• prison prisoner jail convicted criminal

    California, Crime, Politics, Prisons, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    The Consequences of Brown v. Plata Are Nothing to Dismiss: The California Prison Case Continues

    Releasing criminal offenders into mainstream society to avoid prison overcrowding means . . . increasing the number of criminal offenders in mainstream society.

    56 Comments / / Oct 17, 2013 at 11:41 AM
  • Dzhokhar Tsarnaev

    Barack Obama, Biglaw, Constitutional Law, Entertainment Law, Federal Judges, General Counsel, Kasowitz Benson, Law Professors, Money, Morning Docket, Prisons, Women's Issues

    Morning Docket: 10.04.13

    * “We’re in uncharted territory right now.” The federal courts made it through the first week of the shutdown, but they’re approaching “here be dragons” land in terms of funding. [National Law Journal]

    * “It would be the most interesting case in decades.” Legal experts (read: law professors from T14s) debate whether President Obama can ignore the debt ceiling for much longer. [New York Times]

    * People are getting out of Biglaw while the getting’s good. Reed Smith’s global managing partner is leaving the firm for a general counsel gig after 13 years at the helm. [WSJ Law Blog (sub. req.)]

    * Law firm leaders met to discuss how to empower women attorneys, and agreed it’s wise to parade them around in front of clients. Getting to work on those clients’ cases is another question. [Blog of Legal Times]

    * No debacles here, contrary to past precedent: Kasowitz Benson poached two superior legal minds from NBCUniversal and welcomed them to the firm to open an entertainment litigation practice. [Bloomberg]

    * Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s lawyers want their client’s prison restrictions to be lifted and are raising a slew of constitutional claims. We think the members of his fan club are the only ones feeling sorry for him. [CNN]

    3 Comments / / Oct 4, 2013 at 9:13 AM
  • 404 error

    Attorney Misconduct, Biglaw, Blackberry-Crackberry, Cars, Law Schools, Legal Ethics, Morning Docket, Paul Bergrin, Prisons, SCOTUS, Securities Law, Supreme Court, Technology

    Morning Docket: 09.24.13

    * A study revealed that almost half of all links in online Supreme Court opinions are dead, but at least internet pranksters like this guy have been given a chance in the spotlight. [New York Times]

    * CHECK YOU [BLACKBERRIES] OFTEN, because firms like Shearman & Sterling, McCarthy Tétrault, Skadden Arps, and Torys will advise on the ancient technology’s private sale. [Am Law Daily]

    * We hope this IPO isn’t imported from Detroit. Chrysler filed a prospectus with the SEC yesterday with the help of attorneys from Sullivan & Cromwell and Cravath. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * Paul Bergrin, more commonly known as the “Baddest Lawyer in the History of Jersey,” was handed a life sentence yesterday. At least he’ll have street cred with his gen pop friends. [WSJ Law Blog (sub. req.)]

    * If you’re still thinking of applying to law school now, you must be the kind of person who needs advice on how to go to college and fill out applications, all at the same time. [Law Admissions Lowdown / U.S. News]

    0 Comments / / Sep 24, 2013 at 9:08 AM
  • dbi

    Associate Advice, Jon Stewart, Movies, Non-Sequiturs, Patents, Prisons, Privacy, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    Non-Sequiturs: 09.17.13

    * Overrated: Government surveillance is out of control. Underrated: Government spending massive amounts of money making the Army’s Intelligence and Security Command look like the set of Star Trek: The Next Generation is out of control. [Lowering the Bar]

    * Helen Wan explains “The 5 Rules Every New Associate Must Know.” Not included: learning all the technical details required to convincingly say your smartphone failed to get that 1 a.m. message. [The Careerist]

    * Another post in the fascinating series about creating visual maps of Supreme Court doctrine. It’s like a nerdier version of the The Atlas of Middle-Earth(affiliate link). [PrawfsBlawg]

    * Ilya Somin reviews the Supreme Court’s most recent Takings Clause jurisprudence. It’s a lot harder for the government to take your property away. But don’t worry, it’s still really easy to lose all your property to unregulated markets. [The Volokh Conspiracy]

    * The Office of the Solicitor General may have inadvertently helped out Frederick Oberlander and Richard Lerner, the two lawyers charged with criminal contempt for talking about a cooperator’s sentence (if you can call a $25,000 fine for admitting to a $40 million fraud a “sentence”) that the feds claim was sealed. [Wise Law NY]

    * A somewhat sad art show based on requests from prisoners in solitary. Some beautiful stuff here. Though I’d have expected more “Rita Hayworth” photo requests. [Gawker]

    * The Daily Show takes on biotech patents. Video after the jump…

    1 Comment / / Sep 17, 2013 at 5:03 PM
  • 220px-Jesse_Jackson,_Jr.,_official_photo_portrait

    Bill Clinton, Non-Sequiturs, Prisons, Television, United Kingdom / Great Britain

    Non-Sequiturs: 08.14.13

    * Former Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. is heading to prison in Alabama for 30 months. Among the items he improperly purchased with campaign funds was a cape. How awesome is that? [Reuters via Yahoo! News]

    * The Bureau of Prisons is planning to move its female inmates out of Danbury to convert it to a men’s prison. The author behind Orange Is the New Black has a different plan. [Jezebel]

    * Reminiscent of the gun post a while back, more proof that women have all kinds of room to store contraband. [Legal Juice]

    * Simpson Thacher lawyers reached some “unsettling conclusions” about the Clinton Foundation. Probably spending too much time with that Lewinsky Foundation. [New York Times]

    * You thought there was animosity toward lawyers in the U.S.? Check out how much they hate them across the pond. [Legal Cheek]

    * What do you get if you combine a lawyer with a paramedic? [The Ambulance Chaser]

    7 Comments / / Aug 14, 2013 at 5:01 PM
  • 220px-Cela

    Intellectual Property, Jury Duty, Law School Deans, Law Schools, Movies, Non-Sequiturs, Prisons, Technology

    Non-Sequiturs: 04.29.13

    * The saddest thing about prisons getting rated on Yelp is owning the bar down the street with fewer stars. [Simple Justice]

    * Sending “LOL totes glty” is a bad idea. [IT-Lex]

    * The chief of the Brooklyn DA’s gang bureau probably should have spent more time with the civil rights bureau. [NY Post]

    * People don’t really pay attention to the U.S. News Best Intellectual Property Program rankings — though it’d help if they did. [Science to Law]

    * UNLV’s Nancy Rapoport thinks law schools are no better than Enron. That sounds about right. [TaxProf Blog]

    * When it comes to the Boston bombings, Logan Beirne answers, “What would George Washington do?” [Reuters]

    * Tenure has put a crimp in the ability of law schools to excel in the ranking system that considers publication. [Ramblings on Appeal]

    * Kickstarter plug: A progressive Yale student took a year off to make a documentary about a conservative activist group, the Tennessee 9-12 Project, to show civility and respect. [Kickstarter]

    2 Comments / / Apr 29, 2013 at 5:25 PM
  • medium_yeti-dvd

    Law Professors, Law Schools, Prisons, Religion, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, UVA Law, Women's Issues

    Non-Sequiturs: 03.08.13

    * Nepal had actual regulations regarding Yeti killing. When will America join the international community and enact strict protections for Sasquatch? [Lowering the Bar]

    * A state bar association is actively discouraging students from going to law school. Which is odd, since the state in question has a top five law school… according to National Jurist. [Associate’s Mind]

    * A clever Civ Pro class used the system against Howard Wasserman to get an extension on their assignment. I respect Wasserman for crediting the students’ ingenuity, but it would have been a better life lesson if he’d impleaded the Dean for forcing him to have grades in early. Or at least ding the students with a Rule 11 claim. [PrawfsBlawg]

    * Inmate forgotten for 22 months in solitary confinement wins $15.5 million reward. Hopefully he’ll be ready in time to protect us from that bioweapon attack from Alcatraz. [CNN]

    * In honor of International Women’s Day, enjoy an interview of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. [The New Yorker]

    * To follow up on an old story, law grad/convicted sex criminal Chris Dumler is reporting to jail today. [WVIR]

    * The Conclave is now set for Tuesday. Place your bets on the new pontiff now! [CNN]

    3 Comments / / Mar 8, 2013 at 5:14 PM
  • 250px-United_States_Capitol_west_front_edit2

    D.C. Circuit, Department of Justice, Eric Holder, Jury Duty, Politics, Prisons

    Next Week, Congress Will Ruin The Country In The Following Ways

    The sequester is going to be one big disaster muffin. How will it screw up the legal profession? Pretty badly actually.

    28 Comments / / Feb 22, 2013 at 2:58 PM
  • Billable Hours, Copyright, Football, Intellectual Property, Non-Sequiturs, Sports, Technology

    Non-Sequiturs: 02.19.13

    * A new lawsuit asks, “Who owns Sherlock Holmes?” That sounds like a mystery suitable for… ugh, I can’t bring myself to finish that gag. [Courthouse News Service]

    * The well-oiled train wreck that is the NCAA finds itself in hot water for ignoring legal advice and going after Miami using privileged information. Lawyers are often maligned by non-lawyers, so let’s enjoy this article from a sports columnist explaining why lawyers can be awesome. [EDSBS]

    * There’s a new iTunes app to keep track of your hours! I’m assuming it has a Biglaw feature to pad hours. [Herald Online]

    * A trilogy of articles about California’s prison “realignment,” described as “The Best Trilogy Since Star Wars.” I’m certainly hoping this isn’t a reference to Episodes I-III. [PrawfsBlawg]

    * The previously discussed proposal to allow Arizonans to bypass law school and take the bar exam has been cut down. It was always ironic that the state most wrapped up in “they took our jobs!” rhetoric wanted to open the legal profession to everyone. [Verde Independent]

    * The third in an ongoing series of posts covering the trial of DC superhero Firestorm. Too bad he doesn’t have that split personality defense to fall back on. For the three of you who got that joke, you’re welcome. [Law and the Multiverse]

    2 Comments / / Feb 19, 2013 at 5:31 PM
  • Ann Althouse, Contests, Federal Government, Non-Sequiturs, Parties, Prisons, Technology, U.S. Attorneys Offices

    Non-Sequiturs: 02.06.13

    * Former Biglaw associate Tabber Benedict, whom we’ve mentioned before (in happier times), reportedly threw a lavish “going away” party — going away to prison, that is. [Daily Mail]

    * Take your pick: is government an “impetuous vortex” or a “hideous monster [with] devouring jaws”? [Althouse]

    * Some thoughts from Juan Haines, a current San Quentin inmate and jailhouse lawyer, on wrongful conviction. [Life of the Law]

    * In defense of the weekly meeting. [What About Clients?]

    * Prosecutors: above the (traffic) law? []

    * And how about the U.S. Postal Service? [Felix Salmon]

    * The furor over U.S. Attorney Carmen Ortiz and the late Aaron Swartz shows no sign of abating. [How Appealing]

    * Speaking of technology law, how would you like to win $5,000? If so, check out this contest. [IT-Lex]

    2 Comments / / Feb 6, 2013 at 5:01 PM
  • middle finger lights

    ACLU, Antonin Scalia, Bernie Madoff, Biglaw, Crime, Deaths, Federal Judges, Football, Free Speech, Law Schools, Mergers and Acquisitions, Morning Docket, Partner Issues, Prisons, Robert Bork, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, SCOTUS, Sentencing Law, State Judges, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 12.21.12

    * Seven out of nine sitting Supreme Court justices were silent when it came to the passing of Robert Bork. Justice Antonin Scalia, of course, issued a public statement, as did liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (surprise!). [WSJ Law Blog (sub. req.)]

    * No one ever really doubted that it would take an army of Biglaw lawyers from the likes of Sullivan & Cromwell, Shearman & Sterling, and Wachtel Lipton to handle a monumental deal like the proposed $8.2 billion NYSE/ICE merger. [Am Law Daily]

    * Can you coach with Nick Saban and be a Miller Canfield partner at the same time? No. But you can sue (and win!) when the firm allegedly forces you out due to its “culture of fear and intimidation.” [Detroit Free Press]

    * Justice Rolando Acosta, who wrote the opinion upholding the dismissal of the class action case against NYLS, rates well among his peers as a nominee for the New York Court of Appeals. [New York Law Journal]

    * Peter Madoff was sentenced to ten years in prison for his role in Bernie Madoff’s Ponzi scheme, but the judge will probably let him go to his granddaughter’s bat mitzvah before shipping him to the pokey. [Bloomberg]

    * Merry Christmas, now go f**k yourself. A federal judge has given a woman in Louisiana free rein to display holiday lights on her roof in the form of an extended middle finger. God bless America. [CBS 3 Springfield]

    7 Comments / / Dec 21, 2012 at 9:07 AM
  • bride holding a bouquet

    2nd Circuit, ACLU, Biglaw, China, Insider Trading, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Prisons, Religion, Sentencing Law, Solo Practitioners, State Judges, State Judges Are Clowns, Student Loans, Weddings

    Morning Docket: 12.05.12

    * Mirror, mirror, on the wall, which is the fairest firm of them all? According to the 2012 Acritas Brand Index survey, the current leader of the Global 100 is the most powerful Biglaw brand for the fifth year in a row. [American Lawyer]

    * But that might not last for long, considering the dilemma Baker & McKenzie is facing when it comes to joining the Shanghai Bar Association in China. The firm is one of the first to indicate that it’ll take the plunge. [Wall Street Journal]

    * Thanks to the Second Circuit, Rajat Gupta will be a free man on bail pending the appeal of his insider trading conviction. We wonder what Benula Bensam would have to say about this new twist. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * Jason Smiekel, the lawyer who pleaded guilty in a murder-for-hire plot involving a former client, was sentenced to eight and a half years in federal prison. The things men will do for HHHBs. [Chicago Tribune]

    * Student loan payments: coming to a paycheck deduction near you! Congress is considering an overhaul of the country’s student debt collection practices, and Rep. Tom Petri has some interesting ideas. [Bloomberg]

    * The Cleveland-Marshall College of Law is the latest school to hop aboard the solo practice incubator train, but graduates will have to rent their office space from the school. Nice. /sarcasm [National Law Journal]

    * “We didn’t file this complaint lightly.” Sorry, Judge Norman, but as it turns out, you can’t just sentence a teenager to attend church for 10 years as a condition of parole without pissing off the ACLU. [Tulsa World]

    * When your alterations cost more than your wedding gown, it’s pretty much a given that you’ll have some problems — ones worth suing over, if you’re a true bridezilla (like moi). [Thomson Reuters News & Insight]

    3 Comments / / Dec 5, 2012 at 9:07 AM
  • prison prisoner jail convicted criminal

    Biglaw, Crime, Prisons, Sentencing Law

    Law Firm Associates and Federal Prisoners: A Comparative Analysis

    How does doing time in Biglaw compare to life behind bars? There are more similarities than you might think.

    18 Comments / / Nov 13, 2012 at 5:35 PM
  • Crime, Federal Judges, Minority Issues, Non-Sequiturs, Prisons, State Judges

    Non-Sequiturs: 11.02.12

    * As a tipster wrote, “This judge done lost her mind.” We don’t know about that, but something is clearly wrong here. [Chicago Sun-Times]

    * Another brutal — yet disarmingly tender — takedown of the bros who run IsAnybodyDown. [Popehat]

    * Robert Morton Duncan, the first black justice of the Ohio Supreme Court, RIP. [Times Union]

    * Yes, clients can be royal pains in the behind. But you still can’t hit an obnoxious client over the head with a baseball bat. [Charleston Gazette]

    * Major Kudos to McGuireWoods for the firm’s support of Hurricane Sandy relief efforts. We encourage other firms (and individuals) to do the same. [American Red Cross]

    * “As American as the modern prison system” doesn’t have the same ring as “apple pie.” For better or worse, though, it’s equally true. [Cruel and Unusual]

    * LawDingo is a new company that connects potential clients with lawyers — all from the convenience of home. It’s the way of the future! [Dow Jones]

    1 Comment / / Nov 2, 2012 at 5:48 PM
  • 'If there's one thing America needs, it's more lawyers!'

    7th Circuit, Gay, Gay Marriage, Google / Search Engines, Non-Sequiturs, Prisons, Privacy, Richard Posner

    Non-Sequiturs: 09.28.12

    * Bank robber tuned jailhouse lawyer turned successful author, Shon Hopwood, is now in law school — on scholarship. Second chances FTW. [Seattle Times]

    * As Hopwood transitions from inmate to law student, another would-be lawyer’s career is going the other direction. One of Reema Bajaj’s classmates is headed to the slammer. [Daily Herald]

    * Damon Thibodeaux is the 300th person in the U.S. to be exonerated on DNA evidence. The Louisiana death row inmate was exonerated after 15 years behind bars. Oy. [Washington Post]

    * Apparently this is the jailhouse edition of Non-Sequiturs, so here’s Judge Richard Posner expounding upon prison rats, damp, dark cells, and the concept of the Bubonic Plague in jail. Heavy s**t, man. [How Appealing]

    * Lionel Hutz is a wonderfully terrible cartoon lawyer, but God help the client who ends up with a real-life version. [RocketLawyer]

    * A trip down the substantially creepy rabbit hole wherein Chevron’s Ecuador litigation, Google, and concerns about electronic privacy all converge. [Opinio Juris]

    * Add Maryland to the list of states sending gay marriage to the ballot box. [Daily Beast]

    7 Comments / / Sep 28, 2012 at 5:03 PM
  • Errol Morris

    Books, Crime, Movies, Murder, Police

    An Interview With Oscar-Winner Errol Morris, Author of ‘A Wilderness of Error’

    Christopher Danzig talks with Oscar-winning filmmaker Errol Morris, who wrote a new book about the famous Jeffrey MacDonald murder case.

    4 Comments / / Sep 10, 2012 at 6:45 PM
  • Kosilek and Justice Ginsburg: Separated at birth?

    Federal Judges, Gender, Murder, Prisons, Quote of the Day

    Quote of the Day: 21st Century Gender Dysphoria Man

    A federal judge ordered Massachusetts to pay for a convicted murderer’s gender reassignment surgery.

    31 Comments / / Sep 4, 2012 at 5:56 PM
  • unemployed lawyer

    Attorney Misconduct, Books, California, Law Schools, Legal Ethics, Military / Military Law, Morning Docket, Murder, Prisons, Texas, Unemployment

    Morning Docket: 08.31.12

    * These are some sad times in Texas, y’all. It really hasn’t been a very good week for the Lone Star state in the courts. First their redistricting plan got thrown out, and now their voter ID law has been struck down. [CNN]

    * Jeh Johnson of the Defense Department may take legal action against the former Navy SEAL who wrote a book about the Osama bin Laden raid, calling it a “material breach” of duty. Must be good; go buy it! [CBS News]

    * Bros will be bros: disbarment has been recommended for an attorney who failed to disclose to clients that he had been suspended for banging an underage chick who worked at his office. [National Law Journal]

    * Here are 15 Northeast law schools ranked by employment rate. After getting excited that mine was on the list — albeit dead last — I realized I’m seriously a low expectation havin’ motherf**ker. [Boston Business Journal]

    * George W. Huguely V, the UVA lacrosse player who beat his girlfriend to death, was sentenced to 23 years in prison. Distasteful joke alert: for his sake, we hope the prison uniforms have poppable collars. [Bloomberg]

    * A Maryland lawyer with autism and Sensory Processing Disorder has created a way for people to stop getting up in your personal space while riding public transportation. Say hello to the Sensory Shield! [Huffington Post]

    4 Comments / / Aug 31, 2012 at 9:13 AM