges of criminal mischief and […]

    69 Comments / / Aug 11, 2010 at 1:55 PM

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