William H. Bowen School of Law

Every now and again, a foreign news agency picks up a story from The Onion as fact and the world snickers behind their back. A Chinese state-run paper and a South Korean paper picked up Kim Jong Un’s election as the “Sexiest Man Alive.” The Iranians ran with an Onion story that rural whites “would rather vote for Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad than President Barack Obama.”

And everyone falls for the Daily Currant because it’s not really funny.

One law school is now prominently displaying its award as the “Most Amazing Place to Get Smart” from a local satirical newspaper…

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Law School Proudly Displays Award from Satirical Paper”

Instead of grades, maybe we should just give law students boxes of tissues? One box if you did really well, five boxes if you stink but nobody has the heart to tell you.

As we mentioned in Morning Docket, there is a law professor running around arguing that C’s should no longer be given to law students.

Because getting C’s makes law students sad. Eliminating C’s would improve the ““psychological well-being” of law students.

How do you say “how did I beat you” in Mandarin?

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “The Wussification of Legal Education Continues”

Last month, in the inaugural post in our series of Law School Success Stories, we focused on the theme of “the value of thrift.” We outlined a “low risk” approach to law school, profiling happy law school graduates who secured their law degrees without going into excessive debt — under $50K upon graduation, which is the recommendation of Professor Brian Tamanaha, author of a new book (affiliate link) about reforming legal education.

Today we’re going to cover the flip side: the “high risk, high reward” approach to legal education. In some ways this is a dangerous theme. The promise of Biglaw bucks is the siren song that leads many to crash on the rocks of joblessness and crippling debt (as Will Meyerhofer discussed earlier today).

Some law schools clearly exaggerate the ability of a legal education to increase a person’s career prospects and earning potential. But for some subset of law students, however small, law school does turn out to be a golden ticket. Their numbers might be inflated, but they do exist. Law school has allowed these individuals to increase their incomes dramatically. And — shocker! — many of these J.D. holders actually enjoy their lucrative new jobs.

Read about a young woman who went from being a secretary to having a secretary — along with a six-figure paycheck. Meet a young man with a rather unmarketable undergraduate degree who now, thanks to law school, makes bank in New York City.

Here’s another way of describing today’s success stories: “Fairy tales can come true, it can happen to you….”

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Law School Success Stories: High Risk, High Reward”