No helmet could have saved Matthew Kenney.

On occasion, I get accused of “blaming the victim.” I think that’s unfair. Really, I think I just know the difference between “suicide” (which is something you do to yourself) and “homicide” (which is something somebody does to you).

For instance, if you purposefully ride your bike off of a cliff, that’s a suicide. If, on the other hand, you are riding your bike and minding your own business, and somebody plows into you at 83 miles per hour and you die, that’s a homicide. Somebody killed you.

If the person who ended your life later turns around and sues your parents for allowing you to be killed by a motor vehicle traveling 83 miles per hour, that is blaming the victim.

And that is precisely what a convicted manslaughterer, David Weaving, is doing to the parents of Matthew Kenney. He’s filed a $15,000 counterclaim against the Kenneys from the lunacy of his own jail cell…

While incarcerated, David Weaving has found a way to inflict more pain on the family of his young victim. From AOL News:

The Associated Press reports that David Weaving, who is serving a 10-year sentence for slamming his car into Matthew Kenney, is suing Kenney’s parents for $15,000 for causing him “great mental and emotional pain and suffering” and inhibiting his “capacity to carry on in life’s activities.”

The unusual claim is a countersuit. Last year, Matthew’s parents, Stephen and Joanne Kenney, sued 48-year-old Weaving for $15,000 for negligence in their son’s death.

Weaving contends that the Kenneys were negligent when they allowed their then 14-year-old son to ride his bike without a helmet.

Let’s put that claim in context, Matthew Kenney was riding his bike in a 45 mile per hour zone when Weaving slammed into him going 83 miles per hour. A 16 point buck would have been killed by a car going 83 miles per hour. No helmet was going to save this kid from the recklessness of David Weaving. But I bet the parents of Kenney have spent countless hours grieving and wondering if they could have done anything differently. It is unbelievable that Weaving is now suing these people because he no longer has the freedom to “carry on life’s activities.” Is this guy a freaking sociopath?

Weaving is representing himself. I can only hope that the decision wasn’t by choice.

Driver Convicted in Teen’s Death Sues Victim’s Parents [AOL News]


comments sponsored by

115 comments (hidden for your protection) Show all comments