Sentencing Law

  • Left to right: Eric Cuellar, Hazhir Kargaran, and Justin Teixeira (click to enlarge).

    Animal Law, Boalt Hall, Crime, Deaths, Law Schools, Sentencing Law, Violence

    A Final Guilty Plea in the Berkeley Bird Beheading

    The sad story of the Berkeley bird beheading comes to a close, as the third and final defendant pleads guilty.

    33 Comments / / Jun 13, 2013 at 4:39 PM
  • Supreme Court SCOTUS photo by David Lat

    Constitutional Law, Crime, Elena Kagan, SCOTUS, Sentencing Law, Supreme Court

    Does the Ex Post Facto Clause Apply To Suggestions?

    We’re still waiting on an affirmative action ruling, but yesterday the Supreme Court handed down an interesting decision on the Ex Post Facto Clause and the federal sentencing guidelines.

    1 Comment / / Jun 11, 2013 at 12:45 PM
  • Righteous Indignation RF

    Constitutional Law, Crime, Death Penalty, Politics, Sentencing Law

    Why We Can’t Have Nice Things: The Death Penalty Dilemma

    A conservative’s argument against the death penalty.

    29 Comments / / May 30, 2013 at 10:06 AM
  • Holdem

    Death Penalty, Gambling, Gambling / Gaming, Jury Duty, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Religion, Sentencing Law, State Attorneys General, Tax Law, Videos

    Morning Docket: 05.23.13

    * Online gambling wants to come back to the U.S. after the government cracked down last year. Anybody want odds on whether this works? [Wall Street Journal]

    * In news that only affects those who want to dress like whores, Abercrombie & Fitch and Hollister may systematically mistreat the disabled. [Fox News]

    * Post-disaster price gouging is sad, but inevitable. Oklahoma’s Attorney General E. Scott Pruitt is having none of it. [The National Law Journal]

    * Obama will address drone policy and Gitmo in a security speech today because, after the last couple weeks of scandal, he’s hoping to introduce fodder for another round of withering criticism. [Huffington Post]

    * The Daily Caller is all over the idea that Michelle Obama may have dated the Inspector General of the IRS at Harvard Law. Which proves… actually I have no idea if the Daily Caller even knows why this might be significant. [Daily Caller]

    * U.S. and Chinese law schools are collaborating more. American law schools are really desperate to open themselves to more students, aren’t they? [China Daily]

    * The Jodi Arias jury may not be able to make a decision on sentencing. If you cared about this story at all, you’ve already heard Nancy Grace’s opinion. [NBC News]

    * Elie argues with folks about Greece v. Galloway and legislative prayer. Video after the jump… [Huff Post Live]

    4 Comments / / May 23, 2013 at 9:03 AM
  • Jodi Arias

    Biglaw, Commencement, Crime, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Morning Docket, Murder, Sentencing Law, State Judges, State Judges Are Clowns, Trials

    Morning Docket: 05.10.13

    * Growth was “steady” for New York’s top firms, with Latham & Watkins and Skadden Arps leading the pack in terms of gross revenue — which wasn’t surprising, considering their Am Law 100 gross revenue ranking. [New York Law Journal]

    * Dewey know when we’ll be able to stop using this pun? Hmm, at this rate, probably never. Steve Otillar and Citi recently settled their dueling suits over the ex-D&L partner’s capital contribution loan to the failed firm. [Am Law Daily]

    * Cahill Gordon was supposed to investigate the Rutgers basketball scandal, but the firm cited a conflict of interest, so Skadden Arps stepped in. [Insert the joke of your choice here. I don’t like or watch this sport.] [Reuters]

    * Surely you’ve heard about Justice Orie Melvin’s sentence by now. As it turns out, shaming a judge like you’d shame your dog online might not be enforceable… which is too bad. [Pittsburgh Post-Gazette]

    * When we last spoke about “controversial” commencement speakers, we didn’t bring up the fact that Nancy Pelosi would be pulling double duty at UC Davis and Baltimore. Thoughts? [National Law Journal]

    * She’s got a death wish: the aggravation phase of the Jodi Arias trial was postponed at the last minute yesterday, and some think it’s because of the interview she gave after the verdict was announced. [CNN]

    0 Comments / / May 10, 2013 at 9:06 AM
  • Casey Anthony

    2nd Circuit, American Bar Association / ABA, Bail, Bankruptcy, Biglaw, Copyright, Department of Justice, Enron, Google / Search Engines, Jeffrey Skilling, Law Schools, Money, Morning Docket

    Morning Docket: 05.09.13

    * Right about now, the Second Circuit is wondering why authors are suing Google and crying infringement over the Internet company’s e-book project, especially since digitization could benefit so many of them. [Thomson Reuters News & Insight]

    * This is the end of an era of legal battles: Jeffrey Skilling, Enron’s former chief executive officer, is getting a little shaved off the top of his 24-year prison sentence thanks to a deal with the Department of Justice. He’ll be out in 2017. [CNBC]

    * Biglaw expected to have a slow start in 2013, but no one expected it to be this slow. The latest Citi report wasn’t exactly encouraging; on average, firms saw a 0.2% increase in revenue during the first quarter. [Am Law Daily]

    * In the past decade, the American Bar Association has created six task forces to explore changing the face of legal education as we know it. Funny… nothing’s really changed. [National Law Journal]

    * Bail for Ariel Castro, the accused Cleveland kidnapper, has been set at $8 million. “Just think of how many ribs and salsa albums could be bought with that, bro,” said Charles Ramsey. [Chicago Tribune]

    * Casey Anthony had a bankruptcy hearing yesterday, but that news was overshadowed because everyone cared more about the girl who wasn’t going to get away with murder. [Orlando Sentinel]

    1 Comment / / May 9, 2013 at 9:13 AM
  • 220px-Weev-selfportrait-prophet-RF

    Crime, Sentencing Law, Technology, U.S. Attorneys Offices

    Internet Hacker Sentenced to Prison Garners Ill-Conceived Support

    Andrew Auernheimer receives 41-month prison sentence. It may be too severe, but Auernheimer was asking for it.

    18 Comments / / Mar 19, 2013 at 11:02 AM
  • Kevin Ring LF

    Attorney Misconduct, Crime, Department of Justice, Federal Government, Federal Judges, Jack Abramoff, Legal Ethics, Sentencing Law, Tim Wu, White-Collar Crime

    The Kevin Ring Case Is a Scandal and a Disgrace: Five Things I Think You Should Know

    A highly subjective look at the case against Jack Abramoff associate Kevin Ring. The writer, a friend of Ring’s, argues it was a miscarriage of justice.

    34 Comments / / Feb 28, 2013 at 5:49 PM
  • Supreme Court SCOTUS photo by David Lat

    Crime, Federal Judges, SCOTUS, Sentencing Law, Supreme Court

    Today at the Supreme Court: Moving The Starting Point

    What happened at the U.S. Supreme Court today? Our SCOTUS correspondent, Matt Kaiser, offers an eyewitness report.

    5 Comments / / Feb 26, 2013 at 4:55 PM
  • tiffany box

    Airplanes / Aviation, Basketball, Biglaw, Blogging, Contracts, Douglas Berman, Education / Schools, Environment / Environmental Law, Federal Government, Intellectual Property, Law Professors, Mergers and Acquisitions, Morning Docket, Politics, Sentencing Law, State Judges, Trademarks, Wall Street

    Morning Docket: 02.15.13

    * What to do when your federal agency’s website has been hacked by Anonymous and you’re unable to post a major report online for public dissemination? Well, just ask a law professor to do it for you on his blog; that’s not embarrassing, not at all. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * The many victims of the Deepwater Horizon disaster can now rejoice, because yesterday, Transocean pleaded guilty to violating the Clean Water Act, and will pay the second-largest environmental fine in United States history to the tune of $400 million. [CNN]

    * Money takes flight: eleventy billion Biglaw firms are behind the beast that is this awful airline merger, but taking the lead are lawyers from Weil Gotshal for AMR and Latham & Watkins for US Airways. [Am Law Daily]

    * After questioning the validity of one of the NBA players union’s contracts, Paul Weiss is withholding details about it thanks to the government’s intrusion. Way to block nepotism’s alleged slam dunk. [New York Times]

    * “When is the last time you took the biggest financial institutions on Wall Street to trial?” Elizabeth Warren took the Socratic method to the Senate Banking Committee and she was applauded for it. [National Law Journal]

    * If you liked it, then perhaps you should’ve put a ring on it, but not a Tiffany’s diamond engagement ring that you’ve purchased from Costco, because according to this trademark lawsuit, it may be a knockoff. [Bloomberg]

    * “We feel very badly for Megan Thode.” A Pennsylvania judge ruled against the Lehigh student who sued over her grade of C+ because let’s be serious, did ANYONE AT ALL really think he wouldn’t do that?! [Morning Call]

    7 Comments / / Feb 15, 2013 at 9:09 AM
  • 53127510-RF

    Crime, D.C. Circuit, Jack Abramoff, Sentencing Law, White-Collar Crime

    Prosecutors Gone Wild: The Case of Kevin Ring

    Prosecutors have waaay too much power to bully non-cooperators.

    12 Comments / / Feb 13, 2013 at 1:39 PM
  • Judge Lynn Hughes

    2nd Circuit, Cyberlaw, DealBreaker, Free Speech, Kellogg Huber, Racism, SCOTUS, Sentencing Law, Supreme Court

    Non-Sequiturs: 02.07.13

    * Above the Law promotes real-world change! Complaint filed against a Texas judge after Elie calls him out for being RACEIST! [ABA Journal]

    * If you were thinking of calling your friend from the Philippines a “skank” on Facebook, you may want to reconsider. [Philippine Inquirer]

    * If you’re a powerful financial executive, lay off the bath salts. [DealBreaker]

    * Judicial throwdown at the Second Circuit! Short version: Judge Raagi thinks Judge Jacobs should care way more about punishing guys sexting underage girls. Judge Jacobs thinks Judge Raagi watches too much Dexter. [Second Circuit / FindLaw]

    * Federal District Judge John Lungstrum calls out a couple trial teams for terrible trial work. Biglaw litigators may not be the best trial attorneys? You don’t say. [New York Personal Injury Attorney Blog]

    * Kenneth Anderson describes the U.S. government’s longstanding love affair with “imminence” in the context of the Obama drone strike white paper. To borrow from Rev. Lovejoy’s sermon: “Imminence…sweet imminence.” [Lawfare]

    * Judges: If you’re going to base a decision on a particular fact… don’t include pictures in the opinion that directly contradict that finding. Check out page six, line two and Appendix 2 [Court of Appeals, State of Oregon]

    * SCOTUSBlog and Bloomberg Law have a competition for law students. Beat your peers AND the SCOTUSBlog team and win $5000. [SCOTUSBlog]

    2 Comments / / Feb 7, 2013 at 5:47 PM
  • Breaking Bad RF

    Crime, Drugs, Law Professors, Law Schools, Randy Barnett, Sentencing Law

    Breaking Bad at a Leading Law School: T14 Law Student Sentenced to Four Years for Meth Dealing

    If you were a student at a top 14 law school with an above-average GPA, why would you risk it all by selling meth?

    93 Comments / / Feb 1, 2013 at 10:16 AM
  • judge RF learned judge

    Crime, Guns / Firearms, Reader Polls, Sentencing Law

    You Be The Judge: Can Judges Order Fines For Outside Their Jurisdiction?

    Should judges be allowed to impose fines that benefit those outside the jurisdiction? Even if the fine is going to charity?

    6 Comments / / Jan 24, 2013 at 11:25 AM
  • beer

    Crime, Drinking, Police, Sentencing Law, Tobacco / Smoking

    Inmates Claim Alcohol Forced Itself Down Their Throats, Seek Damages

    Inmates sue alcohol companies, as if they were ever sober enough to read a warning label…

    12 Comments / / Jan 8, 2013 at 11:11 AM
  • middle finger lights

    ACLU, Antonin Scalia, Bernie Madoff, Biglaw, Crime, Deaths, Federal Judges, Football, Free Speech, Law Schools, Mergers and Acquisitions, Morning Docket, Partner Issues, Prisons, Robert Bork, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, SCOTUS, Sentencing Law, State Judges, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 12.21.12

    * Seven out of nine sitting Supreme Court justices were silent when it came to the passing of Robert Bork. Justice Antonin Scalia, of course, issued a public statement, as did liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (surprise!). [WSJ Law Blog (sub. req.)]

    * No one ever really doubted that it would take an army of Biglaw lawyers from the likes of Sullivan & Cromwell, Shearman & Sterling, and Wachtel Lipton to handle a monumental deal like the proposed $8.2 billion NYSE/ICE merger. [Am Law Daily]

    * Can you coach with Nick Saban and be a Miller Canfield partner at the same time? No. But you can sue (and win!) when the firm allegedly forces you out due to its “culture of fear and intimidation.” [Detroit Free Press]

    * Justice Rolando Acosta, who wrote the opinion upholding the dismissal of the class action case against NYLS, rates well among his peers as a nominee for the New York Court of Appeals. [New York Law Journal]

    * Peter Madoff was sentenced to ten years in prison for his role in Bernie Madoff’s Ponzi scheme, but the judge will probably let him go to his granddaughter’s bat mitzvah before shipping him to the pokey. [Bloomberg]

    * Merry Christmas, now go f**k yourself. A federal judge has given a woman in Louisiana free rein to display holiday lights on her roof in the form of an extended middle finger. God bless America. [CBS 3 Springfield]

    7 Comments / / Dec 21, 2012 at 9:07 AM
  • hammer-ring

    American Bar Association / ABA, Bankruptcy, Biglaw, Crime, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Divorce Train Wrecks, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Sentencing Law, Texas, UVA Law

    Morning Docket: 12.20.12

    * “As a lawyer, this is very sad for me.” Al Togut, the prominent attorney pulling all of the strings behind the curtain of the Dewey & LeBoeuf bankruptcy filings, wishes that there was some way that the firm could’ve been saved. [Am Law Daily]

    * Guys at my law school used to break into the registrar’s office to steal transcript paper all the time; it was no big deal. No really, as far as sentencing goes, apparently doing such a thing isn’t that big of a deal in Virginia. [Daily Progress]

    * That’s some nice lipstick you’ve got there, pig: Lincoln Memorial University’s Duncan School of Law is still trying to get ABA accreditation by changing everything it can, including its lax admissions standards. [Knoxville News Sentinel]

    * Even though Peter Madoff’s supporters showered the court with with letters filled with compliments ahead of his sentencing, the Ponzi victims aren’t exactly showing him the same kind of love. [WSJ Law Blog (sub. req.)]

    * This law firm in Texas is trying to make getting divorced a more pleasurable experience, so they invented something called the “Divorce Resort” — because there’s nothing like a four-star train wreck. [Huffington Post]

    2 Comments / / Dec 20, 2012 at 9:05 AM
  • bride holding a bouquet

    2nd Circuit, ACLU, Biglaw, China, Insider Trading, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Prisons, Religion, Sentencing Law, Solo Practitioners, State Judges, State Judges Are Clowns, Student Loans, Weddings

    Morning Docket: 12.05.12

    * Mirror, mirror, on the wall, which is the fairest firm of them all? According to the 2012 Acritas Brand Index survey, the current leader of the Global 100 is the most powerful Biglaw brand for the fifth year in a row. [American Lawyer]

    * But that might not last for long, considering the dilemma Baker & McKenzie is facing when it comes to joining the Shanghai Bar Association in China. The firm is one of the first to indicate that it’ll take the plunge. [Wall Street Journal]

    * Thanks to the Second Circuit, Rajat Gupta will be a free man on bail pending the appeal of his insider trading conviction. We wonder what Benula Bensam would have to say about this new twist. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * Jason Smiekel, the lawyer who pleaded guilty in a murder-for-hire plot involving a former client, was sentenced to eight and a half years in federal prison. The things men will do for HHHBs. [Chicago Tribune]

    * Student loan payments: coming to a paycheck deduction near you! Congress is considering an overhaul of the country’s student debt collection practices, and Rep. Tom Petri has some interesting ideas. [Bloomberg]

    * The Cleveland-Marshall College of Law is the latest school to hop aboard the solo practice incubator train, but graduates will have to rent their office space from the school. Nice. /sarcasm [National Law Journal]

    * “We didn’t file this complaint lightly.” Sorry, Judge Norman, but as it turns out, you can’t just sentence a teenager to attend church for 10 years as a condition of parole without pissing off the ACLU. [Tulsa World]

    * When your alterations cost more than your wedding gown, it’s pretty much a given that you’ll have some problems — ones worth suing over, if you’re a true bridezilla (like moi). [Thomson Reuters News & Insight]

    3 Comments / / Dec 5, 2012 at 9:07 AM

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