Every year we have a law revue video contest, in which there are winners, there are losers, and then there are sore losers. This year, we saw some pretty wild accusations being tossed around (including “idea plagiarism,” which is apparently a thing in the minds of industrious law students).

No matter how hard our finalists tried to game the system with their various campaigns, one of them surpassed all the rest. Congratulations go out to the students at West Virginia University College of Law, the winners of our Fifth Annual Law Revue Video Contest.

But of course, there was much drama to be had….

In the comments, an apparent WVU supporter wondered why NYU was doing so well. An NYU student retorted, “Cause West Virginia doesn’t have internet?” Well, it looks like West Virginia has internet, because they helped us reach a record number of votes, again. Last year, there were more than 11,500 votes cast, but this year’s number of votes, 22,814, blew the previous record out of the water.

But these things tend to happen when you find creative ways to accumulate votes. For example, students from our second-place finisher, NYU, were instructing people how to vote hundreds and hundreds of times while in class (not that we’ve checked/confirmed this information):

So let’s get down to brass tacks: people are complaining that the lead singer in WVU’s video doesn’t seem to be a law student, and that it goes against the entire spirit of the competition. To be fair to WVU, that wasn’t a part of our contest rules, so no, we’re not going to disqualify them. But do we need to add new rules for next year’s contest? Feel free to give us ideas in the comments.

Of course, additional allegations of cheating have surfaced, as they did in our “law firm with the brightest future” contest. Some NYU partisans claimed that WVU used bots or other prohibited technology to accumulate a massive number of new votes in the final hours of the competition.

If you cheated, you should be ashamed of yourself. Unfortunately, we don’t have a concrete way of determining whether someone cheated or the extent of the cheating. If anyone knows of an online polling tool that is hack-proof, whether free or paid, please email us. (We’ve tried several different polling platforms over the years, and all of them have proven susceptible to gaming.)

In any event, WVU won the whole show this year, by more than 800 votes. Send us your t-shirt sizes (limit five), and we’ll get them out to you.

For those of you who haven’t seen it yet, here is West Virginia’s winning entry:

Congratulations to West Virginia and all the other schools that were selected as finalists. Thanks for participating, and we hope to see more from you next year.

Earlier: Law Revue Video Contest 2013: The Finalists!


comments sponsored by

52 comments (hidden for your protection) Show all comments