Reader Polls

Last week, we asked readers to submit possible captions for this picture (click to enlarge):

Let’s have a look at what our readers came up with, and vote on the finalists…

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Caption Contest Finalists: Hot Cups”

In an era when “disruption” is celebrated, the world of large law firms is one of the last redoubts of conventional wisdom. For a uniquely rule- and precedent-bound profession, this makes sense. Biglaw’s conventional wisdom has the added virtue of being reliable. For example, we can count on Cravath taking the lead — at least chronologically — on bonuses, and for DLA Piper to have the most random Third developing-world offices.

Another reflection of conventional wisdom is the way in which Biglaw lends itself to — and revels in — superlatives and rankings. There tends to be a generally acknowledged and perennially dominant player (or a few) in most practice areas: Wachtell Lipton for M&A, Weil Gotshal for Chapter 11 work, Patton Boggs for lobbying, and so forth. There’s no doubt that many worthy firms get overlooked.

Last year we took a look at which firms’ practice groups were considered “underrated” by peers in the field. Among the notable 2012 nominees: Cahill for corporate law, Arnold & Porter in litigation, and Proskauer for its bankruptcy and tax practices.

We wondered whether the same practice groups were still considered by practitioners to be unfairly underrated. Or are there other firms deserving more recognition?

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Biglaw’s Most Underrated Firms by Practice Area”

We recently asked readers to submit possible captions for this example of innovative lawyer advertising:

Over the holiday weekend, you voted on the finalists, and now it’s time to announce the winner of our contest….

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Caption Contest Winner: Lady Justice Gets A Makeover”

This coming Friday, it is the inalienable right of all Americans to sleep off their hangovers, or riot at Walmart, or do anything at all rather than work for The Man. But Biglaw is a different country. As illustrated by Elie’s decision matrix, the “choice” of whether to work on this sacred day is, for the denizens of the law firm world, fraught with other pressures and expectations. We all know that Biglaw careers demand a Faustian bargain: in return for their fat paychecks (and bonuses?), lawyers are expected to work grueling, unpredictable hours. This time of year, that reality is brought into sharp relief: the “holiday season,” with those “family obligations” and so forth, is something that occurs elsewhere.

But law firm billable expectations are not homogeneous. There are significant differences across practice areas, seniority levels, and, of course, individual firms. So how do the various practices, employment statuses, and firms stack up?

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “The Best Of Hours, The Worst Of Hours: ATL Survey Ratings”

Last week, we asked readers to submit possible captions for this lovely piece of lawyer advertising:

Let’s have a look at what our readers came up with, and vote on the finalists…

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Caption Contest Finalists: Lady Justice Gets A Makeover”

It’s nearly that time of year, when all the grueling hours that Biglaw associates have put in will pay off in the form of fat bonuses. Or don’t pay off, with miserly bonuses, or nothing at all. Or something in between? Point being, we have no idea how the 2013 bonus season will play out. Presumably, the answer is buried somewhere deep in Allen Parker’s unknowable heart.

The signs thus far are not especially encouraging, at least for those with a vested interest. (Admittedly, for most, this is all much ado about white-shoe people problems.)

Yes, Cravath might be doing well, at least if its large partner class is any indication. But on the subject of law firm 2013 profits in general, the Citi Bank Private Law Firm Group’s report on the first half of the year concluded:

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Your 2013 Bonus Season Predictions”

You came, you saw, you voted, and one person conquered in this year’s legally themed Halloween costume contest. As usual, we had our fair share of haters (which was quite rude, considering one of our competitors was a baby).

We’ll let you find out who’s taking home the grand prize in this year’s contest, but first, as a bonus, we’ve got a little treat for you.

We’re going to show you a law-related Halloween costume that wasn’t submitted until last night (someone obviously hasn’t been reading ATL enough). It’s really a crying shame, because this girl’s costume is so incredibly awesome that it probably would’ve been our winner…

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “ATL’s Legally Themed Halloween Costume Contest: The Winner”

Just before Halloween, we asked our readers to submit their legally themed costumes to us for our annual contest. As usual, we got a great crop of entries, and we have a feeling you’re going to like them a lot.

We’ve got seven finalists for you to choose from, and voting starts today. Who will be the winner of this year’s competition? Let’s get to the costumes…

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “ATL’s Legally Themed Halloween Costume Contest: The Finalists”

Earlier this week, we asked readers to submit possible captions for this photo (click to enlarge):

Let’s have a look at what our readers came up with, and vote on the finalists…

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Caption Contest Finalists: Biglaw In A Bottle”

A couple of weeks ago, as Obamacare was just stumbling out of the gate, we asked our readers to tell us about the state of their own health insurance plans through their firms. Since the Recession, we have heard anecdotal evidence that some firms have been using health care cost clawbacks as a stealth expense-cutting tactic and de facto pay cut. We wondered how widespread a phenomenon this practice had become. Well, perhaps that’s a bit disingenuous. We had a strong feeling that, in this time of layoffs and all the rest of the Biglaw belt-tightening measures, that no category of expenses would be immune. And our survey results resoundingly confirm those suspicions: 89% of you tell us that your health insurance premiums have gone up since you started work at your firm.

A relevant tip showed up in the ATL inbox this week. An attorney at a prominent (V25) law firm sent us a memo outlining new changes to the firm’s health plan. Here’s an excerpt: “The deductible for the CIGNA PPO plan will change from $250 single/$750 family to $500 single/$1,000 family. Also, the PPO prescription copays [will all increase]. These changes bring our PPO plan design in line with market
practice for large law firms
(emphasis added)”…

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Biglaw Health Insurance Costs: The ATL Survey Results”

Page 5 of 38123456789...38