Books

  • J._K._Rowling_2010

    9th Circuit, Attorney Misconduct, Bankruptcy, Books, Football, Law Schools, Legal Ethics, Non-Sequiturs, Student Loans, United Kingdom / Great Britain

    Non-Sequiturs: 07.18.13

    * J.K. Rowling’s outing as The Cuckoo’s Calling (affiliate link) author Robert Galbraith has rendered print copies of the book scarce and a hot collector’s item. Now Rowling is hurling Cruciatus curses at her lawyers as the source of the revelation. [The Guardian]

    * The New York Times weighs in on the worth of a law degree debate and makes Elie’s day by labeling him “indomitable.” [DealBook / New York Times]

    * After the Ninth Circuit struck a tone of sanity, federal bankruptcy judges in Michigan and Tennessee remind us that law school debt is forever. [The National Law Journal]

    * The hottest barristers in London. Meh. Holding out for the hottest solicitors countdown. [Legal Cheek]

    * A lawyer should get suspended for smuggling stuff out of prison for a client. But shouldn’t the punishment be a tad more severe for smuggling a HIT LIST out of prison for a client? [Mercury News]

    * The Ten Competencies that law schools should teach. I’d add “understanding how to order from Seamless at 4AM,” but otherwise it’s a solid list. [Associate's Mind]

    * Penn State has approved a $60 million settlement in the Sandusky cases. Which is less than the football program makes in a year. [Deadspin]

    * Apparently, the laws and other conditions surrounding America’s oil industry make it only the fifth friendliest place to extract petroleum in the world. Thanks a bunch you granola-eating socialists. [Breaking Energy]

    * It’s not over yet, but the current projection for law school applicants this year is 59,200. My response to those fresh young go-getters after the jump…

    12 Comments / / Jul 18, 2013 at 5:03 PM
  • RobRomanoff_smile-color-2012-300x420-RF

    Ask the Experts, Books, Partner Issues

    The ATL Interrogatories: 10 Questions with Rob Romanoff from Levenfeld Pearlstein

    Rob Romanoff of Levenfeld Pearlstein answers 10 questions for The ATL Interrogatories.

    0 Comments / / Jul 17, 2013 at 11:43 AM
  • Newly built modern court jury box with wooden decor.

    Books, Guns / Firearms, Jury Duty, Trials

    The Rise and Fall of Juror B37 and How Verdicts Are Made

    Juror B37 has had a crazy couple of days, and her story tells us a lot about how juries behave.

    88 Comments / / Jul 16, 2013 at 12:34 PM
  • sy-map

    Book Deals, Books, Defamation, General Counsel, Health Care / Medicine, In-House Counsel, Labor / Employment, Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 07.15.13

    * The role of lawyers in America’s Syrian policy. Everyone always tries to throw the lawyers under the bus. [Lawfare]

    * Pippa Middleton has some lawyers trying to crack down on a parody Twitter account. Thankfully, the law exists to protect wealthy socialites from being mocked. [IT-Lex]

    * GCs are not happy with the rates charged by outside counsel. I, for one, am shocked that GCs don’t like paying upwards of $1000/hour for “further work.” [Consero]

    * Honestly, we should have seen this coming: a Zimmerman juror already signed a book deal. This is the juror who assumed black people had rioted over the shooting and called Trayvon a “boy of color,” so you can tell the prosecution was doing a bang-up job with its jury selection procedures. [AlterNet]

    * Conservatives rejoice after several unions complain about Obamacare. Oh, the irony! Except the unions’ complaint is not that Obamacare is bad, but that it doesn’t go far enough in providing incentives to non-profit insurance plans and penalizing companies that are cutting back on hours to avoid the law. [The Volokh Conspiracy]

    * The Top 50 Legal Innovators, Techies, Visionaries, and Leaders. And we at ATL were snubbed again. [FastCase via TaxProf Blog]

    * After the jump, a short video about . I understand that people are miffed that the most recent film version of Superman takes a laissez-faire view of saving lives, but Superman’s always been a dick…

    3 Comments / / Jul 15, 2013 at 5:03 PM
  • Ruth bader Ginsburg young

    Biglaw, Books, Husch Blackwell, Insider Trading, Job Searches, Law Firm Mergers, Law Schools, Non-Sequiturs, Politics, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Texas, Women's Issues

    Non-Sequiturs: 06.19.13

    * I’ll get into this more tomorrow (unless Fisher drops), but Washington & Lee’s third year “experiential learning” program has met with underwhelming results in terms of job placement. Theories abound as to why, but this is basically why I say (a) the third year is useless, and (b) stop telling me what your law professors can do, and start telling me what your career services officers are doing. [Tax Prof Blog]

    * I guess they didn’t like the way they looked. [Yahoo Finance]

    * Hey, it’s another article beating up on Don Verrilli. I’m going to be really happy for him when he leaves, makes a ton of money, and sticks it all in his ears. [Forbes]

    * An insider trading loophole big enough to drive a material non-public truck through it. [Dealbreaker]

    * Husch Blackwell gets bigger in Texas. [Kansas City Star]

    * Roy Cho, the Kirkland & Ellis associate currently running for Congress, gets a coveted endorsement — from the Wu-Tang Clan! [NJ.com]

    * A nice review for Marcia Coyle’s new book, The Roberts Court (affiliate link). It’ll be fun to see how the Court looks at this moment in time, before what will surely be viewed as legacy-defining decisions on race and gay rights coming any minute now. [Seattle Times]

    * Justice Ginsburg is optimistic about the future of women on the court. She’s also optimistic about the future of skeletons on the court, and she’s super-excited about the possibility of downloading her brain into a robotic body so that she can keep her job forever. [Blog of the Legal Times]

    1 Comment / / Jun 19, 2013 at 5:41 PM
  • Lauren Giddings

    Biglaw, Books, Clarence Thomas, Deaths, Google / Search Engines, Immigration, Labor / Employment, Morning Docket, Murder, Partner Issues, Partner Profits, Pro Bono, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 06.19.13

    * You think you know Justice Clarence Thomas, but you have no idea. Here are several myths about the silent Supreme Court star that he was capable of busting in just this term alone. [WSJ Law Blog (sub. req.)]

    * According to the CBO, the immigration reform bill being considered in the Senate would allow eight million immigrants to gain legal status and lower the deficit by billions. But alas, dey still terk er jerbs! [NPR]

    * Google is doing its best to try not to be evil by asking the FISA court to ease up on gag orders preventing the internet giant from telling the world about what it’s required to give to the government. [Washington Post]

    * Florida firm Becker & Poliakoff will withhold 20% of equity partners’ pay, a move that made some lawyers cry. The firm is apparently planning to save the cash for a rainy day. [Daily Business Review]

    * Paul Mannina, an attorney with the Labor Department charged with sexually assaulting a coworker, was found in his cell with his throat slashed. Police are investigating the death. [Washington Post]

    * FYI, your aspirational pro bono hours — or complete and utter lack thereof — will now be public record in New York, and you must report them on your biannual registration forms. [New York Law Journal]

    * Coming soon to a law school near you: really old books from the 13th century that’ll probably turn into dust if you dare try to read them. You can find this nerdgasm over at Yale Law. [National Law Journal]

    * The family of Lauren Giddings, the slain Mercer Law graduate, has filed a $5 million wrongful death suit in federal court against accused killer Stephen McDaniel in the hopes of finding her remains. [Telegraph]

    5 Comments / / Jun 19, 2013 at 9:07 AM
  • 220px-Theseus_Slaying_Minotaur_by_Barye

    Biglaw, Books, Conferences / Symposia, Food, Law Schools, Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 06.17.13

    * An Iowa lawyer is disciplined for billing a mentally ill vet for attending his birthday party. In his defense, I wouldn’t want to go to a client’s birthday without getting paid either. [Omaha World-Herald]

    * A new book tackles working in Biglaw by comparing it to Greek myth. Theseus (affiliate link) envisions the Athenian hero as a corporate securities lawyer. The partner with a bull’s head should watch his back, if you know what I mean. [Grayson Stevens]

    * Rick Hasen explains that today’s decision in Arizona v. Inter-Tribal Council actually gave states way more power to disenfranchise voters than it appeared at first blush. So that’s how Scalia got in the majority. [The Daily Beast]

    * Massive open online courses (MOOCs) may replace some law schools because getting a J.D. should be a lot more like unlocking an XBox achievement. [Legal Ethics Forum]

    * Associates should hold themselves accountable more often. Honestly this article had me when it cast Littlefinger as a positive role model for working in Biglaw. [Associate's Mind]

    * Looking for a cooking blog with legal puns? Then here you go! I’m going to go have a “Brownie v. Board of Education.” [Corpus Delicti-ble]

    * The Federal Bar Association is hosting an event tomorrow asking, “Is Our Federal Justice System Being Dismantled?” [Federal Bar Association]

    4 Comments / / Jun 17, 2013 at 5:31 PM
  • Peter Devlin

    Ask the Experts, Biglaw, Books, Jeffrey Toobin, Partner Issues, Patents, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    The ATL Interrogatories: 10 Questions with Peter Devlin from Fish & Richardson

    Peter J. Devlin of Fish & Richardson answers 10 questions for The ATL Interrogatories.

    1 Comment / / Jun 12, 2013 at 1:19 PM
  • Shakespeare

    Books, Gay Marriage, Guns / Firearms, Non-Sequiturs, Texas

    Non-Sequiturs: 06.11.13

    * Shakespeare’s “First thing we do, let’s kill all the lawyers,” has multiple meanings. Or so say lawyers trying to lawyer their way out of being reviled. [The Read Zone]

    * Embracing your identity is good advice for life and career. Just note that one of those identities is as a meaningless cog in the legal machine. [Ms. JD]

    * Florida attorney Marshall Dore Louis sought some phone records from the government that he claims might provide an alibi for his client. The government claimed it did not have the records. Judge Robin Rosenbaum politely called bulls**t, having recently read about the government having EVERYONE’S PHONE RECORDS. [Southern District of Florida Blog]

    * Lisa Linsky muses about the difficulty of waiting for universal recognition of same sex marriage. [Huffington Post]

    * Attorney Carolyn Barnes, who landed in hot water after shooting at a census worker, has been convicted. I wonder where she’ll be residing in 7 years? [KXAN]

    * Albany Law School is cutting enrollment and slashing faculty appears to be next. It sucks to lose your job, but at least you’ll be able to move out of Albany. Small miracles! [The Business Review]

    * A review of Run, Brother, Run: A Memoir of a Murder in My Family (affiliate link), a memoir from attorney David Berg covering his career and family from arguing before the Supreme Court, to serving as legal counsel to President Carter, to the killing of his brother at the hands of Woody Harrelson’s father. [NY Times]

    * Three SUNY-Buffalo Law Students have a band and their cover of Icona Pop’s I Love It is trending. The Spin Wires turn the electro house number into an Offspring like rock song. Video after the jump… [BroBible]

    16 Comments / / Jun 11, 2013 at 5:29 PM
  • Apple logo LF 2

    Antitrust, Biglaw, Books, Department of Justice, Partner Issues, Technology, Trials

    Hiring Biglaw Partner Is the First Thing Apple’s Done Right Since the iPad

    The government’s case against Apple hits a major snag when Apple’s counsel rips up the star witness.

    17 Comments / / Jun 11, 2013 at 2:26 PM
  • Edward Snowden

    Art, Attorney Misconduct, Bankruptcy, Biglaw, Books, Clerkships, Headhunters / Recruiters, Howrey LLP, Legal Ethics, Morning Docket, New Jersey, Privacy, SCOTUS, Sonia Sotomayor, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 06.10.13

    * Edward Snowden, the computer technician who leaked details on the programs the NSA didn’t want you to know about, sacrificed his life to save your privacy’s soul. Thanks a bunch, Technology Jesus! [CNN]

    * While we wait for Fisher, DOMA, and Prop 8, if you’d like some background info on the people behind the most controversial and talked about SCOTUS cases of the term, give this one a read. [NBC News]

    * If a justice claims he’s never met a homosexual and he’s got a gay law clerk, telling him to “look around [his] chambers” to find one is the NKI. My, how times have changed since the mid-80s. [New York Times]

    * In 2012, Justice Sotomayor earned $1.9 million in royalties from her memoir, My Beloved World (affiliate link). Yeah, her world is probably so beloved because she’s rolling around in money. [Blog of Legal Times]

    * Howrey going to make use of this empty wall space? If you’re in the market for some art, this bankrupt firm’s decor will be up for auction in D.C. later this week. [Bankruptcy Beat / Wall Street Journal]

    * When you’re dealing with the most beautiful people in Biglaw, the price for pretty is high: Davis Polk was slapped with a million-dollar lawsuit over a recruiter’s fee. [Thomson Reuters News & Insight]

    * Gerald Shargel, criminal defense attorney to the Mafia stars, is retiring his shingle to join Winston & Strawn. Biglaw better keep him entertained — he gets bored easily. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * Cory Booker, one of everyone’s favorite Yale Law School grads, announced his candidacy for a New Jersey Senate seat over the weekend. Best of luck in the special election! [The Note / ABC News]

    * The feds are seeking a four-year sentence for former Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. in his campaign funds misuse case. No MJ memorabilia is worth prison time, no matter how big a fan you are. [The Hill]

    * “[I]f you ever call me on my cellphone again, I’ll strangle you.” Yikes. Looks like this Kentucky judge won’t have the chance to wring his hands around lawyers’ necks any time soon. [Courier-Journal]

    10 Comments / / Jun 10, 2013 at 9:03 AM
  • Sasso_Gary_09

    Ask the Experts, Biglaw, Books, Movies, Partner Issues

    The ATL Interrogatories: 10 Questions with Gary Sasso of Carlton Fields

    Gary Sasso, president and CEO of Carlton Fields, answers 10 questions as part of the ATL Interrogatories.

    1 Comment / / May 31, 2013 at 2:33 PM
  • career-files-180x100-RF

    Books, Career Center, Career Files, Pre-Law

    From the Career Files: Summer Reading List — Tomorrow’s Lawyers

    Whether you’re looking to join the legal profession or currently practicing law, you should read this book.

    2 Comments / / May 24, 2013 at 12:51 PM
  • Larren Nashelsky RF

    Ask the Experts, Biglaw, Books, Movies, Partner Issues, Pro Bono

    The ATL Interrogatories: 10 Questions with Larren Nashelsky of Morrison & Foerster

    Larren Nashelsky of Morrison & Foerster shares his insights into the legal profession.

    4 Comments / / May 15, 2013 at 2:23 PM
  • Biglaw, Books, Facebook, Federalist Society, General Counsel, Hedge Funds / Private Equity, In-House Counsel, Law Professors, Morning Docket, Murder, Musical Chairs, Partner Issues, Politics, Social Media, Social Networking Websites, Tax Law, Technology

    Morning Docket: 05.13.13

    * Given the name and origins of the Tea Party movement, it actually makes perfect sense that their groups got grief from the IRS. [Washington Post]

    * Wachtell Lipton weighs in against the practice of shareholder activists offering special compensation to director nominees. [Dealbook / New York Times]

    * A law professor, Joshua Silverstein, argues that schools should embrace grade inflation. (But haven’t most of them done this already?) [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Facebook shareholders might not “like” this news, but Ted Ullyot is stepping down as general counsel after almost five years. We’ll have more on this later. [National Law Journal]

    * The Brooklyn DA’s office is reopening 50 murder cases that were worked on by retired detective Louis Scarcella (who looks oh-so-savory in the NYT’s photo of him). [New York Times]

    * In news that should shock no one, Nicholas Speath’s dubious discrimination case against Georgetown Law has been dismissed. [The BLT: The Blog of Legal Times]

    * Not long after leaving Cravath for Kirkland, Sarkis Jebejian is putting together billion-dollar deals for private-equity clients. [Am Law Daily]

    * Professor Jeffrey Rosen reviews an interesting new book, The Federalist Society (affiliate link), authored by Michael Avery and Danielle McLaughlin. [New York Times]

    2 Comments / / May 13, 2013 at 8:43 AM
  • gatsby

    2nd Circuit, Bankruptcy, Books, Law Schools, Movies, Non-Sequiturs, Police

    Non-Sequiturs: 05.08.13

    * Professor Alfred Brophy wonders if The Great Gatsby (affiliate link) provides an early preview of product placement. In any event, I’m willing to bet the new movie will provide a stellar latter day view of product placement. [The Faculty Lounge]

    * Brooklyn Law School will begin offering a 2-year JD program. This makes too much sense. [Brooklyn Law School]

    * Former Dora the Explorer star rebuffed in effort to unwind settlement, in part over claims that she overpaid for her lawyer. He charged $755/hour plus a 37.5% “success fee.” This is the sort of thing that happens if a monkey is your most trusted confidant. [Hollywood Reporter]

    * Oreck files for bankruptcy. Not Orrick, Oreck. They make vacuum cleaners that suck. Figuratively. [USA Today]

    * Urinating on police stations? Detroit sounds like such a charming place. [Legal Juice]

    * If you don’t mind spoilers, here are the answers to all your Iron Man 3 legal queries. Not answered: why was the post-credits scene so lame? [Law and the Multiverse]

    * While created for short-sighted criminal defendants, this applies equally to the hubris of civil defendants who are just SURE they’re going to win. [What the Public Defender?]

    * Caroline Kennedy just paid up her lapsed bar admission. Just in time for a Senate confirmation hearing… you know if she were to get nominated for something. [WiseLawNY]

    3 Comments / / May 8, 2013 at 5:40 PM
  • Richard Wiley

    Ask the Experts, Biglaw, Books, FCC, Movies, Partner Issues

    ATL Interrogatories: 10 Questions with Richard Wiley of Wiley Rein LLP

    Richard Wiley of Wiley Rein LLP shares his insights into the legal profession.

    0 Comments / / May 8, 2013 at 3:14 PM
  • Casey Anthony

    Bankruptcy, Biglaw, Books, Crime, Department of Justice, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Federal Judges, Job Searches, Law Schools, Litigatrix, Morning Docket, Partner Issues, Securities and Exchange Commission, Securities Law, Trials, Women's Issues

    Morning Docket: 05.08.13

    * “Is there a public interest in unwanted pregnancies … that can often result in abortions?” The judge who ordered that Plan B be made available to all women regardless of age is pissed at the DOJ. [The Caucus / New York Times]

    * Mary Jo White, the littlest litigatrix, will “review” the Securities and Exchange Commission’s policy of allowing financial firms to settle civil suits without affirming or denying culpability, but for now, she’s defending it. [Reuters]

    * Dewey know what this failed firm is supposed to pay its advisers for work done during the first nine months of its bankruptcy proceedings? We certainly do, and it’s quite the pretty penny. [Am Law Daily]

    * In a round of musical chairs that started at Weil Gotshal, Cadwalader just lost the co-chairs of its bankruptcy practice and another bankruptcy partner to O’Melveny. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * Another day, another law school comparison website. Take a look at Law Jobs: By the Numbers, which includes a formula from the laughable National Jurist rankings system. [National Law Journal]

    * In a move that shocked absolutely no one, attorneys for Colorado movie theater shooting suspect James Holmes announced they will enter a plea of not guilty by reason of insanity for their client. [CNN]

    * From the “hindsight is 20/20″ file: the judge who presided over the Casey Anthony trial thinks there was enough evidence to convict the ex-MILF. He also likened Jose Baez to a used car salesman. [AP]

    * Check out Logan Beirne’s book (affiliate link). Even when sensationalizing George Washington’s rise from general to president, attention must be paid to the rule of law. [Wall Street Journal (sub. req.)]

    1 Comment / / May 8, 2013 at 9:04 AM

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