United Kingdom / Great Britain

  • mini graduation cap on money

    1st Circuit, Biglaw, California, Celebrities, Confirmations, Crime, Football, Gender, Lateral Moves, Law Professors, Law School Deans, Law Schools, Money, Morning Docket, Partner Issues, Texas, United Kingdom / Great Britain

    Morning Docket: 05.23.14

    * Congrats are in order for David Barron. The Harvard Law professor was confirmed to the First Circuit in a close vote (53-45), despite his apparent allegiance to our new drone overlords. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Another one bites the dust: Weil’s London banking leader Stephen Lucas decamped for Kirkland & Ellis. The firm retorted by saying: “We have got 40 finance lawyers left.” Aww, yay for you. [The Lawyer]

    * We already know that state prosecutors are very poorly paid, but let’s go one step further and see if women are paid less than men. Shockingly enough, women are getting the shaft in Texas. [Texas Tribune]

    * Dean Jack Boger of UNC Law is stepping down, but he’s proud of keeping legal ed affordable. “[B]y relative standards, we’re still doing that,” he said. It’s ~$39K for out-of-state students. [Chapelboro.com]

    * O.J. Simpson’s lawyers submitted a gigantic legal doc in an attempt to get him a new trial for his armed-robbery case. Court word limit: 14,000. Words in the Juice’s motion: 19,993. Rules: LOL. [NBC News]

    0 Comments / / May 23, 2014 at 9:00 AM
  • Hand and money staircase isolated on white background

    Biglaw, Magic Circle, Money, United Kingdom / Great Britain

    Could Raises At Global Law Firms Signal More Raises For All?

    Some lawyers are getting raises. Could you be next?

    22 Comments / / May 12, 2014 at 1:40 PM
  • 233 West 21st Street 5CD 1

    Fabulosity, Gay, Lawyerly Lairs, Money, Real Estate, United Kingdom / Great Britain

    Lawyerly Lairs: A Law Clerk’s $1.7 Million Apartment

    How can a law clerk afford such an expensive apartment? Well, he’s not your ordinary “law clerk.”

    41 Comments / / May 8, 2014 at 5:33 PM
  • George Clooney LF Michael Clayton

  • atl-schools-ranking-logo

    Gay Marriage, Military / Military Law, Non-Sequiturs, Rankings, SCOTUS, State Judges, Supreme Court, United Kingdom / Great Britain, War on Terror

    Non-Sequiturs: 04.22.14

    * Ready for the ATL Top 50 Law School Rankings? They will be revealed next week on the next episode of Kaplan’s The 180 — Live. [The 180 — Live / Kaplan]

    * Georgia is now the 31st state with an active marriage equality lawsuit. Justice Scalia now really wants a revolt. [Associated Press via ABC News]

    * Stetson boasted the best bar passage rate in Florida. See how that’s a better fact to tout than “5th out of 11“? [Ocala Star Banner]

    * A key member of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed’s defense team is leaving the Army because they were going to force him to leave the defense to attend a graduate course in Virginia. The kneejerk, liberal reaction is that this is a conspiracy to derail his defense. I highly doubt it. From my experience, the Army’s counterproductive decisions are staunchly arbitrary. [Huffington Post]

    * Derek Khanna takes on the Aereo case before the Supreme Court ruins it for all of us. [Politix]

    * Britain’s just like a cute little America. They have conservative politicians trying to win votes through nonsensical religious exclusion too. [What About Clients]

    * Last time we checked in on Judge Carlos Cortez, he was defending himself against charges that he strangled and threatened to kill a girlfriend. Apparently things have gotten much, much darker down there in Texas. [Dallas Morning News]

    1 Comment / / Apr 22, 2014 at 5:01 PM
  • DLA Piper won't 'like' this lawsuit.

    Facebook, Jury Duty, Law Schools, Non-Sequiturs, Student Loans, United Kingdom / Great Britain

    Non-Sequiturs: 04.17.14

    * Cheerios is claiming that “Liking” them on Facebook constitutes a waiver of the right to sue. Let’s take this moment to encourage everyone to Like Above the Law on Facebook. [NY Times]

    * New study determines that the United States is an oligarchy instead of a democracy. You’re telling me a government explicitly founded on the principle that only a handful of wealthy men should have a voice grew into an oligarchy? Quelle surprise!

    * Oh look, John Edwards is back. [Slate]

    * In the continuing saga of NYU’s allegedly shady spending, there are now reports that former NYU Law Dean and current NYU President John Sexton used school funds to convert two apartments into a duplex for his son. His son was married to an NYU Law employee and as I’ve said before, a school located in housing-scarce Manhattan should be able to do something to house professors, but as they say, “the optics” aren’t good. [Chronicle of Higher Education]

    * Musings on what it’s like to clerk in the midst of “flyover country” (presumably like my early childhood home of Des Moines). It makes a valiant effort to redeem itself at the end, but this article is exactly why most parts of the country think New Yorkers are elitist dicks. Which, we kind of are, but you don’t want to broadcast that. [Ramblings on Appeal]

    * The government is profiting handsomely from law students. Is that really a bad thing? [Law & Economics Prof Blog]

    * A D.C. law professor is now a movie star. [Washington City Paper]

    * The judge in the New Orleans Affordable Housing case may know the real identity of one of the anonymous commenters in the case. And if one of the anonymous trolls was a federal prosecutor poisoning the well in the case — like everyone suspects — it could aid the defense. [Times-Picayune]

    * For those of you across the pond, there’s a one-day event for lawyers on the business case for Corporate Social Responsibility. It’s in England because American companies have already passed on the idea of corporate responsibility. [International Law Society]

    1 Comment / / Apr 17, 2014 at 5:01 PM
  • 250px-Pink_peeps

    Non-Sequiturs, Rankings, Sexual Harassment, United Kingdom / Great Britain

    Non-Sequiturs: 04.15.14

    * The annual Peeps In Law contest is open! Voting is open until 11:59 p.m. on April 21. [ABA Journal]

    * A comprehensive look at the law school reputation rank component of the U.S. News rankings. Maybe Professor Illig can take heart that lawyers and judges still like Oregon better than U.S. News. [Tipping the Scales]

    * Airline tells passenger to, um, screw herself. There’s no lawsuit yet, but that’s inevitable. [New York Magazine]

    * Here are lawyers in wigs in cat selfies. The Internet is amazing. [Legal Cheek]

    * New Jersey has finally issued a memo calling for more training for its judges in response to the veritable Debtor’s Prison they’ve fostered. [Bergen Dispatch]

    * An engaged couple won the UVA Moot Court competition. Nothing says romance like researching for fake arguments. [UVA Law]

    * Remember the Jennifer Gaubert story? She was the lawyer and former radio host who accused a cab driver of sexual harassment… and then the authorities watched the cabbie’s video and decided she was totally lying. Well, now that video is available. Watch it below…. [YouTube]

    3 Comments / / Apr 15, 2014 at 5:01 PM
  • Pot Summons RF

    Caption Contests, Contests, Drugs, Marijuana, Pictures, Rank Stupidity, United Kingdom / Great Britain

    Caption Contest Winner: I Was Gonna Go To Court, But Then I Got High

    Because rolling up and smoking your court summons might land you in the joint.

    3 Comments / / Mar 12, 2014 at 2:16 PM
  • Pot Summons RF

    Caption Contests, Contests, Drugs, Marijuana, Pictures, Rank Stupidity, United Kingdom / Great Britain

    Caption Contest Finalists: I Was Gonna Go To Court, But Then I Got High

    Because rolling up and smoking your court summons might land you in the joint.

    6 Comments / / Mar 7, 2014 at 11:05 AM
  • pot smoking RF

    Caption Contests, Contests, Drugs, Marijuana, Pictures, Rank Stupidity, United Kingdom / Great Britain

    Caption Contest: I Was Gonna Go To Court, But Then I Got High

    Court documents probably make crappy rolling papers, but this kid wants to smoke his summons anyway.

    31 Comments / / Mar 5, 2014 at 3:33 PM
  • 445px-Woody_Allen_(2006)

    Harvard, Insider Trading, Law Professors, Law Schools, Legal Ethics, Non-Sequiturs, Screw-Ups, Sex, Sex Scandals, Tax Law, United Kingdom / Great Britain, Wall Street

    Non-Sequiturs: 02.10.14

    * The Woody Allen-Mia Farrow custody findings were pretty damning. But for legal geeks, the important point is footnote 1, where the opinion shouts out then-clerk, now federal judge Analisa Torres for her role in drafting the opinion. [Huffington Post]

    * Um… you shouldn’t do that with a sea anemone. [Air Force Court of Criminal Appeals]

    * Judge Stanwood Duval presided over the criminal trial of a BP engineer arising from the BP oil spill. He forgot to mention that he was a plaintiff in a suit against BP arising from the BP oil spill. Oops.[New Orleans Times-Picayune]

    * Maybe Harvard needs some new tax lawyers. [Chronicle of Higher Education]

    * Apparently, the Brits aren’t too thorough with their background checks. A lawyer got exposed for lying about having two Harvard degrees. It only took bar authorities 9 years to figure it out. [Legal Cheek]

    * Elie weighs in on the McGruff the crime dog story from last week. [ATL Redline]

    * And part of the problem with the background check may start at the law school stage — the U.K. doesn’t consider criminal convictions for fraud in the U.S. as “relevant” for future practitioners of law. One tipster wonders if Stephen Glass should try his luck outside America? [New York Times]

    * UNLV Professor Nancy Rapoport offers some mixed thoughts on the Santa Clara professor’s “Local Rules.” [Nancy Rapoport’s Blogspot]

    * Mathew Martoma’s conviction probably doesn’t mean all that much. Except to him, of course. For him it means some quality time in federal prison. [Dealbreaker]

    6 Comments / / Feb 10, 2014 at 5:03 PM
  • Juri the Dreamer by Juri H Chinchilla RF

    Intellectual Property, Music, Trademarks, United Kingdom / Great Britain

    On Remand: Apple Wedges Itself Into The Music Business

    The Beatles’ company, Apple Corps, sued Apple Computer in Britain. Who prevailed in this legal battle of the Apples?

    9 Comments / / Feb 10, 2014 at 1:40 PM
  • Note: This is not using proper, Catalyst-branded rolling papers

    Craigslist, Crime, Drugs, Election Law, Legal Ethics, Non-Sequiturs, United Kingdom / Great Britain

    Non-Sequiturs: 02.07.14

    * A lawyer who sold 2200 pounds of marijuana can’t practice in Minnesota any more. That’s a metric tonne, by the way. Jeez, now I sound like Thomas Corwin Mendenhall. [Minneapolis Star-Tribune]

    * If you can use Craigslist to commit crime, you can use it to solve crime. Awesome. Now, if you can use Craigslist to spark a race to the bottom in legal wages, can you use it to reverse that trend. No. [Legal Juice]

    * And if you think it’s tough for young lawyers to find a job here, then was a U.K. firm really asking prospective lawyers to invest money in the firm in exchange for a job? [Legal Cheek]

    * McGruff the Crime Dog wanted to take a bite out of crime… with a grenade launcher. [CBS Houston]

    * How to keep yourself productive. I’m very intrigued by this browser add-on she mentions… [Corporette]

    * This may come as a shock, but Glenn Greenwald is troubled by the Obama administration’s legal justification for killing American citizens overseas via drone. [The Guardian]

    * The Careerist’s Vivia Chen interviewed David during LegalTech. You can watch it at this link. [Law Technology News]

    * Did you see The Daily Show take on a recent trend in election law? Professor Rick Hasen did. And the video is embedded below… [Election Law Blog]

    2 Comments / / Feb 7, 2014 at 5:01 PM
  • Hereford_bull_large-RF

  • Does Biglaw have a pedigree problem?

    9th Circuit, Affirmative Action, Biglaw, Blank Rome, Gay, Job Searches, Jury Duty, Law Schools, Minority Issues, Morning Docket, Pornography, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, United Kingdom / Great Britain

    Morning Docket: 01.23.14

    * The Supreme Court isn’t sure how to address restitution in this child pornography case, but the justices agreed that they didn’t like the “50 percent fudge factor” offered by a government attorney. [New York Times]

    * No, stupid, you can’t strike a juror just because he’s gay. By expanding juror protections to sexual orientation, the Ninth Circuit recently added a new notch on the gay rights bedpost. Progress! [Los Angeles Times]

    * The Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board says the NSA’s domestic surveillance program is illegal and should be stopped. Sorry, Edward Snowden beat you to the punch on that one. [New York Times]

    * While Blank Rome was busy denying a possible merger with Nixon Peabody, it picked up 21 attorneys from two small firms in California to open a San Francisco office. Sneaky. [Philadelphia Business Journal]

    * Dennis T. O’Riordan, the ex-Paul Hastings partner who faked his credentials, was disbarred — not in New York, where he claimed he was admitted, but across the pond in the United Kingdom. [Am Law Daily]

    * The ABA Journal wants to know if your law firm considers law school pedigree during its hiring process. Please consider the law schools your firm shuts out from OCI, and respond accordingly. [ABA Journal]

    * Word on the street is UALR School of Law is trying to push an affirmative action program that’s “likely unconstitutional.” It might also be insulting to prospective minority students, so there’s that. [Daily Caller]

    11 Comments / / Jan 23, 2014 at 9:12 AM
  • DowntonAbbey1

    Benchslaps, Health Care / Medicine, Jews, Law Schools, Non-Sequiturs, Racism, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Television, United Kingdom / Great Britain

    Non-Sequiturs: 01.07.14

    * Downton Abbey has inspired a new bill making its way through the House of Lords, who apparently watched the show and figured out for the first time that women get screwed by the law of entail. Now if they can just pass a law that would keep Bates out of prison in the first place. [The Atlantic]

    * Ben Adlin reminisces about the era when the Supreme Court actually cared about oral arguments. [Summary Judgments]

    * An interesting infographic on where Superlawyers went to school. Finally a ranking where NYU can top Yale. [Online Paralegal Programs]

    * Another installment of classic ads ruined by lawyers. [Vice]

    * Fifth Circuit judges aren’t the only ones to tell their colleagues to shut up; here’s some fun news from the Philippines. [Manila Times]

    * French cities have banned performances of a comedian with a history of racking up hate speech fines. I mean, since when has anti-Semitism been a problem in Europe? [Al Jazeera]

    * If you think conservative arguments against the Affordable Care Act are dumb, check out liberal columnists arguing that Obama screwed up by not pushing for single-payer. [Lawyers, Guns & Money]

    2 Comments / / Jan 7, 2014 at 5:12 PM
  • CuckoosCallingCover

    Books, Fashion, Fast Food, Non-Sequiturs, Student Loans, United Kingdom / Great Britain

    Non-Sequiturs: 01.03.14

    * Chris Gossage, the London solicitor who spilled the beans on J.K. Rowling’s pseudonym for The Cuckoo’s Calling (affiliate link), was fined for breaking a client confidence — making him the first person in 2014 to meet his resolution and lose a significant number of pounds. [Perez Hilton]

    * How awful are student loan companies? This woman tried to discharge a student loan and was told she spent too much income dining out — referencing a $12 McDonald’s Value Meal for her and her husband. You stay klassy, loan sharks! [New York Times]

    * Border agents really have something against musical instruments. It all dates back to that one time at band camp when a flute stood them up. [Overlawyered]

    * A super-affordable tuxedo blazer! [Corporette]

    * ATMs aren’t all that secure. At least not in Brooklyn. Maybe it was opening ironically…. [Legal Juice]

    * Donald Looper, the founder of 120-lawyer Looper Reed & McGraw, has stepped away from the firm. Probably to head back in time to prevent the firm from ever existing, because that’s what good Loopers do. [ABA Journal]

    * A human rights lawyer was kidnapped in Syria and the rebel groups seem to not care even a little bit. [Al-Monitor]

    4 Comments / / Jan 3, 2014 at 4:31 PM
  • It_1990_Promotional_Poster

    Crime, Federal Judges, Law Schools, Movies, Non-Sequiturs, Privacy, Technology, United Kingdom / Great Britain, Wall Street

    Non-Sequiturs: 12.27.13

    * Judge William Pauley ruled that the NSA’s warrantless spying program is legal, noting that — if it had existed — the government could have predicted the 9/11 attacks. Good point, because intelligence agencies were in no position to figure out that there was an attack brewing without a Big Brother initiative. Oh… wait. [Huffington Post]

    * On a related note, a cartoon from 1994 that predicted the NSA’s controversial programs. It’s really kind of scary…. [Slate]

    * Britain’s clowns are furious that people are dressing up as clowns and trying to scare people. For their sake, let’s make sure they never hear about Pennywise. [Lowering the Bar]

    * Professor Dave Hoffman evaluates the case for flat-rate tuition. [Concurring Opinions]

    * The Wolf of Wall Street is about a criminal ripping off poor people. Bankers cheered at a recent showing. There is a lesson to be had there about what bankers would do if given an opportunity. [Business Insider]

    * “Knockout,” a game where young boys cold-cock unsuspecting victims, is a serious issue. Nah, just kidding, it’s a crypto-racist overreaction. But at least one kid was stupid enough to try it and then tell a cop about it. Seriously. [Gawker]

    6 Comments / / Dec 27, 2013 at 3:58 PM