Reed Smith

Dana Delany

* Do you need to teach your wife a lesson? Allegedly, there’s an app for that. [Fox News]

* K&L Gates provides a soft landing place for David DeNinno, the former Reed Smith partner who was called out in JoEllen Lyons Dillon’s sex discrimination lawsuit. [Pittsburgh Post-Gazette]

* Delaware Chancellor William Chandler has decided to cash his chips in with Wilson Sonsini. [WSJ Law Blog]

* Can’t a girl date a drug dealer and prosecute the men accused of trying to kill him without everybody getting all worked up about it? [Philadelphia Inquiry]

David DeNinno

* Can the Canadian government tax poker winnings? Then why can’t Canadian poker players write off poker losses as tax deductions? [Canadian Lawyer Mag]

* Sounds like the D.C. Medical Examiner’s Office needs Bones, or Dana Delany or something. [Underdog]

* Hey, Republicans, can you actually come up with a presidential candidate who was actually against Obamacare before a Democrat got it passed? It’ll make your protestations against the law seem less intellectually dishonest. [Huffington Post]

JoEllen Lyons Dillon

Back in December, we covered a gender discrimination lawsuit filed by JoEllen Lyons Dillon, a comely corporate partner at Reed Smith, against the firm (where she still worked at the time). Dillon’s allegations were salacious. She claimed, for example, that “work was diverted … to female attorneys who were willing to engage in sexual relations with members of management” — and that her refusal to engage in such relations hurt her at Reed Smith.

Dillon’s case was filed by Samuel J. Cordes, a prominent Pittsburgh employment lawyer. Despite his somewhat cheesy law firm motto, Cordes is well-regarded and seen as “only tak[ing] good cases,” according to one ATL tipster. Cordes promised that his client would, over the course of the litigation, produce specific examples of sexual quid pro quos at Reed Smith. Delicious!

Alas, today brings word that JoEllen Dillon has dropped her case. What happened?

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Ex-Reed Smith Partner Drops Sex Discrimination Suit Against the Firm”

* Elie here: Remember yesterday when I said that it was a prick move by the cop to issue that ticket on the mother of that comatose 13-year-old girl, and then all those commenters said the cops had no choice because issuing the ticket was an important matter in terms of the civil liability of the driver? Yeah, well, I stand by my initial analysis that the cop was a jerkhat. [New York Personal Injury Law Blog]

* We were unimpressed by Holland & Knight giving iPads to its associates — and we’re not alone. [South Florida Lawyers]

* The merger talks between Reed Smith and Thompson & Knight are apparently off (assuming this isn’t another case of Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton). [Am Law Daily]

* How can lawyers dress to impress in 2011? [Lawyerist]

* So let me get this straight, it’s not okay for me to drink Four Loko and drive, but it’s okay for my car to do it? What’s up with that? [Alt Transport]

* Were passports biased against gays? Well, now they won’t be. [Huffington Post]

* If you’ve been following along with the most important news of today — which is obviously that the study showing that a crying woman is a total buzzkill — here’s an important counterpoint. Crying might be nature’s way of saying: “Stop beating on your wife you freaking a**hole. [Newsweek]


JoEllen Lyons Dillon

Pennsylvania legal circles are buzzing over a discrimination lawsuit filed yesterday in federal district court by a partner in the Pittsburgh office of Reed Smith. One source who informed us of the suit referred to “some really interesting allegations” against the firm.

A corporate and energy law partner at Reed Smith, JoEllen Lyons Dillon, alleges that her firm pays and promotes women less than men. Yawn; that’s definitely not “really interesting.” While unfortunate — or even outrage-inducing — if true, one could say the same thing about dozens, if not hundreds, of large law firms.

Far more interesting is Dillon’s claim that “work was diverted … to female attorneys who were willing to engage in sexual relations with members of [Reed Smith] management or with whom members of [Reed Smith] management had sought to engage in such relations.” Dillon alleges that because she “did not engage in such relations,” she was professionally penalized.

David DeNinno

Dillon decided instead to have “relations” with her husband, resulting in the birth of twins. After she took time off to take care of the two tots, “her total compensation decreased, by almost half,” according to the complaint. Dillon claims that when she objected to this pay cut, partner David DeNinno, former chair of the Business & Finance Department at RS, asked if she was “done having babies yet.”

That’s just for starters. Dillon claims to have more dirt on her firm….

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Discrimination Lawsuit Potpourri: Reed Smith and Akin Gump”

Earlier this week, I had the chance to sit down with David Tanenholz, one of the co-founders and partners at Hardinger & Tanenholz LLP (H&T), which is one of the few firms — if not the first — to promote itself solely as “discovery counsel.” And with their experience as Biglaw alumni, the two founders may represent a glimpse into the future of how lawyers can carve out a niche by fusing technology and project management.

So what is it that puts them ahead of the curve? Let’s find out….

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Could Hardinger & Tanenholz Represent the Future of E-Discovery in Biglaw?”

* Orrick and Akin aren’t the only two who are talking. The firms of Reed Smith and Thompson & Knight are also in merger discussions. [Am Law Daily]

* A “cite-checking battle” actually sounds… kinda fun. [Laws for Attorneys]

* There’s a motion for leave to amend the complaint in the Robert Wone civil case. [Who Murdered Robert Wone?]

* Why your job is making you depressed. Maybe because it sucks? [CNN]

* Women of Biglaw: think you have it bad? Your sisters on Wall Street may be even worse off. [The Careerist]

* Speaking of women in the legal profession, nominations are now being accepted for InsideCounsel’s Transformative Leadership Awards, which “honor women general counsel and law firm partners who have demonstrated a commitment to advancing the empowerment of women in corporate law.” [SuperConference]

With fall recruiting gearing up, and the lateral market warming up, we continue our annual series of open threads about the law firms featured in the Vault prestige rankings. These threads provide ATL readers with a forum to discuss the different firms and their various strengths and weaknesses.

The end of the Vault 100 is in sight. We’re covering the firms in batches of 20 now. Here are the firms ranked #61 to #80, which will provide today’s discussion fodder:

61. Greenberg Traurig, LLP
62. Holland & Knight LLP
63. Fish & Richardson P.C.
64. Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP
65. Cahill Gordon & Reindel LLP
66. Foley & Lardner LLP
67. Perkins Coie LLP
68. Nixon Peabody LLP
69. Patton Boggs LLP
70. Kaye Scholer LLP
71. Hunton & Williams LLP
72. Reed Smith LLP
73. Steptoe & Johnson LLP
74. Chadbourne & Parke LLP
75. Howrey LLP
76. Bryan Cave LLP
77. Lovells (US) [now part of Hogan Lovells]
78. Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP
79. Crowell & Moring LLP
80. Schulte Roth & Zabel LLP

This is a very eclectic group, including a few New York-centric firms, some D.C.-dominated places, and a bunch of national and even international giants.

Let’s take a closer look at some of these shops….

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Fall Recruiting Open Threads: Vault 61 – 80 (2011)”

Orly Taitz, Queen of the Birthers

* Former House majority leader Tom DeLay (R-TX) celebrates the Justice Department’s decision to drop its six-year investigation of his dealings with ex-lobbyist Jack Abramoff. [Washington Post]

* Speaking of money and politics, state judicial elections are being flooded with cash. [How Appealing]

* Two Stanford Law students strike a blow against California’s three-strikes law. [Los Angeles Times]

* Davis Polk, which has long had a soft spot for Asia (see first blockquote), launches a Hong Kong law practice. [Am Law Daily]

* The latest law firm to get work out of the BP oil spill: Cozen O’Connor. [Philadelphia Inquirer]

* Shocker: The Supreme Court won’t stay $20,000 in sanctions against Orly Taitz, “Queen of the Birthers.” [The BLT: The Blog of Legal Times]

* Musical chairs: Charles “Chuck” Greenberg — former head of Pepper Hamilton’s sports law practice, and the new managing partner and CEO of the Texas Rangers — is taking his team of sports lawyers to Reed Smith. [Am Law Daily]

* Crowell & Moring gets embroiled in litigation over legal fees and settlement money from a lawsuit arising out of the 1986 hijacking of Pan Am Flight 73 in Pakistan. [ABA Journal]

* Last week was a record week for Cahill. No wonder they paid out mid-year bonuses. [Cahill Gordon & Reindel]

The New York Times has a nice survey piece about all the salary cuts imposed upon American workers. It’s a story that anybody holding down a job through this recession is probably aware of:

Local and state governments, as well as some companies, are squeezing their employees to work the same amount for less money in cost-saving measures that are often described as a last-ditch effort to avoid layoffs.

Yeah, we know, things are crappy.

But in its zeal to show that things are difficult for almost all workers, the Times seems to lump Biglaw in with the group of companies that are trying to cut costs by slashing salaries. As regular readers of Above the Law know, that might have been true in 2009. But in 2010, most Biglaw firms are not cutting associate salaries….

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Stewart Dolin

There was unhappy news out of Chicago last week. Stewart Dolin, an M&A partner at Reed Smith, was struck and killed by a train on Thursday. According to the Chicago Tribune, the coroner has ruled the death a suicide.

Dolin was the co-chair of Reed Smith’s corporate and securities practice. He lived in Glencoe, north of Chicago, and was hit by a northbound train at a Blue Line station in the Loop at 1:45 p.m.

When suicides happen, many firms will turn the person’s website bio into a temporary “in memoriam” page, but Dolin’s bio has been removed. A firm spokesman tells us: “After conferring with the family we kept our communication memorializing Stu internal.”

The managing partner in the Chicago office has issued a statement about Dolin’s death.

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