Apple

  • Mark Wahlberg

    Morning Docket

    Morning Docket: 12.08.14

    * A student at Barry Law claims someone stole her phone and used it to call an African-American blogger an N-word on Instagram. We’ll have more on this believable story later. [Miami Herald]

    * Mark Wahlberg wants to be pardoned for a crime committed before he was known as Marky Mark. He should also consider asking to be pardoned for The Happening and Planet of the Apes. [CNN]

    * The job market was flat last month, and in 2014, the legal sector lost 3,000 jobs. Don’t worry, you’ll get a job eventually, per the hopes and prayers of your career services employees. [Am Law Daily]

    * Shine bright like A. Diamond: Howrey’s bankruptcy trustee says he’ll have a confirmed creditor-repayment plan “well before” the end of next year. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * iF*ckedUp? The last named plaintiff in the Apple iPod class action may not have bought an iPod during the time period at issue in the suit. [Bits / New York Times]

    * We suppose that with new tech comes new logos, because Covington & Burling is dropping the “& Burling” for global branding purposes. [National Law Journal]

    * David Lat, ATL’s founder and managing editor, doesn’t “think [he’s] defamed anyone” in his book, Supreme Ambitions (aff. link). Yay! We’ll have more on this later. [New York Times]

    25 Comments / / Dec 8, 2014 at 9:01 AM
  • Technology today's tech

    Small Law Firms, Solo Practitioners, Technology, Trusts and Estates

    Today’s Tech: An Estate-Planning Attorney And His Macs

    Just because you’re a lawyer doesn’t mean you’re required to use a PC instead of a Mac.

    12 Comments / / Oct 16, 2014 at 11:10 AM
  • Kamala D. Harris is 'by far, the best looking attorney general.'

    Biglaw, Eric Holder, Google / Search Engines, Law Schools, Mergers and Acquisitions, Morning Docket, Technology, United Kingdom / Great Britain

    Morning Docket: 09.26.14

    * Solicitor General Don Verrilli may be a frontrunner to replace Eric Holder as attorney general, but the competition seems to be stiff. Kamala Harris, anyone? [USA Today]

    * FBI Director James Comey is annoyed by Apple and Google marketing their encryption prowess for privacy’s sake — it’ll “allow people to place themselves beyond the law.” [WSJ Law Blog]

    * White & Case just hopped aboard the onshore outsourcing train with its announcement that it would open a services center in Tampa, Florida. The move will create about 100 jobs, but we’d love to know how many it’s negating. [Tampa Bay Times]

    * Slater & Gordon, the world’s first publicly traded law firm, has been on an “acquisition spree” in England. Earlier this month, it picked up patent practice, and now it’s in talks with a litigation shop. [Am Law Daily]

    * “Law school is a major gamble,” and people are more informed, but that somehow isn’t stopping people from applying. This is a great article to read if you’re still considering going all in. [New York Observer]

    15 Comments / / Sep 26, 2014 at 9:04 AM
  • marijuana pot cannabis

    Marijuana, Non-Sequiturs, Police, Technology

    Non-Sequiturs: 09.23.14

    * City Attorney Pete Holmes is dropping all Seattle marijuana tickets for public smoking. Apparently most of them were issued by a single officer who just disagrees with the new pot law in Washington. I mean, respecting “laws” is certainly not a prerequisite for being a cop, right? [KOMO]

    * With the premiere of Gotham last night, The Legal Geeks have added the show to their regular list of pop culture phenomena that they examine though a legal lens. This should be hard, because I’ve never understood the Gotham Penal Code and the insistence on placing recidivist mass murderers in a revolving door asylum like Arkham. At some point isn’t it time for Supermax? [The Legal Geeks]

    * The SEC hands out a $30 million whistleblower award. Toot toot. [Fortune]

    * State Senate candidate accused by his old firm of falsifying his bills to the tune of $2 million. Sounds to me like he’s ready for higher office. [NY Daily News]

    * More follow-up to Elie’s piece on the Harvard kid who is so sure that making tons of money makes the world a better place. [Washington Post]

    * A comprehensive infographic of expert witness fees gathered from more than 5,000 experts. Spoiler: if you’re concerned about cost you want your case in Montana. [The Expert Institute]

    * Apple isn’t really trying to fight the U.S. government. Really. [Slate]

    * IP Lawyer/Rapper — whom we’ve profiled before — produces an ode to Australians to the tune of Fancy. Yeah there’s not much to add to that.

    2 Comments / / Sep 23, 2014 at 5:03 PM
  • Screen shot 2014-08-04 at 1.27.43 PM

    Intellectual Property

    A Window into the Future for Apple’s Trade Dress?

    A few weeks back, Steve discussed Apple’s recent applications to register a trio of non-verbal trademarks.

    Spoiler alert:

    This post contains the USPTO’s ultimate decision regarding the registrability of the design and layout of various application icons as part of a computer operating system, using rectangular geometric figures in rows. However, it isn’t a spoiler for Apple’s applications referenced above (those applications have yet to be assigned to an examining attorney).

    No, instead, I’m referring to a since-abandoned application that provides some interesting contrast with Apple’s applications. In 2012, Microsoft filed an intent-to-use application for the mark shown below:

    / Jul 31, 2014 at 3:55 PM
  • Juggalo Washington

    5th Circuit, Affirmative Action, Contract Attorneys, Free Speech, Music, Non-Sequiturs, Supreme Court, Technology

    Non-Sequiturs: 07.16.14

    * The Insane Clown Posse is appealing their loss in the “Juggalos aren’t gang members” case. F**king lawsuits, how do they work? [Lowering the Bar]

    * After losing before the Supreme Court, the University of Texas affirmative action admissions program looked to be in serious trouble. But the Fifth Circuit just ruled that the UT policy met the strict-scrutiny analysis mandated by the Court. The lesson for Abigail Fisher is once more, “How about you get better grades instead of whining?” Or at least “Get politically connected.” [Chronicle of Higher Education]

    * Apple agrees to a conditional $450 million settlement with the NYAG’s office in the e-book suit. So you might get some money back from the 50 Shades of Grey purchase. [Reuters]

    * The Manassas city police have decided not to engage in kiddie porn pursuant to a warrant. Good for them. [Washington Post]

    * “Judges are not deities. They are humans.” Let’s not tell Lat, the shock might kill him. [Katz Justice]

    * Maybe it’s time lawyers started looking out for each other. This is a theme we’ve touched on before. [Law and More]

    * The hell? Parents arrested for letting their 9-year-old go to the park alone? Suffocating parenting is bad enough without the government expecting it of parents. [Slate]

    * CPAs are suing the IRS because the regulation of tax preparers lacks Congressional approval. Because we need more folks off the street claiming to be tax preparers. [TaxProf Blog]

    * Lawyer and former South Carolina GOP executive director Todd Kincannon is under investigation by the South Carolina Office of Disciplinary Counsel for basically being a dick on Twitter. As Ken White notes, the First Amendment is all about giving guys like this a forum. [Slate]

    7 Comments / / Jul 16, 2014 at 5:01 PM
  • 'Would you like fries with that, Your Honor?'

    Biglaw, Crime, English Grammar and Usage, Fast Food, Federal Judges, Morning Docket, Patents, SCOTUS, Screw-Ups, State Judges, State Judges Are Clowns, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 06.25.14

    * With OT 2013 drawing to a close, here’s a nifty chart that shows which Supreme Court justices vote together most and least often. The division is real, people. [The Upshot / New York Times]

    * “Not only do they have unique interpretations of the Constitution but they can’t even agree on how to pronounce words.” Listen to our SCOTUS justices flub the word “certiorari.” [Legal Times]

    * Quinn Emanuel and Samsung must now pay more than $2M in sanctions to Nokia and Apple after leaking confidential, “attorneys’ eyes only” information in a discovery blunder. Oopsie! [Legal Week]

    * “Why can’t you get a real job?” This judge — the same one who sentenced a rapist to just 30 days in prison — told a fast-food worker to get a better job to pay off his restitution more quickly. [Billings Gazette]

    * If you think you’ve seen the best of the “Law and ______” classes, you ain’t seen nothing yet. Say hello to some newcomers, like Video Game Law and Law of Robots. Justice Scalia is pissed. [WSJ Law Blog]

    3 Comments / / Jun 25, 2014 at 8:32 AM
  • The innovation word

    Biglaw, Duval & Stachenfeld, Midsize Firms / Regional Firms, Partner Issues, Real Estate, Small Law Firms

    Reinventing The Law Business: Creating Customers – Peter Drucker

    What lessons does the work of management guru Peter Drucker offer for the business of law?

    / Jun 19, 2014 at 2:33 PM
  • Dr. Dre

    Biglaw, Deaths, Federal Judges, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Munger Tolles & Olson, Securities and Exchange Commission, Technology, Texas

    Morning Docket: 05.30.14

    * As you may have heard, Apple is buying Beats Electronics for $3 billion. Apple is being represented by Weil, but don’t worry, no one forgot about Dre — he’s got Munger Tolles and Skadden Arps on his side. [Am Law Daily]

    * Haynes and Boone will have a new managing partner as of January 1, 2015, and to make sure he fulfills the good old Texas stereotype of things being bigger, he wants to grow the hell out of the firm’s Houston office. [Dallas Business Journal]

    * Stephanie Avakian, a WilmerHale partner in the New York office, was tapped by the Securities and Exchange Commission to become its deputy director of enforcement. Yay! [DealBook / New York Times]

    * “We can’t turn law schools into graduate school for the study of law,” says a law prof who thinks legal education is straying from being professional education. Aww, write a paper about it. [Harvard Crimson]

    * A Los Angeles couple has been accused in the hit-and-run death of Judge Dean Pregerson’s son. The judge isn’t “looking for blood,” but some jail time would probably help. [L.A. Now / Los Angeles Times]

    0 Comments / / May 30, 2014 at 9:06 AM
  • sexual harassment

    Commencement, Gay Marriage, General Counsel, Law Reviews, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Politics, Sexual Harassment, Small Law Firms

    Morning Docket: 05.22.14

    * Pennsylvania’s Governor Tom Corbett, who really wants to win his reelection vote in November, won’t appeal the decision striking down the state’s ban on gay marriage, making him the third governor to concede after a major loss in court. [Bloomberg]

    * Sen. Ted Kennedy finally received his diploma from UVA Law, albeit posthumously. The school’s registrar kept it for more than half a century — they didn’t have his address. Lucky guy never received donation letters, either. [National Law Journal]

    * An associate is suing her former boss for six figures after he allegedly sent her erotic emails about his fantasy workplace affair. Her fantasy of loan repayment may come true if she wins this case. [Oregonian]

    * Apple’s general counsel Bruce Sewell gave some pretty great advice to recent graduates at GW Law: “Be someone [your boss] can talk to, rather than someone she can give orders to.” [Corporate Counsel]

    * The New Mexico Law Review is dedicating an upcoming issue to articles related to Breaking Bad, which officially makes it one of the only law reviews whose pages will be read by human beings. [WSJ Law Blog]

    3 Comments / / May 22, 2014 at 8:59 AM
  • Apple logo 2

  • En garde, esquires of the Biglaw realm!

    Basketball, Biglaw, Cars, Google / Search Engines, In-House Counsel, Law Firm Mergers, Law Firm Names, Money, Morning Docket, Patents, Patton Boggs, Racism, Real Estate, Technology

    Morning Docket: 05.19.14

    * Partners from Patton Boggs and Squire Sanders may vote on their merger sometime this week. Get ready to say hello to Squire Patton, House of Boggs, Hodorific of Its Name. [Reuters]

    * “[E]xcuse me, sir, you may not be here in five years.” Biglaw firms are becoming more “egalitarian” about office space because attorneys have expiration dates. [National Law Journal]

    * After a flat year in 2013, and much to Biglaw’s chagrin, “[i]t is going to be harder to sustain year-over-year profitability gains.” Oh joy, time to power up the layoff machine. [Philadelphia Inquirer]

    * Tech giants Apple and Google have called a ceasefire in their dueling patent suits in a quest to reform patent law — and so Apple can concentrate all of its efforts on suing the sh*t out of Samsung. [Bloomberg]

    * GM’s in-house legal department is being heavily scrutinized in the wake of the car maker’s ignition switch lawsuit extravaganza. You see, friends, people die when lawyers don’t even bother to lie. [New York Times]

    * Donald Sterling found a lawyer willing to represent him, an antitrust maven who thinks the NBA should take its ball and go home because “no punishment was warranted” in his client’s case. [WSJ Law Blog]

    0 Comments / / May 19, 2014 at 9:12 AM
  • Quinn Emanuel Urquhart Sullivan small

    Biglaw, Intellectual Property, john quinn, Litigators, Technology, Trials

    John Quinn Likens Case To Vietnam — Hopefully With Less Napalm

    Don’t you just love the smell of IP litigation in the morning?

    24 Comments / / May 7, 2014 at 2:11 PM
  • U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara

    1st Circuit, American Bar Association / ABA, Asians, Bankruptcy, Biglaw, California, Judicial Nominations, Jury Duty, Law Professors, Malpractice, Morning Docket, Politics, S.D.N.Y., Technology, Trials

    Morning Docket: 05.06.14

    * U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara wants to know more about why Governor Andrew Cuomo shut down an anticorruption commission. [New York Times]

    * The ABA weighs in on the “unfinished business” controversy affecting bankrupt law firms, their lawyers, and their clients. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Better late than never: students and professors at UC Davis Law are pushing for the posthumous admission to the California bar of Hong Yeng Chang, who was denied a law license in 1890 solely because of his Chinese heritage. [Associated Press; South China Morning Post]

    * Speaking of late, a robber sent to prison 13 years late because of a clerical error just got released. [ABA Journal]

    * Drones could claim another victim: the First Circuit nomination of Harvard law professor David Barron. [How Appealing]

    * Who still wants a landline phone? The jury foreman in the latest Apple-Samsung battle, who is sick and tired of cellphones after the month-long trial. [The Recorder (sub. req.)]

    * Not such a Great Adventure: “Cadwalader To Pay $17M In Six Flags Malpractice Fight.” [Law360 (sub. req.)]

    1 Comment / / May 6, 2014 at 9:22 AM
  • 'I can't decide what kind of phone

    Cellphones, Federal Judges, Patents, Quote of the Day, Technology, Trials

    Federal Judge Shames Attorneys For Phone Use During Tech Trial

    Put those phones away, lest you anger this judge.

    10 Comments / / Apr 9, 2014 at 4:29 PM
  • resume-tips

    2nd Circuit, American Bar Association / ABA, Antitrust, Canada, Department of Justice, Job Searches, Law Schools, Money, Morning Docket, Technology

    Morning Docket: 02.11.14

    * The DOJ lifted its three-year hiring freeze yesterday. There are thousands of jobs out there waiting for the perfect applicant. You know what that means: apply to EVERY SINGLE JOB and see what sticks. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Sorry, Apple, but it looks like you’re going to have to keep that pricey e-books antitrust monitor after all. The Second Circuit just nixed the company’s bid to ditch Michael Bromwich of Goodwin Procter. [Reuters]

    * It looks like the ABA is going to move toward allowing paid externships for law students — because being paid to work is smarter than paying to work. Oh good, we’re glad someone finally realized that. [National Law Journal]

    * Cleveland-Marshall’s solo practice incubator will be up and running in March. Ten lucky grads will pay rent to their law school to learn what they should’ve when they were still paying tuition. [Cleveland Plain Dealer]

    * If you think you’ve got it bad as a 3L here in America, think again. Canadian 3Ls in Ontario are looking at a 79 percent increase in articling and licensing fees, bringing the grand total to almost $5,000. [CBC News]

    0 Comments / / Feb 11, 2014 at 9:14 AM
  • Juri the Dreamer by Juri H Chinchilla RF

    Intellectual Property, Music, Trademarks, United Kingdom / Great Britain

    On Remand: Apple Wedges Itself Into The Music Business

    The Beatles’ company, Apple Corps, sued Apple Computer in Britain. Who prevailed in this legal battle of the Apples?

    9 Comments / / Feb 10, 2014 at 1:40 PM
  • Amanda Knox

    Benchslaps, Biglaw, Drugs, Football, Job Searches, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Murder, Prostitution, Sex, Sports, State Attorneys General, Technology, Trials

    Morning Docket: 01.31.14

    * Quinn Emanuel got a pretty harsh benchslap from Judge Paul Grewal over its litigation strategy in the Apple / Samsung case, calling it “650 lawyers wide and one lawyer deep.” Sick burn, Judge. [Courthouse News Service]

    * At Cardozo Law, Jordan Belfort’s former lawyer says that the movie Wolf of Wall Street “played down the sex and drugs.” Dear Lord, if that’s the case, Leo’s muse should be happy he’s alive. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * “I’ve been around the block. And I’ve never seen an attorney general sanctioned.” Ahh, the rarest rose. Nevada’s AG was sanctioned for failing to provide evidence in a fraud case against a mortgage lender. [Forbes]

    * Eighteen people were arrested for their alleged attempts to market and sell Super Bowl “party packs” to football fans. It’s pretty sick, but you’d got to admit that hookers and blow beat wings any day of the week. [Bloomberg]

    * Law schools in the Southeast closed their doors because their states were “unequipped for dealing with the roadways.” Send them up here, we’ve got school when there’s a foot of snow. [National Law Journal]

    * A recent grad of a “good school” wanted to know how to get a job, so she asked an advice columnist. Here are five of the suggested jobs she probably already applied to and was rejected from. [Fortune]

    * The third time’s apparently the charm in Italy: Amanda Knox was convicted of murder, again. Foxy Knoxy must be pissed that her case has turned into an extradition question on an international law exam. [CNN]

    15 Comments / / Jan 31, 2014 at 8:57 AM

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