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  • SM cube

    Biglaw, Facebook, Social Media, Social Networking Websites, Twittering

    The Social Law Firm Index: Biglaw’s New Media Mavens

    The Social Law Firm Index: a review of the Am Law 50’s use of social media in the areas of reach, engagement, and owned media.

    0 Comments / / Jan 21, 2014 at 4:01 PM
  • Ylvis_The_Fox

    9th Circuit, Drugs, Food, Non-Sequiturs, Parties, Police, Technology, Wal-Mart

    Non-Sequiturs: 01.15.14

    * Wal-Mart may recall loads of donkey meat from their stores. Not because they sold donkey meat — they intended to do that — but because there was fox meat mixed in. What does the Fox Say? Nothing, because it was ground into donkey meat. The end. [MSN Money]

    * Of course Colorado got rid of mile marker 420. But it’s not because they don’t like weed — it’s legal there, after all — check out the real reason. [Lowering the Bar]

    * Judges are reading briefs on iPads now? Here’s how you write a brief for a judge who has an app for “law.” [Columbia Business Law Review]

    * A listing of this lawyer’s previous representations. In the words of our tipster: “Don’t know what’s worse: Courtney Love or the Gambino crime family.” [Andrew Mancilla, Esq.]

    * The Ninth Circuit gave the go-ahead for about 60,000 tech workers to sue Google, Apple, and other companies for artificially driving down wages by agreeing not to poach each others’ employees. Hey, give these folks some love, not every one of them is going to go start a new video game company. [Reuters]

    * A lot of Cuban-American families in Miami blow a lot of money on quinceañeras. Here’s a way to recoup some funds: throw a completely innocent party and wait for the cops to come by and commit police brutality. This guy netted $90,000 that way. [Miami New Times]

    2 Comments / / Jan 15, 2014 at 5:03 PM
  • SM cube

    Biglaw, Facebook, Social Media, Social Networking Websites, Twittering

    Biglaw’s Brave New Social World

    Why are law firms putting effort into social media, and how well are they doing?

    2 Comments / / Dec 10, 2013 at 4:31 PM
  • iStock_000014825830

    Department of Justice, Facebook, Microsoft, Privacy, Technology

    DOJ Refuses To Let Tech Companies See Legal Arguments It’s Making Against Them

    DOJ gets a lot of use out of that black highlighter.

    10 Comments / / Nov 15, 2013 at 10:24 AM
  • SchillingNew

    Baseball, Constitutional Law, Federal Circuit, Google / Search Engines, Movies, Non-Sequiturs, Patents, Richard Posner, Securities and Exchange Commission, Technology, Television, Women's Issues

    Non-Sequiturs: 09.12.13

    * The hits keep on coming for Curt Schilling. Now the SEC has woken up and decided to probe the $75 million he secured from the state of Rhode Island (already the subject of another suit). Maybe he can fake another bloody sock to generate some sympathy. [Bloomberg]

    * Apple sold a “Season Pass” to Breaking Bad Season 5 and then refused to honor the second half of the season to its subscribers, prompting an Ohio doctor to file suit for $20, with hopes of building a class action. Look, Apple needed that money; Tim Cook is desperate these days. [Deadline: Hollywood]

    * Speaking of Apple, the Federal Circuit looks like it’s going to give Apple another crack at its claim that Google ripped off the iPhone patents, citing “significant” errors on the part of the last judge to rule on the dispute: Richard Posner. You come at the king, you best not miss. [Wall Street Journal]

    * And last, but definitely not least, Apple’s new fingerprint ID will be the death of the Fifth Amendment. Discuss. [Wired]

    * A film chock-full of unsanctioned footage and insulting knocks on Disney has been picked up for distribution. This is your official warning that it’s time to prepare the beauty pageant pitch for the Disney execs. [Grantland]

    * Elie smash, Charlotte Law School. [NPR Charlotte]

    * The International Association of Young Lawyers conference will feature a speed dating session (on page 6). Really hard-hitting program there. [International Association of Young Lawyers]

    * Congratulations to the 49 firms honored for meeting all of WILEF’s criteria for Gold Standard certification at today’s awards gala! [Women in Law Empowerment Forum]

    20 Comments / / Sep 12, 2013 at 5:01 PM
  • 220px-Eliot_Spitzer

    Abortion, Eliot Spitzer, Law School Deans, Law Schools, Legal Ethics, Non-Sequiturs, Prostitution, Technology, Trials

    Non-Sequiturs: 08.21.13

    * Should Eliot Spitzer have faced harsher sanctions for pounding hookers? It’s a pretty interesting question that we can all ponder for the next four years after Spitzer demolishes Scott Stringer in the Comptroller race. [Wise Law]

    * Homeowners were forced to pay hundreds in legal charges for lawsuits that don’t really exist. Stay classy foreclosure practices. [Overlawyered]

    * Blackacre: The Poem. [Poetic Justice]

    * The New York State Bar says lawyers have a reasonable expectation of privacy if they use Gmail. Google disagrees. [3 Geeks and a Law Blog]

    * A round-up of law school officials facing discipline for deceitful advertising. Take note deans. [TaxProf Blog]

    * A woman is indicted for taking her 13-year-old daughter to get an abortion. And it’s not even Alabama. [Wild About Trial]

    * Lawyer and witness repeatedly flip each other off during cross. Video after the jump…

    5 Comments / / Aug 21, 2013 at 5:01 PM
  • career-files-180x100-RF

    Ask the Experts, Career Alternatives, Career Center, Career Files, Law Schools, Law Students, Lawyers, Layoffs

    From the Career Files: How To Use The JD/MBA Degree In Business And Entrepreneurship

    Kristina Tsamis, ATL’s Research Manager, shares some career advice for JD/MBAs that was presented at a panel discussion hosted by the Cornell Law School Alumni Association and Duke Law School.

    / Aug 2, 2013 at 3:17 PM
  • Lauren Giddings

    Biglaw, Books, Clarence Thomas, Deaths, Google / Search Engines, Immigration, Labor / Employment, Morning Docket, Murder, Partner Issues, Partner Profits, Pro Bono, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 06.19.13

    * You think you know Justice Clarence Thomas, but you have no idea. Here are several myths about the silent Supreme Court star that he was capable of busting in just this term alone. [WSJ Law Blog (sub. req.)]

    * According to the CBO, the immigration reform bill being considered in the Senate would allow eight million immigrants to gain legal status and lower the deficit by billions. But alas, dey still terk er jerbs! [NPR]

    * Google is doing its best to try not to be evil by asking the FISA court to ease up on gag orders preventing the internet giant from telling the world about what it’s required to give to the government. [Washington Post]

    * Florida firm Becker & Poliakoff will withhold 20% of equity partners’ pay, a move that made some lawyers cry. The firm is apparently planning to save the cash for a rainy day. [Daily Business Review]

    * Paul Mannina, an attorney with the Labor Department charged with sexually assaulting a coworker, was found in his cell with his throat slashed. Police are investigating the death. [Washington Post]

    * FYI, your aspirational pro bono hours — or complete and utter lack thereof — will now be public record in New York, and you must report them on your biannual registration forms. [New York Law Journal]

    * Coming soon to a law school near you: really old books from the 13th century that’ll probably turn into dust if you dare try to read them. You can find this nerdgasm over at Yale Law. [National Law Journal]

    * The family of Lauren Giddings, the slain Mercer Law graduate, has filed a $5 million wrongful death suit in federal court against accused killer Stephen McDaniel in the hopes of finding her remains. [Telegraph]

    5 Comments / / Jun 19, 2013 at 9:07 AM
  • Apple logo LF 2

    Antitrust, Biglaw, Books, Department of Justice, Partner Issues, Technology, Trials

    Hiring Biglaw Partner Is the First Thing Apple’s Done Right Since the iPad

    The government’s case against Apple hits a major snag when Apple’s counsel rips up the star witness.

    17 Comments / / Jun 11, 2013 at 2:26 PM
  • Ted Olson and David Boies

  • DaNae Couch

    Andrew Cuomo, B for Beauty, Biglaw, Department of Justice, FTC, Google / Search Engines, Law Schools, Morning Docket, New York Times, Patents, State Judges, Wall Street Journal

    Morning Docket: 01.04.13

    * The Department of Justice has reached yet another settlement in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill case, this time with Transocean Ltd. for $1.4 billion in civil and criminal penalties and fines. [National Law Journal]

    * “[W]ith success comes regulatory scrutiny.” Google convinced the FTC to close its ongoing antitrust probe by promising to change its allegedly shady patent usage and purportedly skewed search terms. [Bloomberg]

    * According to Littler Mendelson, federal contractors might want to consider sending out sequestration-related layoff notices to employees in order to comply with the WARN Act. America, f**k yeah! [Government Executive]

    * Governor Andrew Cuomo will have a major impact on the New York Court of Appeals when appointing new judges. It could be a partisan decision, but his father, former Governor Mario Cuomo, insists his son will leave politics at home. [Capital New York]

    * When you write in defense of the value proposition of law school, you wind up in the op-ed pages of the NYT. When you tell the truth about it, you wind up in the opinion pages of the WSJ. [Wall Street Journal (sub. req.)]

    * Remember Danae Couch, the Texas Tech law student who was crowned as Miss Texas? She’ll compete for the Miss America title next weekend. If you’d like to help her become a finalist, you can vote for her here! [KFYO]

    0 Comments / / Jan 4, 2013 at 9:11 AM
  • restaurant

    Bloomberg, Books, Career Alternatives, Food, Google / Search Engines, Videos, YouTube

    Career Alternatives for Attorneys: Restaurant Reviewer Surveyor

    * Billable hours in Biglaw are down 1.5 percent, and 15 percent of U.S. firms are planning to reduce their partnership ranks in early 2013. Thanks to Wells Fargo for bringing us the news of all this holiday cheer! [Thomson Reuters News & Insight]

    * Hostess may be winding down its business and liquidating its assets, but Biglaw will always be there to clean up the crumbs. Jones Day, Venable, and Stinson Morrison Hecker obviously think money tastes better than Twinkies. [Am Law Daily]

    * How’s that “don’t be evil” thing working out for you? Google’s $22.5M proposed privacy settlement with the FTC over tracking cookies planted on Safari browsers was accepted by a federal judge. [Bloomberg]

    * Greenberg Traurig and Hunton & Williams face a $7.2B suit from Allen Stanford’s receiver over a former attorney of both firms’ alleged involvement in the ex-knight’s Ponzi scheme. [Houston Business Journal]

    * Perhaps the third time will be the charm: ex-Mayer Brown partner Joseph Collins was convicted, again, for helping Refco steal more than $2B from investors by concealing the company’s fraud. [New York Law Journal]

    * H. Warren Knight, founder of alternative dispute resolution company JAMS, RIP. [National Law Journal]

    1 Comment / / Nov 19, 2012 at 9:25 AM
  • diversity

    American Bar Association / ABA, Bankruptcy, Biglaw, Books, Copyright, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Education / Schools, Edwards Wildman, Federal Judges, General Counsel, Google / Search Engines, Morning Docket, Partner Issues, State Judges, State Judges Are Clowns, Texas

    Morning Docket: 10.05.12

    * Dewey know when Judge Martin Glenn will issue his ruling on the failed firm’s proposed partner contribution plan? If all goes according to plan, we can expect to learn if the PCP’s been approved or rejected as early as next week. [Am Law Daily]

    * Hot on the heels of Google’s digital-book settlement, the company announced that it would be appealing its copyright infringement jury verdict in the Oracle trial. One thing’s for sure: Judge Alsup will be angered terribly by this. [Bloomberg]

    * David Askew, formerly the director of Edwards Wildman’s pro bono program, will now lead the National Association of Minority and Women Owned Law Firms as CEO and general counsel. [Corporate Counsel]

    * The American Bar Association submitted an amicus brief in support of using race as a factor in college admissions, because diversity in college education is a must for diversity in law schools, duh. [ABA Journal]

    * Remember the family law judge who got caught beating his daughter in a video that went viral? Now he wants the Texas Supreme Court to reinstate him, over his ex-wife’s objections. Good luck with that. [CNN]

    8 Comments / / Oct 5, 2012 at 9:11 AM
  • Google Dont Be Evil

    Free Speech, Google / Search Engines, International Law, Technology

    Here’s How A Google Executive Gets Arrested Abroad

    Google is in some legal trouble down in Brazil. What are the allegations?

    11 Comments / / Sep 28, 2012 at 11:42 AM
  • Scalia v. Posner meets Mean Girls

    Antonin Scalia, Blogging, Contracts, Food, Free Speech, Google / Search Engines, Law Professors, Money, Non-Sequiturs, Pornography, Richard Posner, Sports, Student Loans

    Non-Sequiturs: 09.24.12

    * Someone was finally able to liken the Scalia v. Posner debate to a suitable situation: bitchy mean girls fighting each other in a middle school cafeteria. Seriously, only the inclusion of “like” throughout the entirety of the dialogue could’ve made it better. [lawprofblawg]

    * Who pays your law professors’ salary? The obvious answer is law students, since professorial wallets are padded by tuition dollars. But what happens when IBR comes into play and loan debts are forgiven? Then the answer shifts to the taxpayers. [PrawfsBlawg]

    * When Derek Boogaard of the New York Rangers died, everyone was expecting that a lawsuit would be filed, but no one really thought that it would be one based on contract law. [New York Law and Legal Analysis Blog]

    * What kind of case “really turn[s] on” everyone’s favorite First Amendment lawyer? Free speech cases that are riddled with challenges, of course, and questions about what does and doesn’t constitute porn. [Vegas Inc]

    * You must be wondering where Above the Law fell on this ranking of the 15 Most Influential Law Blogs. We won’t give it away, but let’s just say that we now share something in common with Cooley. [Business Insider]

    * “[S]ome dude with the munchies is getting a little legal education.” That’s what we thought when one of our top searches last week was “pictures of tacos” — and not even “duck tacos,” but regular ones. [Search Party]

    3 Comments / / Sep 24, 2012 at 5:21 PM
  • phone

    Department of Justice, Facebook, Google / Search Engines, Insider Trading, Intellectual Property, Morning Docket, Technology, Trials

    Morning Docket: 08.01.12

    * In the Apple-Samsung trial yesterday, Apple’s attorneys accused Samsung of intentionally copying the iPhone. Samsung’s attorney was like, Bro, step off. And then Judge Lucy Koh and all the members of the gallery and the jury crowded around in a circle and started yelling Techno-fight! Techno fight! [Wall Street Journal]

    * Matthew Kluger, formerly of Wilson Sonsini and more recently convicted and sentenced to 12 years in prison for insider trading, gives an interview about what motivated him to commit his crimes. [Bloomberg]

    * France is not happy that Google did not delete all its Street View information from the country after it promised to. Shockingly, some parts of the world apparently still value data privacy. How quaint! [New York Times]

    * Former Perkins Coie partner Harold DeGraff must arbitrate his compensation battle with his former law firm. But the process will not have to be kept confidential. [Thomson Reuters]

    * I’m pretty sure at this point the DOJ is just consulting a Ouija board in its increasingly feeble attempts to prosecute Megaupload. [Wired /Threat Level]

    * UBS is not happy that it lost $356 million on the Facebook IPO. Now it’s suing NASDAQ over the snafu. [CNNMoney]

    4 Comments / / Aug 1, 2012 at 9:01 AM
  • fast-and-furious

    Billable Hours, Eric Holder, Google / Search Engines, Health Care / Medicine, Non-Sequiturs, Politics, YouTube

    Non-Sequiturs: 06.20.12

    * Hyper-competitive weekend warrior kills himself racing down a mountain path and his family is suing the internet start-up that makes an app that allows you to track your time against other users. Is anybody making an app to track really stupid lawsuits filed by bereaved family members who receive terrible legal advice during times of crisis? [Not-So Private Parts / Forbes]

    * The Fast and the Furious Legal Edition: Executive of Privilege. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Bringing the billable hour to social media seems likely to make me cry. [Legal Cheek]

    * Former SCOTUS clerks think the individual mandate is done for. [Wonkblog / Washington Post]

    * Google threatens to bring the hammer down on YouTube to mp3 converter. [Torrent Freak]

    * Maybe this is the kind of alcohol you can buy with prestige points. [Urban Daddy]

    * The companies who will own the president if Romney wins. [USAToday]

    2 Comments / / Jun 20, 2012 at 6:31 PM

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