Not shown: the empty bottle of Jack in this guy's carrel.

Last week, I derisively noted that legal blogs were pushing a silly story in U.S. News about great careers that you can pursue with a law degree. No matter how bad legal hiring gets, law schools like pushing the “you can do anything with a law degree” angle, based on the anecdotal evidence of those who were lucky enough to parlay their J.D. degrees into something non-legal.

Obviously, I’ve got some anecdotes of my own.

But here’s a job, a real live job, that’s actually being offered to law students as we speak (or type). If you really want to know “what you can do with a law degree,” take a freaking look….

This job was being pitched by the BYU Law career services office. Note how the header claims that the company is looking for 1Ls, 2Ls, or 3Ls.

For the uninitiated, this means that you’ll probably spend a lot of time behind a bank teller window. Or on the phone, trying to sell crap to people who don’t want it.

Here’s a little tip: whenever you hear things like, “Most importantly, you will be part of a great team that has a lot of fun at work,” you should run. Do not pass Go, do not collect two hundred dollars. Because that’s code for: “things like job satisfaction and pay are not most important here.” Fun work environments tend to involve a lot of “flair,” Wednesday afternoon taco parties, and very little in terms of compensation, bonuses, or employee flexibility. And that’s not even getting into the fact that people who actually enjoy selling crap to people who don’t need it are some of the worst specimens of humanity.

Besides, you went to law school, so you’re not expecting work to be “fun.” You’re expecting work to be meaningful and lucrative; you’ll take your fun on the weekends.

Of course, while this job is being offered to BYU Law students, we’re not exactly talking about a “J.D. required” position:

Way to go, BYU. Way to highlight the significant overlap between “things you can do with a law degree” and “things you can do after failing out of high school and getting your GED.”

Earlier: What ‘Can’t’ You Do With a Law Degree?


comments sponsored by

34 comments (hidden for your protection) Show all comments