Movies

  • Phoenix_School_of_Law

    Election Law, Law Schools, Movies, New Jersey, Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 06.04.13

    * If you checked out our story about the 3L seemingly taking over the admissions department at Indiana University, head on over again because there’s an update. [Above the Law]

    * Two former professors have sued the Phoenix School of Law for valuing profits over students and faculty. If you can’t trust your local diploma mill, who can you trust? [Connecticut Law Tribune]

    * On June 11, Atlas Obscura is hosting an interesting event called “Go Directly to Jail: Trespassing and the Law.” Ironically, the event requires advanced tickets. [Atlas Obscura]

    * Top myths about law school and the legal profession… from the desk of the dean of Thomas M. Cooley Law School. “Thomas M. Cooley is the second-best law school in the country” is strangely not one of the myths they address. [Cooley Law School Blog]

    * Legal blogging worlds collide when Law and the Multiverse guest posts on Volokh Conspiracy. [Volokh Conspiracy]

    * And while we’re on the subject of Law and the Multiverse, they update their spoiler heavy piece from a few weeks ago about the criminal liability of the Mandarin in Iron Man 3. [Law and the Multiverse]

    * Not much fallout yet, but Chris Christie just set the time for the special election to fill NJ Senator Frank Lautenberg’s seat. As far as I can tell, the date selected fulfills NEITHER of the statutes governing the issue, the relevant portions of which are provided after the jump…

    First, 19:27-6 — Congressional vacancies (emphasis added):

    If the vacancy happens in the representation of this State in the United States Senate the election shall take place at the general election next succeeding the happening thereof, unless the vacancy shall happen within 70 days next preceding the primary election prior to the general election, in which case it shall be filled by election at the second succeeding election, unless the Governor shall deem it advisable to call a special election therefor, which he is authorized hereby to do.

    Meaning the election should take place in November 2014, because we’re already within 70 days of the next primary.

    And then, 19:3-26 — Vacancies in United States senate; election to fill; temporary appointment by governor (emphasis added):

    If a vacancy shall happen in the representation of this State in the United States senate, it shall be filled at the general election next succeeding the happening thereof, unless such vacancy shall happen within 70 days next preceding such election, in which case it shall be filled by election at the second succeeding general election, unless the governor of this State shall deem it advisable to call a special election therefor, which he is authorized hereby to do.

    Meaning the election should take place on the date of the next general election in November.

    October 2013 fits neither of these requirements. Yay for making up law!

    5 Comments / / Jun 4, 2013 at 5:51 PM
  • Sasso_Gary_09

    Ask the Experts, Biglaw, Books, Movies, Partner Issues

    The ATL Interrogatories: 10 Questions with Gary Sasso of Carlton Fields

    Gary Sasso, president and CEO of Carlton Fields, answers 10 questions as part of the ATL Interrogatories.

    / May 31, 2013 at 2:33 PM
  • Hollywood Sign

    Akin Gump, Biglaw, Celebrities, Entertainment Law, Movies, Rankings, Small Law Firms, Women's Issues

    The Hollywood 100: America’s Top Entertainment ‘Power Lawyers’

    Which lawyers were honored on this year’s list? And why are female attorneys so poorly represented?

    3 Comments / / May 23, 2013 at 12:49 PM
  • James Maiwurm RF

    Ask the Experts, Biglaw, Minority Issues, Partner Issues, Technology, Women's Issues

    The ATL Interrogatories: 10 Questions with Jim Maiwurm of Squire Sanders

    Jim Maiwurm of Squire Sanders shares his insights into the legal profession.

    / May 22, 2013 at 2:55 PM
  • Larren Nashelsky RF

    Ask the Experts, Biglaw, Books, Movies, Partner Issues, Pro Bono

    The ATL Interrogatories: 10 Questions with Larren Nashelsky of Morrison & Foerster

    Larren Nashelsky of Morrison & Foerster shares his insights into the legal profession.

    / May 15, 2013 at 2:23 PM
  • gatsby

    2nd Circuit, Bankruptcy, Books, Law Schools, Movies, Non-Sequiturs, Police

    Non-Sequiturs: 05.08.13

    * Professor Alfred Brophy wonders if The Great Gatsby (affiliate link) provides an early preview of product placement. In any event, I’m willing to bet the new movie will provide a stellar latter day view of product placement. [The Faculty Lounge]

    * Brooklyn Law School will begin offering a 2-year JD program. This makes too much sense. [Brooklyn Law School]

    * Former Dora the Explorer star rebuffed in effort to unwind settlement, in part over claims that she overpaid for her lawyer. He charged $755/hour plus a 37.5% “success fee.” This is the sort of thing that happens if a monkey is your most trusted confidant. [Hollywood Reporter]

    * Oreck files for bankruptcy. Not Orrick, Oreck. They make vacuum cleaners that suck. Figuratively. [USA Today]

    * Urinating on police stations? Detroit sounds like such a charming place. [Legal Juice]

    * If you don’t mind spoilers, here are the answers to all your Iron Man 3 legal queries. Not answered: why was the post-credits scene so lame? [Law and the Multiverse]

    * While created for short-sighted criminal defendants, this applies equally to the hubris of civil defendants who are just SURE they’re going to win. [What the Public Defender?]

    * Caroline Kennedy just paid up her lapsed bar admission. Just in time for a Senate confirmation hearing… you know if she were to get nominated for something. [WiseLawNY]

    3 Comments / / May 8, 2013 at 5:40 PM
  • Richard Wiley

    Ask the Experts, Biglaw, Books, FCC, Movies, Partner Issues

    ATL Interrogatories: 10 Questions with Richard Wiley of Wiley Rein LLP

    Richard Wiley of Wiley Rein LLP shares his insights into the legal profession.

    / May 8, 2013 at 3:14 PM
  • techdirt-RF

    Copyright, Intellectual Property, Movies, Technology

    Warner Bros., MGM, Universal Collectively Pull Nearly 2,000 Films From Netflix

    Short-sighted studios are ruining the market for consumers… and themselves.

    / May 3, 2013 at 2:13 PM
  • 220px-Cela

    Intellectual Property, Jury Duty, Law School Deans, Law Schools, Movies, Non-Sequiturs, Prisons, Technology

    Non-Sequiturs: 04.29.13

    * The saddest thing about prisons getting rated on Yelp is owning the bar down the street with fewer stars. [Simple Justice]

    * Sending “LOL totes glty” is a bad idea. [IT-Lex]

    * The chief of the Brooklyn DA’s gang bureau probably should have spent more time with the civil rights bureau. [NY Post]

    * People don’t really pay attention to the U.S. News Best Intellectual Property Program rankings — though it’d help if they did. [Science to Law]

    * UNLV’s Nancy Rapoport thinks law schools are no better than Enron. That sounds about right. [TaxProf Blog]

    * When it comes to the Boston bombings, Logan Beirne answers, “What would George Washington do?” [Reuters]

    * Tenure has put a crimp in the ability of law schools to excel in the ranking system that considers publication. [Ramblings on Appeal]

    * Kickstarter plug: A progressive Yale student took a year off to make a documentary about a conservative activist group, the Tennessee 9-12 Project, to show civility and respect. [Kickstarter]

    2 Comments / / Apr 29, 2013 at 5:25 PM
  • Garth_Brooks-RF

    Entertainment Law, Movies, Music

    Garth Brooks Suit: Having Friends In Low Places Gets You Sued A Lot

    Maybe this is why Garth Brooks more or less disappeared.

    13 Comments / / Apr 17, 2013 at 12:23 PM
  • osnyder RF

    Ask the Experts, Biglaw, Books, Litigators, Movies, Partner Issues

    The ATL Interrogatories: 10 Questions with Orin Snyder of Gibson Dunn & Crutcher

    Orin Snyder of Gibson Dunn shares his insights and experiences about the legal profession and careers in law.

    / Apr 10, 2013 at 1:05 PM
  • 3rd Circuit, Biglaw, Books, Fashion, Federal Judges, Judicial Nominations, Money, Movies, New Jersey, Non-Sequiturs, U.S. Attorneys Offices, Women's Issues

    Non-Sequiturs: 04.09.13

    * Congratulations to Judge Patty Shwartz on her confirmation to the Third Circuit. She will be sorely missed in the District Court — especially by Judge Hochberg. [People for the American Way]

    * And congrats to another alum of my former office, Michael Martinez, who just joined Mayer Brown as a litigation partner. [Mayer Brown]

    * “Sometimes the women partners make jokes about men. He forces himself to laugh at the jokes like he doesn’t care, and in the beginning he didn’t care….” [Ms. JD]

    * Speaking of objectification, you’ve waited years for this: “The Cast of 12 Angry Men in Order of Hotness.” [The Awl]

    * Uganda hates gays, and now they hate miniskirts. God only knows what they’d do to gays in miniskirts. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Two things our readers love: compensation porn and rankings. Which universities pay the highest faculty salaries? [TaxProf Blog]

    * Another Yale Law School graduate turned writer: congrats to Steph Cha, whose new novel, Follow Her Home (affiliate link), just got a favorable review in the Los Angeles Times. [Los Angeles Times]

    0 Comments / / Apr 9, 2013 at 5:21 PM
  • 250px-Roger_Ebert_(extract)_by_Roger_Ebert-RF

    Alex Kozinski, Antonin Scalia, Movies

    Roger Ebert and the Law: Coming to a Law School Near You

    Roger Ebert really didn’t like legal movies all that much.

    13 Comments / / Apr 8, 2013 at 3:46 PM
  • 230px-AtTheMovies

    Abortion, Affirmative Action, Antitrust, Baseball, Basketball, Crime, Deaths, Law Professors, Movies, Non-Sequiturs, Sports

    Non-Sequiturs: 04.04.13

    * Roger Ebert has died at the age of 70. A great critic (his audio commentary track on the Citizen Kane DVD is amazing), whose work with the late Gene Siskel basically defined film criticism for a generation. At least now we know how we will be judged when we die — a simple thumbs up, thumbs down from Gene and Roger. [Chicago Sun-Times]

    * Exploring the link between baseball’s antitrust exemption and Roe v. Wade. It’s more than just saying the Royals are an abortion of a team. [Concurring Opinions]

    * “Bring me the head of the person who did this”: the best closing to a C & D letter ever. [Popehat]

    * A Rutgers-Camden 3L breaks down the looming sh*tstorm at Rutgers over basketball coach Mike Rice’s treatment of players. [The Legal Blitz]

    * If you’ve pulled off a successful robbery, don’t taunt the victim from a traceable phone. I mean, act like you’ve been there before, man. [Legal Juice]

    * It is a little funny to say that a city is looking for weaker swimmers to serve as lifeguards, but ultimately this represents the simplistic nature of the anti-affirmative-action argument: no one is saying lifeguards shouldn’t be qualified, just that a system that only privileges a strong swimming résumé will always result in affluent white kids with 10 years of swim classes getting these jobs. [Volokh Conspiracy]

    * Lawyers are often jerks, but this is a new twist. Help out a lawyer trying to make it in the small-batch, artisan jerky business.[Kickstarter]

    * Maybe there aren’t actual Commies at Harvard Law School, but the ratio of liberals to conservatives/libertarians on the faculty is still extremely high. [Nick Rosenkranz]

    5 Comments / / Apr 4, 2013 at 5:06 PM
  • don lents bryan cave

    Ask the Experts, Biglaw, Books, Movies, Partner Issues

    The ATL Interrogatories: 10 Questions with Don Lents of Bryan Cave

    Don Lents, chair of Bryan Cave, shares his insights and experiences about the legal profession and careers in law, as well as about his firm and himself.

    / Apr 3, 2013 at 2:06 PM
  • techdirt-RF

    Copyright, Intellectual Property, Movies, Technology, Television

    Arrested Development Documentary Has To Hit Up Kickstarter Because of Copyright Issues

    Is Fox being overly aggressive in its copyright claims?

    / Mar 29, 2013 at 12:45 PM
  • Reed Smith's new managing partner?

    Anthony Kennedy, Antitrust, BARBRI, Biglaw, Clarence Thomas, Fast Food, Food, Kids, Morning Docket, Movies, Partner Issues, SCOTUS, Stephen Breyer, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 03.15.13

    * “We are a teaching institution. We teach by not having television. We are judged by what we write.” Justices Kennedy and Breyer aren’t ready for their close-ups — they’re adamantly opposed to cameras in the courtroom. [Blog of Legal Times]

    * Another thing Justices Kennedy and Breyer are adamantly opposed to is the sequester. They say that these unnecessary budget cuts will hit the criminal justice system where it hurts: its already overflowing docket. [WSJ Law Blog (sub. req.)]

    * A liberal film critic took a shot at Justice Clarence Thomas by likening him to Samuel L. Jackson’s portrayal of the head house slave in Django Unchained. Methinks this is a RACEIST™ comparison, n’est–ce pas? [Reason Magazine]

    * Reed Smith has a new managing partner, Edward Estrada, who plans to “aggressively recruit laterals.” No relation to Erik Estrada, but if he gets a pair of those cool sunglasses, we approve. [New York Law Journal]

    * A better deal was reached in the BAR/BRI antitrust case. Say goodbye to the coupons, and hello to $9.5 million in cold hard cash… which means you’re going to get like $80 if you’re lucky. [National Law Journal]

    * “This is a very disgusting case.” Why yes, yes it is. A mother is suing because she claims her son ate a used condom off the floor of a McDonald’s play area. It’s doubtful that she approved of the special sauce. [Reuters]

    3 Comments / / Mar 15, 2013 at 9:04 AM
  • movie slate

    Bloomberg, Career Alternatives, Movies, Videos, YouTube

    Career Alternatives for Attorneys: Filmmaker

    Why be a lawyer when you can make movies about law instead?

    1 Comment / / Feb 27, 2013 at 3:30 PM