Bradley Manning

Next Wednesday, September 18 at 7 p.m., ATL is hosting a free cocktail reception in New York. Our topic will be the tension between laws that encourage individuals to blow the whistle on government wrongdoing and laws that impose the harshest penalties for disclosing secrets. Whether one considers mega-leakers Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden to be heroes or traitors, the legal implications of their cases are undeniably fascinating.

Our special guest will be criminal defense and whistleblower attorney John Howley, who will discuss how the law has been applied in controversial cases from Daniel Ellsberg to Snowden and Manning. Gain an appreciation for the complex ethical issues lawyers face when advising and representing whistleblowers and alleged traitors.

Please join us on September 18 by RSVPing for the reception below:

In addition, ATL is partnering with our friends at Lawline to bring you a fascinating CLE program concerning the recent leaks of U.S. government data. The CLE program will also take place on the 18th, from 5:30 to 7:10 p.m. Register for the CLE here.

The event is sponsored by our friends at Access Data with support from Lateral Link and Learnvest.

There is a tension between laws that encourage individuals to blow the whistle on government wrongdoing and laws that impose the harshest civil and criminal penalties for disclosing secrets. Whether one considers mega-leakers Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden to be heroes or traitors, the legal implications of their cases are undeniably fascinating.

On September 18 at 7 p.m., ATL is hosting a free networking cocktail reception in New York, where we’ll discuss the recent leaks of U.S. government data. Our special guest will be criminal defense and whistleblower attorney John Howley, who will examine how the law has been applied in controversial cases from Daniel Ellsberg to Snowden and Manning. Gain an appreciation for the complex ethical issues lawyers face when advising and representing whistleblowers and alleged traitors.

Please join us on September 18 by RSVPing for the reception below (and/or the pre-reception CLE course that starts at 5:30 p.m.):

The event is sponsored by our friends at Access Data with support from Lateral Link and Learnvest.

There is a tension between laws that encourage individuals to blow the whistle on government wrongdoing and laws that impose the harshest civil and criminal penalties for disclosing secrets. Whether one considers mega-leakers Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden to be heroes or traitors, the legal implications of their cases are undeniably fascinating.

On September 18 at 7 p.m., ATL is hosting a free networking cocktail reception in New York, where we’ll discuss the recent leaks of U.S. government data. Our special guest will be criminal defense and whistleblower attorney John Howley, who will examine how the law has been applied in controversial cases from Daniel Ellsberg to Snowden and Manning. Gain an appreciation for the complex ethical issues lawyers face when advising and representing whistleblowers and alleged traitors.

Please join us on September 18 by RSVPing for the reception below (and/or the pre-reception CLE course that starts at 5:30 p.m.):

The event is sponsored by our friends at Access Data with support from Lateral Link and Learnvest.

There are other teams.

Whether one considers mega-leakers Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden to be courageous heroes or dastardly traitors — apparently there’s no middle view — the legal implications of their cases are undeniably fascinating. There is a tension between one set of laws which encourage individuals to blow the whistle on government wrongdoing, while another set imposes the harshest civil and criminal penalties for disclosing secrets.

ATL has partnered with our friends at Lawline to bring you a fascinating CLE program and networking cocktail reception surrounding the recent leaks of U.S. government data. Criminal defense and whistleblower attorney John Howley will illuminate how these laws have been applied in controversial cases from Daniel Ellsberg to Snowden and Manning. Gain an appreciation for the complex ethical issues lawyers face when advising and representing whistleblowers and alleged traitors.

Please join us for either the CLE course or networking reception on September 18. Or better yet, both.

RSVP for the reception below:

To register for the CLE course, please follow this link.

These events are sponsored by our friends at Cooper & Cooper, LearnVest, and Access Data.

It’s Alito time, Phil! (via Getty Images)

* The NSA has violated the Constitution for years, you say? And it’s been misleading the FISA court about all of its domestic spying activities? As of this moment, the NSA is on double secret probation! [New York Times]

* Imagine how the New York stop-and-frisk case would have turned out if it had been before SCOTUS. The “human toll of unconstitutional stops” may not have been weighed so heavily. [Opinionator / New York Times]

* “[N]o one has a crystal ball,” but right now, it’s highly likely that the Supreme Court will take up another gay marriage case. Perhaps it’ll be the one that’s currently unfolding in Pennsylvania. [Legal Intelligencer]

* According to a recent survey conducted by Randstad, about 60 percent of lawyers are proud to be members of the legal profession, which is impressive(!) considering how unhappy they are. [The Lawyer]

* Birds of a feather really do flock together. Philip Alito, son of Justice Samuel Alito, will join Eugene Scalia, son of Justice Antonin Scalia, at Gibson Dunn’s Washington, D.C. office. [Blog of Legal Times]

* Even though the vast majority of his race-based claims were dismissed on summary judgment, this “token black associate” still has a respected Biglaw firm up against the Ropes. [National Law Journal]

* Law school applications are plummeting, but top law schools haven’t started scraping the bottom of the barrel — their applicants’ LSAT scores have remained relatively competitive. [WSJ Law Blog (sub. req.)]

* I am Chelsea Manning, I am a female.” Considering (s)he was just sentenced to 35 years in prison, Bradley Chelsea Manning picked a great time to make this announcement to the world. [Chicago Tribune]

* You dare call the Duchess of Dumplins racist and sexist? When it comes to Paula Deen’s new legal team from Morgan Lewis, five are women, and four are black. Take that, Lisa Jackson. [Am Law Daily]

Following last month’s verdict, Bradley Manning has now been sentenced.

A military judge found the Army Private First Class — on trial for leaking documents to WikiLeaks — guilty of multiple espionage charges last month, though acquitted Manning on the most serious “we get to kill you now” charge of aiding the enemy.

The government sought 60 years (of a possible 90) in prison.

It fell a tad short…

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Bradley Manning Sentenced”

This is what you could call a slow news week. It’s kind of the exact opposite of the week that inspired me to start writing these missives. Back then, the Supreme Court was handing down rulings and the Zimmerman trial was getting off to a disastrous start for the defense. It all seems so long ago.

The latter days of the summer are always slow in law as partners and judges go on vacation and students await the return to school. The bar exam provides some light entertainment and OCI generally provides a gem or two, but otherwise it’s a slow period.

And that’s when people can get tripped up by satire masquerading as news.

Here’s a short round-up of a few key stories from the week including how satire fooled a lot of the ATL-verse and some high profile cases that had milestone moments…

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Slow News Week of Satire and Ho-Hum Courtroom ‘Drama’”

On Tuesday, Army Colonel Denise Lind found Private First Class Bradley Manning guilty of 17 of 21 counts of charges related to Manning’s leak of some 700,000 classified documents to the website WikiLeaks. (See here for Alexa O’Brien’s helpful graphical summary of the counts and here for Freedom of the Press Foundation’s full trial transcripts.) Although Colonel Lind did not find Manning guilty of charges of “aiding the enemy,” she found him guilty of seven of eight counts of violating the Espionage Act for leaking intelligence “with reason to believe such information could be used to the injury of the U.S. or the advantage of any foreign nation.” Manning was also found guilty of “wrongfully and wantonly” causing to be published on the internet intelligence belonging to the U.S., “having knowledge that intelligence published on the internet is accessible to the enemy.” Sentencing proceedings, which progress rapidly in the military justice system, began Wednesday. Manning faces a possible 136 years in military prison.

Manning’s detailed statement offered to the court martial in February explains how a gawky, barely post-pubescent Army intelligence analyst from Oklahoma came to publicize virtual reams of national security security secrets with which his country had entrusted him. Manning said: “I believed that if the general public, especially the American public, had access to the information contained within [the military’s own databases], it could spark a domestic debate on the role of the military and our foreign policy in general as it related to Iraq and Afghanistan.”

Bradley Manning wanted to spark a debate. Like a high school civics teacher trying to rouse his dozing students, he wanted to get us all talking. See? He’s not a turncoat willing to endanger the lives of Americans or a vainglorious and disgruntled soldier. He’s just a patriotic facilitator of conversation.

Rubbish. Manning’s acts were, at best, absurdly naive, and at worst, paternalistic and hubristic….

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Bradley Manning Thinks He Knows Best: The Hubris of a Leaker”

Bradley Manning’s convictions today include 5 courts of espionage. A very serious new precedent for supplying information the press.

WikiLeaks, reacting on its Twitter feed to the verdict in the court-martial of Pfc. Bradley Manning. Manning was found not guilty of aiding the enemy but guilty of multiple counts of violating the Espionage Act.

* Because the Senate doesn’t work properly when it comes to doing things efficiently, Obama will nominate three candidates for the D.C. Circuit. The outrage! The horror! The court-packing! [Legal Times]

* Howrey going to sue everyone in time to meet this bankruptcy deadline? When you’ve only got a few days left before the statute of limitations expires, you file up to 33 suits per day. [Am Law Daily]

* Attack of the lawyer glut! If you’re a recent law school grad who’s still unemployed, chances are high that this chart detailing the ratio of lawyers to job openings will make you shed a tear. [The Atlantic]

* Tey Tsun Hang, the law professor convicted on corruption charges after having an affair with a student, is heading to jail for five months. Giving out all of that extra credit wasn’t worth it after all. [Bloomberg]

* Nidal Hasan, the accused Fort Hood shooter, will be representing himself in his murder trial. He’ll use a “defense of others” argument, which seems obtuse given the nature of the crime. [Huffington Post]

* Bradley Manning’s court-martial began with a bang, with the prosecution arguing that the young intelligence analyst put lives at risk, while his own attorney called him a “humanist.” [New York Times]

* Jill Kelley, the woman who helped bring about the downfall of General David Petraeus by exposing his affair, has filed a lawsuit against government officials alleging privacy violations of all things. [USA Today]

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