Patents

  • Cheating-Spouse

    Attorney Misconduct, Biglaw, Books, Career Alternatives, Disasters / Emergencies, Gay, Gay Marriage, House Judiciary Committee, Law Firm Mergers, Law School Deans, Law Schools, Legal Ethics, Morning Docket, Patents, Sandra Day O'Connor, SCOTUS, Sex, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 10.30.13

    * Justice Sandra Day O’Connor has joined Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in being one of the only justices to perform a same-sex marriage. No divas here: the wedding ceremony was held at the high court because “[t]hat’s where she was.” [BuzzFeed]

    * “Proceed with caution.” David Kappos, the former director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, isn’t too keen on the latest patent reform bill that’s currently before the House Judiciary Committee. If only the man still had a say. [National Law Journal]

    * Dentons and McKenna Long & Aldridge have released a joint statement to ensure the public that the proposed merger is still on. Good news, everyone! The firm won’t be named McDentons. [Am Law Daily]

    * Ralph Lerner, formerly of Sidley Austin, has been slapped on the wrist suspended from practice in New York for one year’s time after improperly billing car service to clients to the tune of $50,000. [Am Law Daily]

    * It’s been a year since Superstorm Sandy, and lawyers are still counseling their clients on how to muddle through the mess. Volunteer some pro bono hours and help out those in need. [New York Law Journal]

    * After threatening to cut faculty positions, New England Law Dean John O’Brien is taking a 25 percent pay cut. He’ll only earn $650,000. Wow. I think we’re supposed to be impressed. [Boston Business Journal]

    * Career alternatives for attorneys: rescuer of nerd relics. Head to this Brooklyn book store (of course it’s in Brooklyn) if you’re desperately seeking long lost science fiction tales. [Wall Street Journal (sub. req.)]

    * We bet that folks in Australia would like to tell the the High Court to bugger off after overturning this ruling. Sexual injuries that occur during work-related trips don’t qualify for workers’ compensation. [Bloomberg]

    0 Comments / / Oct 30, 2013 at 9:33 AM
  • internet troll

    Banking Law, Drugs, Environment / Environmental Law, Law Schools, Marijuana, Morning Docket, Patents, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 10.24.13

    * Parties in the greenhouse gas cases before SCOTUS have agreed to trim the number and length of their briefs to reduce the number of times “go f@ck yourself and die” is written. [Blog of Legal Times]

    * The latest patent reform bill up for debate promises that it will put an end to the trolls by forcing them to do more work before filing suit. If only it were that easy to keep the trolls at bay. [National Law Journal]

    * Do the hustle, and blame it on Becca! A jury has found that Bank of America is liable for selling defective mortgages, and the potential penalty could be up to $848 million. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * Since the law was puff, puff, passed, lawyers in Washington State have politely asked their Supreme Court if and when they’ll allowed to smoke weed and represent clients that sell it. [Corporate Counsel]

    * Class certification in the Alaburda v. TJSL lawsuit over allegedly deceptive employment statistics has officially been denied. We guess that all good things must come to an anticlimactic end. [ABA Journal]

    * Another law school gets it: the U. of St. Thomas will its freeze tuition at the low, low price of $36,843, allowing students to pay a flat fee for all three years of education. [Campus Confidential / Star Tribune]

    * If you’d like to ace your law school interviews (which apparently are a thing these days), it helps if your personality doesn’t inspire ritualistic seppuku. [Law Admissions Lowdown / U.S. News & World Report]

    * Michael Skakel, the Kennedy cousin convicted of killing, was granted a new trial due to ineffective assistance of counsel. Getting away with murder? Aww, welcome to the family, Mike! [Washington Post]

    3 Comments / / Oct 24, 2013 at 9:09 AM
  • It's always sunny - or raining money? - in Philadelphia.

    Affirmative Action, Biglaw, Intellectual Property, Law Schools, Money, Morning Docket, Patents, Rankings, Real Estate, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 10.15.13

    * Affirmative action is again being put to the test before the Supreme Court, but this time, we’re not so sure the justices will punt the ball like last time. The countdown to one of Elie’s epic rants on race in America starts in 3, 2, 1… [National Law Journal]

    * The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office is open for business, but the government shutdown has pretty much brought work at both the International Trade Commission and the Federal Trade Commission to a complete standstill. May they live to fight patent trolls another day. [Corporate Counsel]

    * Good news, everyone! Many Biglaw firms have changed the way they make their real estate and office space decisions, primarily because “maintaining profitability has become very challenging.” [GlobeSt.com]

    * Here’s another list of the law schools where you can get the most bang for your buck — except it neglects to mention what percentage of the class responded to these salary questions. Oops! [PolicyMic]

    * Just saying, but if you’re applying to a law school on an early decision basis, it’s helpful if you actually want to go to that law school above all others. [Law Admissions Lowdown / U.S. News & World Report]

    4 Comments / / Oct 15, 2013 at 9:17 AM
  • iStock_000016927465XSmall-RF

    Drinking, Intellectual Property, Non-Sequiturs, Patents, State Judges, State Judges Are Clowns, Tax Law

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.03.13

    * The author of Great Response to a Cease & Desist Letter fame sent the ATL office some glitter pens because Staci asked for one in the comments. Keep being awesome Andrew Delaney! [Twitter]

    * Tired of the National Zoo Panda Cam? A USPTO attorney has created the Substitute Panda Cam. I wonder if the cam will survive the shutdown. [Substitute Panda Cam]

    * Well, wonder no more! Here’s a rundown of how the shutdown is treating the intellectual property world. [Patently-O]

    * So if you’re part of the intellectual property legal regime that’s shut down (or any government employee off because of the shutdown), here’s a list of all the drinking specials in D.C. you can use to fill your day. [Washington Post]

    * An update on Bike Dude. [Racked]

    * Some advice on handling terrible clients. Alternate title: 50 Shades of Grey. [The Careerist]

    * St. Charles Parish Judge Michele Morel has finally agreed to recuse herself in a trial over the rape of a 10-year-old girl. And why should she have recuse herself? Just because she has a personal relationship with the defendant’s family? Pshaw! [Times-Picayune]

    * Happy 100th birthday to income tax! Back then, someone with around $12 million (in 2013 dollars) paid about 7 percent in taxes. Meanwhile, today that same person would pay… well, with deductions and carried interest exceptions, probably about 7 percent. [TaxProf Blog]

    0 Comments / / Oct 3, 2013 at 5:00 PM
  • NCAA Football 14 USE

    Biglaw, Billable Hours, Health Care / Medicine, Job Searches, Law Firm Mergers, Law Schools, Michael Jackson, Money, Morning Docket, Patents, Sports, Technology, Trials

    Morning Docket: 10.03.13

    * According to Altman Weil, law firm merger mania is on pace for record highs as firms desperately attempt to stave off financial problems by gobbling up smaller firms’ clients. [Am Law Daily]

    * The NCAA better watch its back: Jeffrey Kessler, the Winston & Strawn partner who helped bring free agency to the NFL, wants in on the potential case for unpaid college athletes. [Bloomberg]

    * Lawyers doing regulatory work are very afraid that the shutdown will decimate their fourth quarter billables because “[t]he longer it goes, the more problematic it will be.” Yay government. [Reuters]

    * GrayRobinson partner Philippe Devé is in need of a bone marrow transplant, and his firm is using its social media presence to crowdsource a donor. Will you lend a helping hand? [Daily Business Review]

    * UpCounsel has successfully raised $1.5 million in funding to beef up its international patent practice, proving the point that it costs a pretty penny to protect clients from the world’s patent trolls. [TechCrunch]

    * Law schools in New York State are feeling the pain of the drop in applications, and some are now willing admit that their graduates had to start “cannibalizing each other” in the job market. [New York Law Journal]

    * But really, so what if applications are down? Lots of law schools consider themselves lucky to be keeping the lights on with the assistance of generous alumni donations in the millions. [National Law Journal]

    * Another day, another “diploma mill.” Sorry to disappoint you, law students and alumni, but Charleston School of Law is moving forward with its plans to sell out to the InfiLaw System. [Post and Courier]

    * Who’s bad? Not AEG Live. A jury made up of people unable to answer yes or no questions during the reading of the verdict found that the concert promoter wasn’t liable in Michael Jackson’s death. [CNN]

    0 Comments / / Oct 3, 2013 at 9:03 AM
  • Scene_at_the_Signing_of_the_Constitution_of_the_United_States

    Hearsay, International Law, Non-Sequiturs, Patents, SCOTUS, State Judges, State Judges Are Clowns, Supreme Court

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.02.13

    * This Term, both wings of the Court will be making originalist arguments because “slaveholders from 200 years ago said so” is the most compelling argument in our legal toolbox. [Constitutional Accountability Center]

    * Yale Law grad Ronan Farrow, supposedly Woody Allen’s son, might really be Frank Sinatra’s son. Looking at him that… makes sense. [Vanity Fair]

    * Looks like the FTC is finally going after patent trolls. Or would be if we still had a government. [Ars Technica]

    * Based on the look and address, the Law Librarians blog appears to have left the Law Professor Blogs Network. It must have been too loud in there for the librarians. [Law Librarians]

    * So… you’re saying lots of trial judges out there don’t understand hearsay? [The Legal Watchdog]

    * Avast! Russia is going after Greenpeace (probably illegally) for piracy. [The Volokh Conspiracy]

    * A reminder that the federal government shut down is the result of state laws, so maybe you should vote in those off-year local elections. [PrawfsBlawg]

    7 Comments / / Oct 2, 2013 at 5:02 PM
  • Baker Botts: serving up severance?

    Biglaw, Intellectual Property, Lateral Moves, Litigators, Musical Chairs, Partner Issues, Patents, Secretaries / Administrative Assistants, Staff Layoffs, Texas

    What’s Cooking At Baker Botts?

    There’s good news and bad news: a new lateral partner, and layoffs of some staff.

    6 Comments / / Sep 26, 2013 at 4:18 PM
  • Decline

    Advertising, Biglaw, Intellectual Property, Lateral Moves, Litigators, Partner Issues, Patents, Shameless Plugs, This Is an Ad

    The State of the Lateral Lawyer Market

    How robust is the market for lateral lawyers right now?

    / Sep 19, 2013 at 2:36 PM
  • dbi

    Associate Advice, Jon Stewart, Movies, Non-Sequiturs, Patents, Prisons, Privacy, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    Non-Sequiturs: 09.17.13

    * Overrated: Government surveillance is out of control. Underrated: Government spending massive amounts of money making the Army’s Intelligence and Security Command look like the set of Star Trek: The Next Generation is out of control. [Lowering the Bar]

    * Helen Wan explains “The 5 Rules Every New Associate Must Know.” Not included: learning all the technical details required to convincingly say your smartphone failed to get that 1 a.m. message. [The Careerist]

    * Another post in the fascinating series about creating visual maps of Supreme Court doctrine. It’s like a nerdier version of the The Atlas of Middle-Earth(affiliate link). [PrawfsBlawg]

    * Ilya Somin reviews the Supreme Court’s most recent Takings Clause jurisprudence. It’s a lot harder for the government to take your property away. But don’t worry, it’s still really easy to lose all your property to unregulated markets. [The Volokh Conspiracy]

    * The Office of the Solicitor General may have inadvertently helped out Frederick Oberlander and Richard Lerner, the two lawyers charged with criminal contempt for talking about a cooperator’s sentence (if you can call a $25,000 fine for admitting to a $40 million fraud a “sentence”) that the feds claim was sealed. [Wise Law NY]

    * A somewhat sad art show based on requests from prisoners in solitary. Some beautiful stuff here. Though I’d have expected more “Rita Hayworth” photo requests. [Gawker]

    * The Daily Show takes on biotech patents. Video after the jump…

    1 Comment / / Sep 17, 2013 at 5:03 PM
  • happy young lawyers RF

    Biglaw, Intellectual Property, Job Searches, Partner Issues, Patents

    A Biglaw Innovation, Or Department Of Disappointment?

    What do you think about the development of Biglaw positions like “department attorneys”?

    11 Comments / / Sep 17, 2013 at 10:16 AM
  • 'Dear Sir or Madam, you are infringing on my patent, now pay up!'

    Intellectual Property, Patents, Politics, Quote of the Day

    What If We Call Them ‘Patent Princesses’ Instead?

    Is being a “patent troll” just in the eye of the beholder?

    27 Comments / / Sep 13, 2013 at 3:32 PM
  • Twitter small

    Antitrust, Biglaw, Books, Deaths, Divorce Train Wrecks, Douglas Ginsburg, Fenwick & West, Free Speech, Intellectual Property, Law Professors, Law Schools, Media and Journalism, Morning Docket, Partner Issues, Patents, SCOTUS, Suicide, Supreme Court, Technology, Theater

    Morning Docket: 09.13.13

    * Congrats to @FenwickWest on landing the big Twitter IPO! #yaylegalfees [American Lawyer]

    * The Deal Professor, Steven Davidoff, surveys the legal landscape around the Twitter filing, focusing on the #JOBSAct. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * Jamie McCourt, a former family law attorney, strikes out in trying to set aside her divorce settlement with Frank McCourt, former owner of the Los Angeles Dodgers. She’s stuck with $131 million and several luxury homes. #richpeopleproblems [National Law Journal (sub. req.)]

    * An inquest reveals that a Hogan Lovells partner who took his own life had warned a colleague that he was going to kill himself the day before his death. [Daily Mail via ABA Journal]

    * Good news for the news business: the Senate Judiciary Committee approves a federal media-shield bill. [Washington Wire / Wall Street Journal]

    * Nathan Myhrvold, the CEO of a patent holding company, warns that anti-patent-troll sentiment could have unforeseen consequences. [Corporate Counsel]

    * Praise in the WSJ for Unprecedented: The Constitutional Challenge to Obamacare (affiliate link), the new book by Professor Josh Blackman (who recently wrote a guest post for us on Supreme Court beauty contests). [Wall Street Journal (sub. req.)]

    * Congrats to George Mason Law on its two high-profile hires: D.C. Circuit Judge Douglas Ginsburg and Covington antitrust partner Damien Geradin. [The BLT: The Blog of Legal Times]

    * If you’re in New York this weekend, go see Arguendo. Or buy tickets for the 7 p.m. performance on September 22, when I’ll be doing a talkback with artistic director John Collins after the show. Enter the discount code “ABOVE” for $35 tickets (a special rate for ATL readers). [Public Theater]

    3 Comments / / Sep 13, 2013 at 9:17 AM
  • SchillingNew

    Baseball, Constitutional Law, Federal Circuit, Google / Search Engines, Movies, Non-Sequiturs, Patents, Richard Posner, Securities and Exchange Commission, Technology, Television, Women's Issues

    Non-Sequiturs: 09.12.13

    * The hits keep on coming for Curt Schilling. Now the SEC has woken up and decided to probe the $75 million he secured from the state of Rhode Island (already the subject of another suit). Maybe he can fake another bloody sock to generate some sympathy. [Bloomberg]

    * Apple sold a “Season Pass” to Breaking Bad Season 5 and then refused to honor the second half of the season to its subscribers, prompting an Ohio doctor to file suit for $20, with hopes of building a class action. Look, Apple needed that money; Tim Cook is desperate these days. [Deadline: Hollywood]

    * Speaking of Apple, the Federal Circuit looks like it’s going to give Apple another crack at its claim that Google ripped off the iPhone patents, citing “significant” errors on the part of the last judge to rule on the dispute: Richard Posner. You come at the king, you best not miss. [Wall Street Journal]

    * And last, but definitely not least, Apple’s new fingerprint ID will be the death of the Fifth Amendment. Discuss. [Wired]

    * A film chock-full of unsanctioned footage and insulting knocks on Disney has been picked up for distribution. This is your official warning that it’s time to prepare the beauty pageant pitch for the Disney execs. [Grantland]

    * Elie smash, Charlotte Law School. [NPR Charlotte]

    * The International Association of Young Lawyers conference will feature a speed dating session (on page 6). Really hard-hitting program there. [International Association of Young Lawyers]

    * Congratulations to the 49 firms honored for meeting all of WILEF’s criteria for Gold Standard certification at today’s awards gala! [Women in Law Empowerment Forum]

    20 Comments / / Sep 12, 2013 at 5:01 PM
  • 'Dear Sir or Madam, you are infringing on my patent, now pay up!'

    Biglaw, Boutique Law Firms, Intellectual Property, Litigators, Money, Partner Issues, Partner Profits, Patents, Small Law Firms, Technology

    Has This Top IP Litigator Lost His Powers?

    A leading intellectual-property litigator finds that switching to plaintiff-side work isn’t easy.

    10 Comments / / Aug 27, 2013 at 5:35 PM
  • 125px-Naked_Juice_Peach_Front

    Guns / Firearms, Intellectual Property, Non-Sequiturs, Patents, Securities and Exchange Commission, Shinyung Oh

    Non-Sequiturs: 08.08.13

    * PepsiCo can no longer label its Naked juices as “natural” because the only place you can find more unnatural substances in something naked is in a Vivid Video production. [New York Daily News]

    * The New Yorker shines a light on the world of civil asset forfeiture. In honor of Shark Week, the article should have spent a lot more time on the United States v. Approximately 64,695 Pounds of Shark Fins case. [The New Yorker]

    * Thomas J. Kim, the Chief Counsel and Associate Director of the Securities and Exchange Commission’s Division of Corporation Finance since 2007, is going to be a partner at Sidley Austin. Don’t let the revolving door hit you on the way out! [Bloomberg Businessweek]

    * Whatever happened to Shinyung Oh, author of the incendiary Paul Hastings departure memo? An update. [Capricious Bubbles]

    * 10 reasons lawyers say the prosecutors botched the George Zimmerman trial. [AlterNet]

    * As we predicted, the four patent litigation partners leaving Finnegan, as well as six other IP lawyers, are joining Winston & Strawn. [Winston & Strawn]

    * How do you react when colleagues endorse you on LinkedIn for skills you don’t practice? Take a look…

    5 Comments / / Aug 8, 2013 at 5:01 PM
  • It's always sunny - or raining money? - in Philadelphia.

    Books, Copyright, Intellectual Property, John Marshall Law School, Jury Duty, Law School Deans, Law Schools, Non-Sequiturs, Patents, State Attorneys General

    Non-Sequiturs: 08.05.13

    * “Our graduates have a history of going to small firms, DAs and public defenders’ offices. We don’t have the employment swings that big law schools have because their graduates are focused on more elite firms,” says the dean of law school that costs $185,214 to attend. Certainly all of those students at the District Attorney’s office are making enough bank to pay that off. [Daily Report]

    * Looking to avoid jury duty? Practice some F-Bombs. [Lowering the Bar]

    * Copyright carries with it a substantial weakness — most publishers would rather reprint public domain works than deal with authors. [The Atlantic]

    * 75 percent of IP counsel are either litigating with patent trolls or expect to in the next 12 months. The other 25 percent just represent really sh**ty products. [Consero]

    * A former attorney is aiming to crowdfund her invention, a 3-in-1 kitchen tool. [Gambas and Grits]

    * Several State Attorneys General want to make it easier to go after bloggers because narrowly tailored laws are for suckers. [Popehat]

    * A tipster sent us this from Facebook. This is the best tattoo of Lady Justice ever. Picture after the jump…

    By the way, if you have pics of other great legally-themed tats, send them to us and we’ll see about crafting a full mash-up post.

    4 Comments / / Aug 5, 2013 at 5:02 PM
  • 220px-Anthonyweiner

    6th Circuit, Eliot Spitzer, ERISA, Non-Sequiturs, Patents, Survivor, Technology

    Non-Sequiturs: 07.30.13

    * For everyone at the midway point of a bar exam: Here… [Dinmoney]

    * Naked selfies: Not just for Carlos Danger anymore. A female police officer uses her workday to post naked pictures of herself. [Legal Juice]

    * Speaking of NYC politics and placing Weiners where they don’t belong, Professor Lawrence Cunningham argues that Eliot Spitzer would be a horrible Comptroller based on his record as New York Attorney General. Cunningham then lists every reason Eliot Spitzer was an awesome Attorney General. [Concurring Opinions]

    * An appeals court has upheld the ruling that killed Mayor Bloomberg’s large sugary soda ban. Drink up, fatasses! It’s your right as an American. In the meantime, check out this argument over whether the decision contains a curious paradox [PrawfsBlawg]

    * The Sixth Circuit affirmed an earlier decision dismissing a suit brought by Cooley grads. But they did not repeat the classic, “an ordinary prudent person would not have relied on [Cooley’s] statistics to decide to spend $100,000 or more.” [ABA Journal]

    * After winning Survivor, Cochran has decided to turn his law degree into the most expensive TV screenwriting degree ever. He’ll be penning a sitcom this Fall. [St. Louis Today]

    * Susan Westerberg Prager, the incoming dean of Southwestern Law School, is the first female dean of a law school… again. [Chronicle of Higher Education]

    * One doctor. Four different signatures “under penalty of perjury.” I think we’re underestimating the evil quadruplet theory. [New York Personal Injury Attorney Blog]

    * As someone without kids, I find this fascinating. Popehat has a poll asking readers their thoughts on monitoring the electronic communication of their middle schoolers. As a parent, are you more Edward Snowden or J. Edgar Hoover? [Popehat]

    1 Comment / / Jul 30, 2013 at 5:29 PM
  • Finnegan Henderson RF Finnegan Henderson Farabow Garrett  Dunner LLP