Religion

  • Amanda Knox

    Copyright, Health Care / Medicine, Law Schools, Midsize Firms / Regional Firms, Morning Docket, Murder, Music, Pets, Religion, SCOTUS, State Judges, Supreme Court, Trials

    Morning Docket: 11.27.13

    * Oh baby (or the lack thereof): the Supreme Court has decided to take on two of the cases asserting religious challenges to the Affordable Care Act’s contraception coverage mandate. [Blog of Legal Times]

    * “[H]e has a Rolodex like a Ferris wheel.” Delaware’s Supreme Court Chief Justice is retiring from the bench to join Potter Anderson & Corroon, where that Rolodex will come in handy. [Wall Street Journal]

    * Italian prosecutors think Amanda Knox should be convicted of murder (again) and given a 30-year sentence in a retrial she’s not even there for. This kind of sounds like it’d be a double-secret conviction. [CNN]

    * With fall finals right around the corner, law students can take comfort in the fact that next week they’ll be soothed by therapy dogs — ones that’ll need therapy after dealing with law students. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * If you’re considering applying to law school against all odds, you should determine when the right time to apply would be. Don’t listen to your parents, listen to your gut. [Law Admissions Lowdown / U.S. News]

    * If you haven’t heard, the Beastie Boys are having a copyright fight with toymaker GoldieBlox over a parody of the song “Girls” that’s been used in a commercial. Fair use? Decide after the jump. [NBC News]

    11 Comments / / Nov 27, 2013 at 9:08 AM
  • Making the guest list and checking it twice.

    Constitutional Law, Diarmuid O'Scannlain, Federalist Society, Law Professors, Quote of the Day, Religion

    Why Does Xenu Love The First Amendment?

    Does the First Amendment contain a “reasonableness” requirement?

    5 Comments / / Nov 15, 2013 at 3:59 PM
  • iStock_000016426678

    Religion

    Snakes in a Church: Should the Law Protect the Religious Liberty of Serpent-Handlers?

    Tennessee law enforcement authorities recently seized approximately 53 snakes, most of them poisonous, from the Tabernacle Church of God in LaFollette, Tennessee. The young pastor of the church, Andrew Hamblin, was arrested for violations of Tennessee Code § 39-17-101, which makes it an offense “for a person to display, exhibit, handle, or use a poisonous […]

    36 Comments / / Nov 14, 2013 at 10:28 AM
  • Scalia's buddy?

    2nd Circuit, Antitrust, Antonin Scalia, Biglaw, Department of Justice, Drugs, Federal Judges, Labor / Employment, Morning Docket, Politics, Religion, SCOTUS, Shira Scheindlin, Supreme Court, Trials

    Morning Docket: 11.07.13

    * “What about devil worshippers?” Justice Scalia may think Satan’s gotten “wilier,” but that doesn’t mean his supporters don’t deserve religious representation in their public meetings. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Speaker of the House John Boehner says that if the Employment Non-Discrimination Act passes, tons of lawsuits will be filed — except that hasn’t happened in states with similar laws. Oopsie… [Reuters]

    * Judge Shira Scheindlin isn’t going to just sit there and allow herself to be kicked off the stop and frisk case. In a rare move, she asked the Second Circuit to reverse its ruling and reinstate her. Go girl! [Reuters]

    * Quinn Emanuel is welcoming a frequent firm-hopper (from Sidley to Clifford Chance to Cleary Gottlieb) into its ranks in D.C. to join Weil defectors Mike Lyle and Eric Lyttle. Best of luck! [Am Law Daily]

    * Gibson Dunn scooped up Scott Hammond, a longtime leaders of the Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division. Query just how large the dangling carrot at the end of the firm’s stick was. [Blog of Legal Times]

    * Till death or criminal charges do we part: troubled lawyer Kent Easter claims he didn’t have the backbone to stand up to his wife. He blames the entire drug-planting scandal on her. [L.A. Now / Los Angeles Times]

    3 Comments / / Nov 7, 2013 at 9:16 AM
  • iStock_000001026615XSmall

    Free Speech, Legal Ethics, Marijuana, Non-Sequiturs, Religion, Sentencing Law

    Non-Sequiturs: 11.04.13

    * The NSA protests that its spying on foreign leaders was entirely legal. In defense of the NSA, this latest uproar seems misplaced. Warrantless spying on Americans is illegal, but spying on foreign governments is kind of the whole point of the NSA. [Associated Press]

    * Judge James Bredar has laid out his thoughts on how sentencing judges should deal with the changing legal landscape surrounding marijuana. This is important because those dumb Guidelines still recommend an enhancement for taking One Toke Over the Line. [Sentencing Law & Policy]

    * Should a plagiarizing journalist be allowed to join the ranks of licensed attorneys? Con: his crime suggests low moral character. Pro: He’s going to be a master of boilerplate. [Juice, Justice & Corgis]

    * Jones Day is representing pro bono a number of Catholic institutions ticked off that they might have to buy insurance that their workers might, at some point, maybe use to buy birth control pills. It’s a tremendous intrusion upon religious liberty that Catholic institutions routinely did before they decided to make a political spectacle out of it. [The National Law Journal]

    * A speech to Harvard Law alums about the slow death of free speech at Harvard. By “slow death of free speech” he details how a private, non-governmental institution decided not to tolerate jackassery, but whatever. [Minding the Campus via The Volokh Conspiracy]

    * It’s still several months until the ATL Law Revue competition. So to keep you entertained until then, check out this parody of Lorde’s Royals performed by some law students. It looks like the same geniuses from Auckland Law School behind the Blurred Lines parody. Do the Kiwis have time to do actual law school stuff? Video embedded after the jump… [Legal Cheek]

    4 Comments / / Nov 4, 2013 at 5:01 PM
  • banner-0

    Canada, Gay, Law Schools, Religion

    Is It Bigoted To Oppose This Christian Law School?

    When a private school bars homosexuality and then seeks accreditation, sparks fly over just who is being the bigot.

    30 Comments / / Oct 24, 2013 at 4:05 PM
  • Louboutin

    Attorney Misconduct, Biglaw, Billable Hours, Crime, Fashion, Federal Judges, Law Schools, Legal Ethics, Morning Docket, Murder, Patton Boggs, Politics, Religion, Shoes, Texas, Trademarks

    Morning Docket: 10.16.13

    * Stop bullying the judges on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court. They don’t cave to just any government data request — they make changes to about 25 percent of them. But uh… they don’t like to talk about the other 75 percent. [Bloomberg] * Everything’s bigger in Texas, including the number of Biglaw firms with […]

    7 Comments / / Oct 16, 2013 at 8:42 AM
  • John_McCain_official_portrait_2009

    Election Law, Football, Free Speech, Larry Lessig, Non-Sequiturs, Religion

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.10.13

    * Who says bipartisanship is dead? Senators McCain and Gillibrand hammer Obama’s nominee for Navy Undersecretary. Gillibrand went after her specifically over prosecuting sexual assaults. [Breaking Defense]

    * Lawyers per capita by state. For everyone who says lawyers make the world worse, note that Arkansas has the fewest lawyers per capita and do with that information what you will. [Law School Tuition Bubble]

    * A bunch of rabbis were arrested for plotting to kidnap and torture a guy into granting a Jewish divorce. This is a thing? [Wall Street Journal]

    * Professor Larry Lessig thinks the administration should have made originalist arguments in the McCutcheon case to salvage campaign finance limits. First, I don’t see why this would have worked. Second, someone in Washington has to be an adult and resist the urge to make stupid arguments just because someone might listen. [The Atlantic]

    * An agent is facing 14 felony counts for giving improper benefits to college athletes. For all the alleged cheating, you’d think UNC would be better at football. [Forbes]

    * A Texas judge ordered a teen to move back in with a sex offender. This was a poor decision. [USA Today]

    * Upon hearing former NYC Mayor David Dinkins saying, “You don’t need to be too smart to be a lawyer, so I went to law school,” the dean of New York Law School said, “So you went to Brooklyn Law School?” Which of course Dinkins did. What is wrong with NYU’s Tribeca campus? [NYLS (exchange begins at 23:00)]

    * Is this related to the law? Not really. Is it the cast of Archer doing the video of Danger Zone? Yes…

    3 Comments / / Oct 10, 2013 at 5:30 PM
  • scalia talking RF

    Antonin Scalia, Clerkships, Constitutional Law, Gay, John Paul Stevens, Religion, Supreme Court, Supreme Court Clerks, Television, Women's Issues

    10 Tasty Tidbits From Justice Antonin Scalia

    A wide-ranging interview with Justice Scalia, covering everything from his pet peeves (women cursing), his tastes in television, and his desire to hire more law clerks from “lesser” law schools.

    37 Comments / / Oct 7, 2013 at 11:13 AM
  • 220px-TomHanksJan2009

    American Constitution Society (ACS), Crime, DUI / DWI, Elizabeth Wurtzel, Jury Duty, Music, Non-Sequiturs, Religion, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    Non-Sequiturs: 09.13.13

    * A lawyer fresh out of law school botched a domestic violence case by gushing all over Tom Hanks… who was serving as a juror. Which, in fairness, was awfully Big of him. [TMZ]

    * Federal prosecutors are seeking at least 27 years in prison for a Massachusetts man who authorities say plotted to kill and eat his children based on a search of his home and car, which is presumably a Saturn. As one law professor observed, “Perhaps the lawyer will make a free exercise argument and claim that eating children is a requirement of his religion.” [CNN]

    * If you’re going to drink and drive, be sure to toss a few back with the judge first. [KVUE]

    * A criminal defense lawyer who begins every cross by making the cop look more humane and respectable. I thought the public defender from My Cousin Vinny was the lowest criminal defense could go in the comical incompetence department. [Katz Justice]

    * Putin crony claims 100 percent of profits in a “public” oil company by flat ignoring minority shareholders. Shhhh! Stop giving Exxon ideas. [Breaking Energy]

    * Elizabeth Wurtzel knows music (a subject she covered for the New Yorker for New York Magazine). In this article, she writes about The Replacements (something Wurtzel has made her past employers, including Boies Schiller, become familiar with). [The Daily Beast]

    * On Monday, the American Constitution Society will host a preview of the upcoming Supreme Court session. Panelists include Pamela Harris, Randy Barnett, Joshua Civin, Andrew Pincus, and David Strauss. [American Constitution Society]

    * Then next Tuesday, The Cato Institute’s Center for Constitutional Studies will host a symposium titled “The Supreme Court: Past and Prologue: A Look at the October 2012 and 2013 Terms.” Panelists include Tom Goldstein, Marcia Coyle, and Howard Bashman. [How Appealing]

    12 Comments / / Sep 13, 2013 at 4:28 PM
  • to-train-up-a-child-21-RF

    Adoption, Books, Crime, Deaths, Kids, Religion, Trials

    The Crazy Parenting Book That Inspired Parents To Kill Daughter (And How To Avoid Another Tragedy)

    The legal regime surrounding adoption is relatively lax, sometimes with tragic results.

    57 Comments / / Sep 11, 2013 at 2:59 PM
  • gay marriage cake RF

    Free Speech, Gay, Gay Marriage, Lesbians, Pictures, Politics, Religion, Weddings

    Why Using Anti-Discrimination Laws Against Wedding Photographers Doesn’t Work

    Conservative columnist Tamara Tabo argues against using the law to force businesses to provide services to same-sex couples’ weddings.

    145 Comments / / Sep 5, 2013 at 10:20 AM
  • Pope Gregory XIII RF

  • headscarf LF

    Bar Exams, Religion, Screw-Ups

    Massachusetts Bar Changes Rules After Ridiculous Mid-Exam Religious Dustup

    What is the state doing about its archaic test-taking rules regarding religious headwear?

    37 Comments / / Aug 23, 2013 at 12:15 PM
  • Airlines Hit Hard By SARS, War And Weak Economy

    Antitrust, Constitutional Law, Election Law, Free Speech, Politics, Religion, Texas, Videos

    Laws Make Strange Bedfellows

    Antitrust, Sharia law, voter suppression, it’s a legal potpourri…

    16 Comments / / Aug 16, 2013 at 5:11 PM
  • nativity scene with hand-colored figures made out of wood

    Kids, Rank Stupidity, Religion

    Court Orders Baby’s Name Changed From ‘Messiah’ Because It’s The South

    Religious zealotry shows up in chancery court, ordering a name change based on a complete lack of legal and religious understanding.

    30 Comments / / Aug 12, 2013 at 1:21 PM
  • Discriminatory bottle service for old dudes?

    3rd Circuit, Biglaw, Civil Rights, Deaths, Defamation, Drinking, Education / Schools, Health Care / Medicine, Job Searches, Law Reviews, Morning Docket, New Jersey, Nude Dancing, Parties, Politics, Rape, Religion, State Judges, State Judges Are Clowns, Williams Mullen, Women's Issues

    Morning Docket: 08.05.13

    * When it comes to the Affordable Care Act’s contraception coverage mandate, corporate personhood only goes so far. Religious freedoms apply to human beings, not their businesses, and the Third Circuit agrees. [New York Times]

    * According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the legal sector added 2,800 jobs in July after major losses in the two months prior. We’re sure that the eleventy billion members of the class of 2013 will be very pleased. [Am Law Daily]

    * Not a Nigerian scam: Biglaw firms in Washington, D.C. — like Covington & Burling, Greenberg Traurig, and Williams Mullen — are busy chasing business in Africa. [Capital Business / Washington Post]

    * A New Jersey municipal judge faces ethics charges due to his “extra-judicial activities” with an exotic dancer. It seems she appeared before him in his courtroom and in his bed. [New Jersey Law Journal]

    * Tawana Brawley, the woman who dragged a New York prosecutor into an elaborate rape hoax (complete with race-baiting), is finally making payments on a defamation verdict. [New York Post]

    * “Either I’m a stupid lawyer, or I’m stupid for thinking the court will enforce the rights of guys.” Former Cravath attorney and men’s rights advocate Roy Den Hollander is at it again. [New York Daily News]

    * Morehouse College will be the fifth undergraduate school in the nation to publish a law journal. This is basically a case study in what it means to begin law school gunning while in college. [Daily Report]

    * Things are pretty dire for New York City mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner. Not even “that [law grad] who takes pictures of himself in his underwear in the mirror” would vote for him. [Delaware News Journal]

    * Julius Chambers, famous civil rights lawyer and former leader of the NAACP LDF, RIP. [NBC News]

    0 Comments / / Aug 5, 2013 at 9:04 AM
  • iStock_000003479866XSmall-RF

    Antonin Scalia, Bar Exams, Crime, Gay, Religion, Securities and Exchange Commission, Securities Law

    Slow News Week of Satire and Ho-Hum Courtroom ‘Drama’

    The Week in Review for one of the slowest news weeks in a while.

    6 Comments / / Aug 2, 2013 at 3:49 PM