Technology

On October 8th, .LAWYER and .ATTORNEY domain names will be made available to the general public.

This means that domain names like www.JohnSmith.lawyer, www.Litigation.attorney and www.IP.laywer will be offered for the very first time at http://momentumnames.com.

In response to a number of questions regarding this process, we have put together the following information…

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “8 Critical Questions Answered About The New .LAWYER And .ATTORNEY Domain Names”

Ed note: This post originally appeared on Global Regulatory Enforcement Law Blog.

Unmanned aerial cameras have been legal in other parts of the world but prohibited for commercial use in the United States until last week, with the limited exception of two commercial-drone operations, which the FAA had previously approved for Alaskan oil operations. On September 25, 2014, the FAA announced that it approved certain uses of drones or unmanned aircraft systems (“UAS”) in the National Airspace System for film and TV productions. This is a breakthrough for the entertainment industry because drones allow filmmakers Superman-like abilities to take images at angles never before captured. Drones are able to cover altitudes lower than helicopters but higher than cranes, and can navigate indoor areas that are otherwise difficult or impossible to get to. However, the FAA’s approval is not without restriction.

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “It’s a Bird…it’s a Plane…it’s a Drone; FAA Approves Limited Use of Drones as Camera Platforms for Film and TV Production”


I miss the old days
I’d scare natives with eclipse!
Now? [Shrug] check Twitter

The bad news: we took away the “easy” button in eDiscovery. The good news: see “the bad news”

Having reviewed a bit of the story of eDiscovery, it may be time to reveal another insider secret: eDiscovery used to be easy. Why? Because we were all good at it? Nope—not at all; it was easy for the exact opposite reason. No one had the slightest idea what they were doing, and so the bar for being an eDiscovery expert was pretty darned low. There were no applicable rules for using electronic information in evidence or requesting ESI in discovery. There were very few cases, reported or otherwise. Most importantly, almost no one had an inkling that stuff on peoples’ computers could be actually useful for lawsuits. Why even worry about it?

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “The Natives Are Unimpressed”


keyboard typing

“Cyber liability insurance” is often used to describe a range of insurance policies, in the same way that the word cyber is used to describe a broad range of information security related tools, processes and services. Everyone is talking about the need for “stand alone” cyber liability insurance policies. These stand-alone cyber liability insurance policies basically cover expenses related to the management of a breach, e.g, the investigation, remediation, notification and credit checking. However, cyber liability coverage is also found in some existing insurance policies, including kidnap and ransom and professional liability coverage. There may also be some limited coverage through a crime policy if electronic theft is added to that policy.

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Cyber Liability Insurance: Where’s the Beef?”

Gavel with American Flag

On September 18, 2014, InsideCounsel magazine held a corporate counsel conference to facilitate discussions on current legal issues. In sessions on governance and compliance, industry experts addressed the current top challenges that in-house attorneys face when managing enterprise risk.

Cybersecurity is no longer just a “technology” issue. It has become a business and legal issue. Compliance and management personnel must be trained and informed on the impact that cybersecurity risks present to the business. Companies must have a business response, not just a technical response, prepared for when something goes wrong. The question is not “whether” a cybersecurity issue will arise, but when.

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Top Five Governance & Compliance Hot Topics For General Counsel”

I had been planning to write an article on whether law firms should upgrade to Windows 8. That is, until last week, when Microsoft previewed their next operating system, Windows 10.

Not only did they announce it, they opened it up for a free preview version download. So I downloaded it, tested it, and took screenshots for you so I can walk through the pros and cons of upgrading to a new operating system.

The Windows 10 preview makes you go through a series of warnings where you acknowledge that you are going to be using an unstable, incomplete, buggy operating system. They do not recommend it for your main computer, just if you have an old laptop lying around.

So, Here’s Windows 10:

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Should You Upgrade To Windows 10 (Or 8)? A Pictorial Walkthrough”

Ed note: This post originally appeared on Peter S. Vogel’s Internet, Information Technology & e-Discovery Blog.

A recent administrative order was issued for Google to “to take the necessary technical and organisational measures to guarantee that their users can decide on their own if and to what extend their data is used for profiling.” Last week the Hamburg Commissioner of Data Protection and Freedom of Information (HmbBfDI) ordered that Google is “compelled to collect and combine user data only in accordance with the existing legal framework.”

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Privacy Policy Challenge: Google Ordered to Cease Data Profiling in Germany”

Ed note: This is the latest installment in a series of posts from the ATL Career Center’s team of expert contributors. Today, Rob Jordan explores how good use of technology can help busy lawyers process large amounts of information.

To have a better legal career, attorneys — including those who are uncertain about their future prospectsneed to focus on more than just lawyering and have an eye towards networking and business development. Networking and business development, unfortunately, require a lot of hard work and time. So, efficiency matters. Optimize your time and you’ll have bonus minutes to spend fortifying your career.

Previously, I suggested a number of easy, low-maintenance media outlets that could help lawyers (and bankers) be informed and “interesting” and, by extension, be better networkers. Having access to relevant information is one thing, but creating a system for efficiently processing the mass quantities of information currently available to you is just as critical. It’s also necessary to avoid feeling inundated and overwhelmed. Here is my simple system for streamlining information – all through the use of mobile – in a manner that keeps me organized and informed without triggering the Problem of Choice.

Continue reading at the ATL Career Center…

This would be a better patent than what these guys received.

Blue Spike LLC is a patent litigation factory. At one point, it filed over 45 cases in two weeks. It has sued a who’s who of technology companies, ranging from giants to startups, Adobe to Zeitera. Blue Spike claims not to be a troll, but any legitimate business it has pales in comparison to its patent litigation. It says it owns a “revolutionary technology” it refers to as “signal abstracting.” On close inspection, however, its patents turn out to be nothing more than a nebulous wish list. Blue Spike’s massive litigation campaign is a perfect example of how vague and abstract software patents tax innovation.

The basic idea behind Blue Spike’s patents is creating a digital fingerprint (which the patents refer to as an “abstract”) of a file that allows it to be compared to other files (e.g. comparing audio files to see if they are the same song). In very general terms, the patents describe creating a “reference generator,” an “object locator,” a “feature selector,” a “comparing device,” and a “recorder.” You will be amazed to learn that these five elements “may be implemented with software.” That task, however, is left for the reader….

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Serial Litigant Blue Spike Wins EFF’s Stupid Patent Of The Month For September”

Gavel

On September 17, the U.S. Tax Court, in Dynamo Holdings LP v. Commissioner, 143 T.C. No. 9 (Sept. 17, 2014), held that a taxpayer could use predictive coding, over the objection of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), to identify relevant electronically stored information (ESI) for production. This is the first Tax Court case to address the use of predictive coding in response to a discovery request.

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Legal Alert: The Tax Court Approves the Use of Predictive Coding”

Page 3 of 1171234567...117