E-Discovery

Gavel

On July 14, 2014, the Court in United States v. University of Nebraska at Kearny (No. 4:11CV3209) took a significant step in support of Federal Rules 1 and 26. Magistrate Judge Cheryl R. Zwart denied plaintiff’s motion to compel defendants to use plaintiffs’ proposed search terms to cull electronically stored information (ESI) for review and production. The Court’s order effectively discharged defendants’ obligation to produce any ESI. And the Court issued this order notwithstanding both that 1) the parties had agreed to a stipulation summarizing protocol for the production of ESI shortly after the outset of the case, and 2) plaintiff previously produced ESI as part of its production to defendants’ discovery requests. In short, plaintiffs’ unwillingness to fairly compromise as to the breadth of search terms aimed at reasonably limiting the scope of ESI production came back to bite.

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Tread Lightly: eDiscovery Greed May Leave You With None At All”


I miss the old days
I’d scare natives with eclipse!
Now? [Shrug] check Twitter

The bad news: we took away the “easy” button in eDiscovery. The good news: see “the bad news”

Having reviewed a bit of the story of eDiscovery, it may be time to reveal another insider secret: eDiscovery used to be easy. Why? Because we were all good at it? Nope—not at all; it was easy for the exact opposite reason. No one had the slightest idea what they were doing, and so the bar for being an eDiscovery expert was pretty darned low. There were no applicable rules for using electronic information in evidence or requesting ESI in discovery. There were very few cases, reported or otherwise. Most importantly, almost no one had an inkling that stuff on peoples’ computers could be actually useful for lawsuits. Why even worry about it?

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “The Natives Are Unimpressed”

Ed note: This post originally appeared on Peter S. Vogel’s Internet, Information Technology & e-Discovery Blog.

A recent administrative order was issued for Google to “to take the necessary technical and organisational measures to guarantee that their users can decide on their own if and to what extend their data is used for profiling.” Last week the Hamburg Commissioner of Data Protection and Freedom of Information (HmbBfDI) ordered that Google is “compelled to collect and combine user data only in accordance with the existing legal framework.”

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Privacy Policy Challenge: Google Ordered to Cease Data Profiling in Germany”


Gavel

On September 17, the U.S. Tax Court, in Dynamo Holdings LP v. Commissioner, 143 T.C. No. 9 (Sept. 17, 2014), held that a taxpayer could use predictive coding, over the objection of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), to identify relevant electronically stored information (ESI) for production. This is the first Tax Court case to address the use of predictive coding in response to a discovery request.

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Legal Alert: The Tax Court Approves the Use of Predictive Coding”

Ed note: This post originally appeared on Peter S. Vogel’s Internet, Information Technology & e-Discovery Blog.

When the defendants could not otherwise be located and served by paper, face-to-face, two Judges ordered service on Facebook since the defendants were in Turkey and Antigua. Since Turkey “has not specifically objected to service by email or social media networking sites which are not explicitly listed as means of service” on February 20, 2014, US Magistrate Judge Thomas Rawles Jones, Jr. (Eastern District of Virginia) in the case Whoshere, Inc., v. Gokhan Orun d/b/a/ WhoNear; Who Near; whonear.me ordered that the summons and complaint could be transmitted to the defendant under Federal Rules of Civil Procedure 4(f)(3) by:

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Two Courts Permit Defendants To Be Served on Facebook”

Ed note: This post originally appeared on Peter S. Vogel’s Internet, Information Technology & e-Discovery Blog.

Since the plaintiff did not a file a lawsuit against John Doe, the Texas trial court had no jurisdiction to allow the plaintiff to take the deposition of “Trooper,” an anonymous blogger who launched on on-line attack on the CEO of a company who lives in Houston. In the case of In Re John Doe a/k/a “Trooper” on August 29, 2014 the Texas Supreme Court ruled 5-4 the pre-litigation discovery seeking John Doe’s identity is unacceptable in Texas, and the discovery to learn the identity of John Doe can only proceed if a lawsuit is filed.

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “John Doe Can Remain Anonymous and Not Be Deposed in Pre-Litigation Discovery”

Look, e-discovery is not going away. Doc review (at least English language doc review) will never be high paying or sexy. But, as e-discovery becomes more and more prevalent, it will continue to become a larger part of the legal job market. So, how do you get out of the rut of sitting in a windowless room, making $10 an hour (or less), typing the date of each e-mail you read into the date field of your coding software? How about taking your knowledge of the front line ESI issues (document coding) and learn a little bit about managing ESI projects, starting with how to draft discovery? As we learned yesterday, ESI discovery can be tricky and employers mostly know that, so understanding the concepts behind it can help you move through your career.

Since Bryan Garner was just in my town last weekend, and I’ve been spending a lot of time drafting ESI discovery requests and dealing with  opposing counsel’s requests, I have been thinking a lot about drafting proper ESI discovery requests, including proper wording…

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “An Illustrated Guide On How To Avoid Drafting Horrible ESI Discovery”

Bert and Ernie. Peanut butter and jelly. Salt and pepper. Some things just go together; these natural partnerships add up to more than the sum of their parts. So when I came across a press release announcing a partnership between an ediscovery vendor and a law school, it made perfect…

Wait.

What?

There is going to be a doc review shop at a law school. And apparently the law school is okay with that, even excited.

What exactly is going on here?

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Law School Gives Up On Actually Trying To Get Grads A Real Job”

Ed note: This post originally appeared on Peter S. Vogel’s Internet, Information Technology & e-Discovery Blog.

A recent survey about BYOD (“Bring Your Own Device”) resulted in the finding that “78% of employees use their own mobile devices for work” and “the use of personal technology to access corporate data can be solved by better communication between both parties regarding security, data and privacy concerns.” On July 10, 2014 Webroot issued its BYOD Security Report entitled “Fixing the Disconnect Between Employer and Employee for BYOD (Bring Your Own Device)” which included these key findings:

double red triangle arrows Continue reading ““BYOD Bill of Rights” May Help Concerns about Privacy”

Lawyers, by nature, are not very optimistic people. Maybe it’s a function of assessing risk constantly — with your ass on the line no less. Or just that lawyers tend to get called in after the s**t has hit the fan, so we aren’t generally exposed to the very best of humanity.

I can no longer remember if I was an optimistic, glass-half-full kinda person before law school, but surely there was some spark in me that saw the good in people and situations. I know because I just felt that small flame of hope flickering in my chest get extinguished. And it’s all because of a job posting

So what job is so bad it has me questioning my very faith in humanity?

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Why The New Normal For Document Review Spells Disaster”

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