Trademarks

  • Hilary Bricken

    Intellectual Property, Marijuana, Trademarks

    Dude, Where’s My Marijuana Trademark?

    Great companies have great brands, and this is true for great cannabis businesses, too.

    / Mar 9, 2015 at 4:20 PM
  • Amal Clooney

    Morning Docket

    Morning Docket: 03.09.15

    * Amal Clooney, the attorney who tamed George Clooney’s heart and is now considered one of the most famous human rights lawyers in the world, will be teaching at a New York law school this spring. Which one? We’ll have more on this fun news later today. [USA Today]

    * Talk about a Hail Mary play: The ACLU has decided to come to the defense of a very unlikely cause. Per a recently filed federal brief, the organization thinks that the USPTO’s cancellation of the Redskins trademark was unconstitutional. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * According to a new BARBRI study, the vast majority of third-year law students think they’re ready to go when it comes to practicing law, but the lawyers who have had the (dis)pleasure to work with new graduates don’t seem to agree. [National Law Journal]

    * “Those kinds of jobs are never going to be enough to absorb the number of people graduating from law school over the next five or 10 years.” Northeastern’s dean laughs in Biglaw’s face — his grads measure their success in other ways. [Boston Business Journal]

    * Ellen Pao’s “racy” gender discrimination lawsuit against Kleiner Perkins serves as a harsh criticism of the sexist culture of Silicon Valley. Luckily, jury members will be able to busy themselves with the case’s more lurid details. [The Upshot / New York Times]

    * Kyle McEntee of Law School Transparency is working on a new podcast that will help prospective law students to see what working in the legal profession is really like. “I Am The Law” debuted in January 2015, and it’s worth a listen. [U.S. News & World Report]

    5 Comments / / Mar 9, 2015 at 8:52 AM
  • US china flags

    China

    Selling Your Product Into China Via A Distributor Agreement

    There are a lot of ways to sell your product in China. Whichever you choose, make sure you’ve protected yourself.

    / Feb 23, 2015 at 10:06 AM
  • 6a00d8341c4eab53ef01bb07f33339970d-640wi

    Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 02.18.15

    * Bill Clinton’s professor thought Bubba should have taught tax law. Then maybe something could have trumped this tale. [TaxProf Blog]

    * If you’re looking for a hell of a procedural fact pattern, try to unravel the gay marriage situation in Alabama. [PrawfsBlawg]

    * Do law professors get lazier over time? [The Volokh Conspiracy / Washington Post]

    * Our own Tamara Tabo joined the folks at The Docket to discuss 50 Shades of Grey. [MSNBC]

    * The USPTO is dumb enough to think people might confuse the Angry Asian Man blog and a children’s comic book called Angry Little Asian Girl, and now a trademark fight is brewing because the author of the latter has… become the latter. [Angry Asian Man]

    * Lawyer and bike enthusiast tells bikers they’re part of the problem. Did this need to be said? [Outside Online]

    32 Comments / / Feb 18, 2015 at 4:58 PM
  • Left Shark

    Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 02.11.15

    * Katy Perry’s lawyers from Greenberg Traurig lob another volley at the sculptor of Left Shark. Amazingly, they’re trying to use his sculpture in their trademark application. Can’t make this up. [Political Sculptor] * Former ATL Lawyer of the Year, Paul Weiss’s Roberta Kaplan, has an interesting new project. She’s asking Americans to co-sign an […]

    17 Comments / / Feb 11, 2015 at 5:06 PM
  • Bulls balls

    Trademarks

    Red Bull Wants To Castrate Old Ox​

    Red Bull thinks consumers don’t know the difference between a beer and a bull.

    1 Comment / / Feb 10, 2015 at 3:48 PM
  • Taylor Swift

    Morning Docket

    Morning Docket: 01.30.15

    * Next time on Nancy Grace: A recent graduate of Michigan State Law allegedly got a master’s degree student from the school pregnant twice before he left the country. The woman allegedly murdered one of the babies, and the other is now missing. [Detroit Free Press]

    * I’ll just leave this right here so I won’t get fined. It looks like a partner from Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton helped Marshawn Lynch trademark his nickname “Beast Mode” — a trademark that may lead to Lynch getting a $100,000 fine from the NFL. [Am Law Daily]

    * In other trademark news, Taylor Swift got approval for catchphrases from her album. “Nice to Meet You, Where You Been?” Her IP lawyers “Could Show You Incredible Things,” but you could’ve been getting down to “This Sick Beat.” [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Gibson Dunn earned $459,000 for successfully challenging Virginia’s ban on same-sex marriage, which was apparently a “sharp cut” in the fees the firm initially requested for star litigator Ted Olson’s time. Poor Teddy. [National Law Journal]

    * According to Am Law’s latest Lateral Partners Survey, there was a 7 percent increase in lateral moves — 2,736, to be precise — between Oct. 1, 2013 and Sept. 30, 2014. Guaranteed pay packages, though, seem to be a thing of the past. [American Lawyer]

    * The K&L Gates Cyber Civil Rights Legal Project, a clinic that’s perhaps better known as the firm’s revenge porn project, is assisting a California law student whose nude pictures and videos were allegedly put online by an ex. [DealBook / New York Times]

    9 Comments / / Jan 30, 2015 at 9:08 AM
  • xw1

    Pro Se Litigants

    Judge Thinks X-Wing Lawsuit Is As Dumb As We Did

    The guy suing Disney so he can build a real-life X-Wing has lost. But the judge gives us some grade A trolling.

    23 Comments / / Jan 16, 2015 at 11:50 AM
  • beer craft beer

    Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 01.15.14

    beer craft beer* Lagunitas sued Sierra Nevada over beer. Beer connoisseurs pulled themselves out of their own vomit to tweet their disapproval. And it worked, Lagunitas dropped the suit. Imagine if we could harness the power of drunks for good. Or evil. Just anything. [SF Gate]

    * Musing that maybe that daunting LSAT was the obstacle keeping students from filling seats, University of San Diego Law just opened up the school to USD grads — no LSAT required. [University of San Diego School of Law]

    * Saks has heard the public backlash against its assertion that transgender people deserve no legal protections in the workplace and responded by… reasserting that transgendered people have no rights. [Slate]

    * Fashion law isn’t just for Elle Woods acolytes anymore. [Racked]

    * Ninth Circuit does not take kindly to a state prosecutor who lied under oath. [Seeking-Justice]

    * SCOTUS justices don’t have to recuse themselves, and when they do, they don’t have to explain why. Let’s look at the recusals this Term and venture a guess at why each justice sat out. [Fix the Court]

    * NY subways boast some ridiculous safety posters to cover themselves legally. Here’s a breakdown of their latest efforts. [NY Observer]

    * Checking in on the always messed up developments down at Manhattan Supreme Court. [Wise Law NY]

    * “Good news for law grads and law schools!” article ends up buried in a sea of caveats. Because of course it does. [TaxProf Blog]

    8 Comments / / Jan 15, 2015 at 5:33 PM
  • internet

    Technology

    Legal Considerations for Web Based Start-Ups

    Mobile Internet usage is predicted to grow faster in the next few years, making online or web based businesses great opportunities. What does that mean for you if you are starting an online business?

    / Dec 22, 2014 at 9:07 AM
  • Uhh... thanks for the bonus?

    Morning Docket

    Morning Docket: 12.18.14

    * Many Biglaw firms seem to be dragging their feet to match Davis Polk’s generous bonus scale. Why’s that? According to one partner, these bonus matches have cut into his firm’s profits by about 4 percent. Yikes! [The Economist]

    * Total 1L enrollment in law school is the lowest it’s been since 1973, when there were 53 fewer schools. The next step would be to reduce tuition to 1973 levels, and then no one would have any more complaints. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * Just because Bingham McCutchen bit the big one, it doesn’t mean that all of its pro bono cases will have to suffer the same fate. Not only did Morgan Lewis rescue most of the firm’s attorneys, but it’s also saving 500 of its pro bono cases. [Am Law Daily]

    * Now that President Obama has decided to reopen diplomatic relations with Cuba, lawyers are champing at the bit for more business opportunities. Love Cuban cigars? Well, lawyers love trademark disputes involving those cigars. [National Law Journal]

    * Greenberg Traurig reminds Florida clerks that if they issue gay marriage licenses, they could be criminally charged. Plaintiffs’ attorneys remind Florida clerks that if they refuse to issue gay marriage licenses, they could be sued. [Tampa Bay Times]

    * Our managing editor, David Lat, sat down with Vivia Chen to dish about some of his favorite things, from his new book, Supreme Ambitions (affiliate link), to his new fiancé. Her book review: “I liked it! It’s a fun, breezy read.” Hooray! [The Careerist]

    15 Comments / / Dec 18, 2014 at 9:01 AM
  • HungerGamesPoster

    Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 12.09.14

    * New Jersey’s new tort liability ruling is an important first step to a real-life Hunger Games. [The Legal Blitz]

    * A holiday shopping guide to beer and wine involved in intellectual property disputes. Clever. [Trademark and Copyright Law Blog]

    * “There’s an app for that!” Lawyers create “Driving While Black” app for your smartphone. [The Oregonian]

    * Speaking of Oregon, the University of Oregon is in the midst of a teaching strike that not only impacts its football team, but caused an immigration law issue when statements the school made were interpreted as threats to the immigration status of foreign teachers if they joined the strike. [Daily Nous]

    * According to Dean LeDuc, Thomas M. Cooley Law is sad that it failed to sell the Mason Temple building in downtown Lansing to the state senate. Except there’s not really any mention that the state senate was ever interested. Perhaps their interest was reported by the same people behind the Cooley Rankings. [Lansing City Pulse]

    * If you liked Mark Hermann’s rundown of business development tactics, here some other suggestions for what more lawyers and law students could be doing to develop business. [Law and More]

    * New OSHA rules a-comin’. [Lawyers, Guns & Money]

    3 Comments / / Dec 9, 2014 at 5:30 PM
  • xw1

    Pro Se Litigants

    Guy Sues Disney For Not Letting Him Build A Working X-Wing And Making $930 Million

    But before the complaint is over we learn about how great Florida State is at football and get a review of world literature.

    17 Comments / / Nov 25, 2014 at 12:40 PM
  • 220px-Winterfresh5

    Intellectual Property, Trademarks

    Wrigley Opposes The Trademark ‘WTF’

    Wrigley seeks to protect its stale, dry gum from Internet slang….

    12 Comments / / Nov 18, 2014 at 2:00 PM
  • china

    China, Intellectual Property, International Law, Patents, Trademarks

    How to Protect Against China Counterfeiting

    If you sell or outsource your products to China, you should anticipate infringement of your intellectual property.

    5 Comments / / Nov 3, 2014 at 10:15 AM
  • pizza pepperoni pizza

  • Grover

    Abortion, Antonin Scalia, Books, Football, Law Schools, Non-Sequiturs, Trademarks

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.30.14

    * Using children’s books to describe the legal academy. It also works for law firms. Like The Monster at the End of This Book (affiliate link), about an associate who fears and reviles an overbearing partner and then learns (about 8 years in) that they’ve had the monster within them all along. [lawprofblawg]

    * In advance of its showdown before the Supreme Court, UPS changes its policy, but denies wrongdoing. [Redline]

    * I’ve never been called a Greek Chorus before. I like it. [Law and More]

    * Reproductive & Sexual Health and Justice senior legal analysts Imani Gandy and Jessica Mason Pieklo discuss both voting rights and abortion access in Texas with political reporter Andrea Grimes. [RH Reality Check]

    * Op-ed notes that Obamacare opponents are cherry-picking their history. Are there actually Obamacare opponents left? [Washington Post]

    * A week or so ago I made a joke about OSU Coach Mike “I’m a Man! I’m 40!” Gundy. Apparently he tried to trademark it. [Campus Insiders]

    * LFC360 chats with Bentham IMF’s Ralph Sutton about making Biglaw more affordable with third-party litigation funding. [LFC360]

    * A list of the top 100 Wild Men and Wild Women in history. Justice Scalia, Racehorse Haynes and David Boies all make the list. I get why he went with Haynes, but when it comes to a Texas litigation “wild man,” I think Joe Jamail. [What About Clients?]

    7 Comments / / Oct 30, 2014 at 5:15 PM
  • Supreme Court Justice Seamus McCaffrey

    DUI / DWI, Election Law, Law Schools, Non-Sequiturs, Pornography, Pro Se Litigants, State Judges, Television, Trademarks

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.27.14

    * After being temporarily suspended as part of “Porngate” for trafficking in “highly demeaning portrayals of members of various segments of the population, including women, elderly persons, and uniformed school girls,” Seamus McCaffrey retires from the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. [Philadelphia Daily News]

    * A group of women lawyers in Miami has called for NBC to cancel Bad Judge because it “depicts a female judge as unethical, lazy, crude, hyper-sexualized, and unfit to hold such an esteemed position of power.” Indeed there’s no place for depicting women judges that way on TV. Especially when Miami is perfectly capable of depicting them that way in real life. [Crushable]

    * Epic trademark infringement. [Legal Cheek]

    * Crazy pro se guy slapped down in Canada. [Lowering the Bar]

    * While almost everyone else is seeing lower applications, USC Law saw a 5 percent bump. [USC Gould School of Law]

    * Stanford and Dartmouth in hot water over election law charges in Montana. Apparently piercing the imaginary veil of non-partisanship in judicial elections is the problem and not the whole idea of judicial elections in the first place. [Montana Standard]

    5 Comments / / Oct 27, 2014 at 4:36 PM