Continuing Legal Education / CLE

* The lawyer who shot himself in the back and lied about it has pleaded guilty since his defense was full of self-inflicted holes. [WBIW]

* Do you want to be a partner? These 12 simple rules are a good start. (Not featured: Rule 13. Have incriminating pictures of the other partners.) [At Counsel Table]

* The University of Vermont and Vermont Law School are considering a joint “3-2″ degree program. So if you’re 18 years old and positive you want to grow up to be a lawyer, you may soon have a lower cost option. You’re also probably a tool. [AP via Boston.com]

* Can introverts be solo practitioners? It’s an interesting question, but since Growth is Dead (affiliate link) notes that even rainmakers are tragically lacking in sociability, it’s likely that most lawyers across firms are introverted. [Lawpolis]

* St. Louis University Law School has taken over and refurbished an old building in downtown St. Louis. See, it’s possible to run a law school without spending money on MOAR BUILDINGS! [Urban Review STL]

* A poem about CLE. Wait, are there people not doing their CLE online? [Poetic Justice]

* How to pick a good divorce lawyer. Done. [Huffington Post]

* Matthew Martens, the senior SEC attorney who ran the “Fabulous Fab” trial, is leaving the agency. Possible landing spots for Martens include Kirkland & Ellis; Paul Weiss; WilmerHale; Latham & Watkins; and Cleary Gottlieb. [Wealth Management]

* A judge in Kentucky moonlights as the PA announcer for high school football games. He’s also blind. Eschewing the obvious “he still sees better than the refs” joke, my question is why isn’t it just more efficient to make his spotter the PA announcer? Video after the jump…

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Public opinion is polarized regarding the mega-leakers Chelsea Manning and Edward Snowden. One common view holds them to be heroic patriots. To others, they’re simply traitors. Prominent whistleblower attorney John Howley asks us to consider the possibility that they can be both at once.

Last week, ATL—along with our friends at Lawline—hosted a fascinating (seriously) and timely CLE course, Whistleblowers, Traitors and the Rule of Law. Howley walked the attendees through the various laws governing whistleblowers, treason, and espionage. He also gave an overview of the most important whistleblower and treason cases, as well as explored the thorny legal and ethical implications for lawyers involved in such cases.

The course was as much a history lesson as a legal one. The role of whistleblower plays an integral part of our national history. In fact, the first American whistleblower law predates the country’s founding. In 1777, sailors accused the commander of the Continental Navy, Commodore Esek Hopkins, of torturing captured British sailors, and petitioned the Continental Congress to remove him. Hopkins sued for criminal libel, and Congress — by unanimous vote — agreed to defend the sailors in the suit. Congress also passed a law requiring all military members to inform Congress of “misconduct, frauds or misdemeanors committed by any officers in the service of these states.”

Many of the most important heroes in American history were, technically, traitors, including the Founding Fathers. And knowingly so. As Benjamin Franklin quipped, “We must hang together or we will hang separately.”

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Next Wednesday, September 18 at 7 p.m., ATL is hosting a free cocktail reception in New York. Our topic will be the tension between laws that encourage individuals to blow the whistle on government wrongdoing and laws that impose the harshest penalties for disclosing secrets. Whether one considers mega-leakers Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden to be heroes or traitors, the legal implications of their cases are undeniably fascinating.

Our special guest will be criminal defense and whistleblower attorney John Howley, who will discuss how the law has been applied in controversial cases from Daniel Ellsberg to Snowden and Manning. Gain an appreciation for the complex ethical issues lawyers face when advising and representing whistleblowers and alleged traitors.

Please join us on September 18 by RSVPing for the reception below:

In addition, ATL is partnering with our friends at Lawline to bring you a fascinating CLE program concerning the recent leaks of U.S. government data. The CLE program will also take place on the 18th, from 5:30 to 7:10 p.m. Register for the CLE here.

The event is sponsored by our friends at Access Data with support from Lateral Link and Learnvest.


There is a tension between laws that encourage individuals to blow the whistle on government wrongdoing and laws that impose the harshest civil and criminal penalties for disclosing secrets. Whether one considers mega-leakers Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden to be heroes or traitors, the legal implications of their cases are undeniably fascinating.

On September 18 at 7 p.m., ATL is hosting a free networking cocktail reception in New York, where we’ll discuss the recent leaks of U.S. government data. Our special guest will be criminal defense and whistleblower attorney John Howley, who will examine how the law has been applied in controversial cases from Daniel Ellsberg to Snowden and Manning. Gain an appreciation for the complex ethical issues lawyers face when advising and representing whistleblowers and alleged traitors.

Please join us on September 18 by RSVPing for the reception below (and/or the pre-reception CLE course that starts at 5:30 p.m.):

The event is sponsored by our friends at Access Data with support from Lateral Link and Learnvest.

Ed. note: This is the latest installment in a series of posts from the ATL Career Center’s team of expert contributors. Today, Sunny Choi shares some advice on ways to save money while fulfilling your CLE requirements.

CLE is one of the many banes of an attorney’s existence. If you’re like me, you’ve probably procrastinated on fulfilling your CLE requirements and the deadline is fast approaching.

As a non-Biglaw attorney, I’ve always had to find my own resources for CLE classes on the cheap. Whether you’re working for a small firm, engaged in your own practice, or working for the government, there are CLE classes available that are either free or relatively inexpensive.

Read on to discover how to get your CLE done without breaking the bank.

Continue reading at the ATL Career Center…

There is a tension between laws that encourage individuals to blow the whistle on government wrongdoing and laws that impose the harshest civil and criminal penalties for disclosing secrets. Whether one considers mega-leakers Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden to be heroes or traitors, the legal implications of their cases are undeniably fascinating.

On September 18 at 7 p.m., ATL is hosting a free networking cocktail reception in New York, where we’ll discuss the recent leaks of U.S. government data. Our special guest will be criminal defense and whistleblower attorney John Howley, who will examine how the law has been applied in controversial cases from Daniel Ellsberg to Snowden and Manning. Gain an appreciation for the complex ethical issues lawyers face when advising and representing whistleblowers and alleged traitors.

Please join us on September 18 by RSVPing for the reception below (and/or the pre-reception CLE course that starts at 5:30 p.m.):

The event is sponsored by our friends at Access Data with support from Lateral Link and Learnvest.

* After three years on top, Baker & McKenzie has lost its place as the top grossing firm in the Global 100. But which firm dethroned the once king? None other than… [Am Law Daily]

* Today we celebrate the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s March on Washington, and yet some of the things he sought to change still remain the same in 2013. [Washington Post]

* The house always wins: Navin Kumar Aggarwal, the ex-K&L Gates partner who stole client funds to pay gambling debts, was jailed after receiving a 12-year sentence. [Am Law Daily]

* “This is like a triple-overtime win.” Merrill Lynch is making a huge $160 million payout in a racial bias case that’s been stuck in the courts for nearly a decade. Congrats, plaintiffs! [DealBook / New York Times]

* As eager young law students return to school, maybe it’s time for you to consider brushing up on the basics. Now is an excellent time to take care of those pesky CLE requirements. [Corporate Counsel]

* Husch Blackwell is teaming up with WUSTL Law to launch a training program for… partners. Take this for what is is, law students: a great opportunity to résumé bomb the hell out of them. [National Law Journal]

* Career alternatives for attorneys: judicial drug mule. Following an investigation by the DEA, a former Utah judge pleaded guilty to the possession of enough Oxycodone to kill a small horse. [Salt Lake Tribune]

* Don’t even think about texting anyone, ever again, in the state of New Jersey, especially if they might be driving, because the appeals court says you could be held liable for negligence. [WSJ Law Blog (sub. req.)]

* Joe Francis of Girls Gone Wild has been sentenced to 270 days in jail and three years’ probation after being convicted of assault and false imprisonment by a jury of “stupid, stupid idiots.” [Los Angeles Times]

There are other teams.

Whether one considers mega-leakers Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden to be courageous heroes or dastardly traitors — apparently there’s no middle view — the legal implications of their cases are undeniably fascinating. There is a tension between one set of laws which encourage individuals to blow the whistle on government wrongdoing, while another set imposes the harshest civil and criminal penalties for disclosing secrets.

ATL has partnered with our friends at Lawline to bring you a fascinating CLE program and networking cocktail reception surrounding the recent leaks of U.S. government data. Criminal defense and whistleblower attorney John Howley will illuminate how these laws have been applied in controversial cases from Daniel Ellsberg to Snowden and Manning. Gain an appreciation for the complex ethical issues lawyers face when advising and representing whistleblowers and alleged traitors.

Please join us for either the CLE course or networking reception on September 18. Or better yet, both.

RSVP for the reception below:

To register for the CLE course, please follow this link.

These events are sponsored by our friends at Cooper & Cooper, LearnVest, and Access Data.

* Eugene Volokh analyzes the free-speech issues raised by the prosecution of Anya Bargh, the UConn law student accused of sending anti-Semitic and racist emails. [Volokh Conspiracy]

* Lawyerist thinks you suck, not the gunners. Discuss. [Lawyerist]

* Law and the Multiverse now has CLE courses about comic books. Maintaining this license just got that much easier. [Law and the Multiverse]

* Some new developments in the Ed O’Bannon case against the NCAA. Basically, discovery has not been kind to the NCAA. [Bloomberg]

* All the editors-in-chief at Michigan Law are women. Now, if another 90 or so journals follow suit, Staci’s article will seem outdated. [Michigan Law]

* Ruh-roh. Did David Boies blow the lid off campaign spending limits last cycle? [Huffington Post]

* No, Mike Bloomberg was not denied a slice of pizza yesterday. [Gawker]

* WARNING: If you understand math, the latest from NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly will annoy the hell out of you. [PrawfsBlawg]

* Man injured in a drunken fight sues the bar that he says should have cut him off. [Overlawyered]

* Yesterday, we shared Paul Caron’s plan to end the sequester by forcing government officials to experience delays due to air traffic control furloughs. Well, Congress voted to end the furloughs. We should have known that once the sequester inconvenienced a member of Congress this would end. [Reuters via Yahoo!]

* Ken Langone does not agree with Richard Farley of Paul Hastings. And tells him so. Loudly. [DealBreaker]

* If you’re looking for CLE credits in Houston, check out this event where you can win a semi-automatic 12-gauge shotgun for your trouble. And it counts for Ethics! [NRA Blog]

* “Izadi suggested she could pay her law school tuition by turning tricks.” Is a pimp really that much worse than Sallie Mae? [Las Vegas Review Journal]

* Overlawyered is now part of the CATO Institute. Enjoy working for the Koch brothers! I hear they’re really easy to work with over there. [Overlawyered]

* Getting tossed from a case for “bad behavior”? That’s the Chicago way! [Chicago Tribune]

* An interview with American Lawyer Editor-in-Chief Robin Sparkman about the newly released Am Law 100 law firm rankings, after the jump….

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