SCOTUS

  • unemployed-law-grad

    10th Circuit, Free Speech, Google / Search Engines, Job Searches, Law School Deans, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Patents, Richard Posner, SCOTUS, Southern New England School of Law/Umass, Supreme Court, Technology, Unemployment, Wall Street

    Morning Docket: 06.08.12

    * Only 44% of Americans approve of how the Supreme Court is doing its job, but that’s probably because the other 56% wouldn’t know what the Supreme Court was unless the justices were contestants on a reality show. [New York Times]

    * Having nothing to do with the outcome of this Tenth Circuit appeal, apparently a juror in the underlying case had no idea when the First Amendment was adopted. As Bush II would say, is our children learning? [U.S. Tenth Circuit / FindLaw]

    * Who’s going to win the “Super Bowl” of Android patent trials? Nobody. Judge Richard Posner has issued a “tentative” order which noted that both sides of the Apple/Google case ought to be dismissed. [Reuters]

    * You should’ve “known better”: in case we didn’t make it abundantly clear when we spoke about NALP’s data for the class of 2011, the job market for new law grads is being classified as “brutal.” [National Law Journal]

    * U. Chicago Law revolutionized the field of law and economics, but much to their school’s, everyone else copied them. Now they’re thinking up new ways to do the same things. Gunners gotta gun. [Businessweek]

    * Say hello to Mary Lu Bilek, the woman who’s been appointed as the new dean of UMass Law. Hopefully she’s not keen on using school credit cards for personal spending like the last dean. [Wall Street Journal]

    * Occupy Wall Street protesters can’t sue NYC, its mayor, or its police commissioner, but they can sue the police. And with that news, “F**k tha Police” was sung in drum circles across the tri-state area. [Bloomberg]

    1 Comment / / Jun 8, 2012 at 9:05 AM
  • Which firm will be next?

    Alan Dershowitz, Antitrust, Baseball, Biglaw, Bill Clinton, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Football, Heller Ehrman, Howrey LLP, Law Professors, Morning Docket, Paul Clement, S.D.N.Y., State Judges, Texas, Trials

    Morning Docket: 06.07.12

    * You know what’s really got to suck hard? Turning down a Supreme Court nomination to be governor, and then losing your gubernatorial re-election bid. Mario Cuomo is the Bad Luck Brian of our time. [New York Daily News]

    * And speaking of bad luck, this prominent antitrust lawyer is like the harbinger of Biglaw doom. In the last four years, Marc Schildkraut has bounced from Heller to Howrey to Dewey. Good luck to his new firm, Cooley LLP. [Washingtonian]

    * Another judge — this time from the S.D.N.Y. — has found that the Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional. Paul Clement, the patron saint of conservative causes, is probably facepalming right now. [Reuters]

    * Judge Jed Rakoff “politely” benchslapped a Cardozo Law student for playing pen pal over his evidentiary rulings in the Rajat Gupta insider trading trial. Time to get a new hobby, girl. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * “I don’t know how you all practice law in Texas.” It looks like the judge presiding over the Roger Clemens case hasn’t been keeping up with all of our crazy stories from the Lone Star state. [Wall Street Journal]

    * “[T]he epitome of unprofessionalism”: State Attorney Angela Corey couldn’t take the heat from Harvard Law professor Alan Dershowitz, so she threatened to sue the school and get him disbarred. [Orlando Sentinel]

    * “What did you guys do to deserve me? How did you guys get stuck with this? Ay yi yi.” At least Jerry Sandusky’s got a sense of humor about a potential 500 year sentence. [Thomson Reuters News & Insight]

    * The election outlook for birthers may not be so bleak after all. Sure, Orly Taitz lost her bid to be a senator, but Gary Kreep might get to be a judge in San Diego County. We’ll find out later today. [North County Times]

    10 Comments / / Jun 7, 2012 at 9:05 AM
  • I wonder if David Beckham jumps out of her birthday cake?

    Crime, Free Speech, Masturbation, Non-Sequiturs, Sex, Technology, United Kingdom / Great Britain

    Non-Sequiturs: 06.04.12

    * For some reason, the Supreme Court has hardly ruled on any of the First Amendment cases before it this term. Cue the Twilight Zone theme.[PrawfsBlawg]

    * New strategy for closing the gender gap: stop relying on mentors so much. Because, you know, Jack Donaghy can only do so much before Liz Lemon has to start figuring stuff out on her own. [Careerist]

    * He’s not saying your antivirus software is useless, it’s just not exactly useful. [Volokh Conspiracy]

    * Happy Diamond Jubilee to that elderly English lady who wears big, old-fashioned hats and is always politely waving to large crowds. [Charon QC via Blawg Review]

    * A man stole a $4,000 gold plated vibrator, but he forgot to nab the charger. Nothing to see here, folks. Move along. [Legal Juice]

    * What not to do in a judge’s chambers. [Greedy Associates]

    1 Comment / / Jun 4, 2012 at 5:56 PM
  • Supreme-Court-SCOTUS-photo-by-David-Lat1

    Clarence Thomas, Constitutional Law, SCOTUS, Stephen Breyer, Supreme Court, Tax Law

    The Waiting Is The Hardest Part

    It’s time to hurry up and wait for some of the more exciting Supreme Court opinions to be issued.

    13 Comments / / Jun 4, 2012 at 4:32 PM
  • Lawyer-of-the-Month

    Biglaw, Contests, Cozen O'Connor, Depositions, Lawyer of the Day, Reader Polls, Rudeness, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Texas, Women's Issues

    Lawyer of the Month: May Reader Poll

    Who should be May’s Lawyer of the Month? There are some great choices. Cast your vote now!

    8 Comments / / Jun 1, 2012 at 10:05 AM
  • 'F**k this f**king sh*tty bonus!'

    ACLU, Biglaw, Bonuses, Clarence Thomas, Copyright, Department of Justice, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Gay Marriage, John Edwards, Lambda Legal, Morning Docket, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Trials

    Morning Docket: 05.31.12

    * “Our assets went home every night, until one night, they went home and never came back.” Aww, Dewey shed a tear for this bankrupt law firm? Nah. [Thomson Reuters News & Insight]

    * It looks like SCOTUS Justice Clarence Thomas decided to kiss and make up with his alma mater, Yale Law School. He’ll be the keynote speaker at an alumni dinner in D.C. this summer. [Reuters]

    * And the marriage equality battle has finally arrived in Obama’s former stomping grounds. Lambda Legal and the ACLU are challenging the ban on gay marriage in Illinois. [Associated Press]

    * The biggest news out of the John Edwards trial yesterday was that Judge Eagles told the alternate jurors they didn’t have to show up anymore. OMG, boring. Give us a verdict already. [ABC News]

    * Kim Dotcom and his company’s defense against the DOJ’s charges is coming together piece by piece. If only Megaupload were a torrent site, this would be a much better nerd joke. [Media Decoder / New York Times]

    * The ABA Journal wants to know if you curse in the workplace, and if so, in what situations. We bet that a fair share of Biglaw associates were dropping f-bombs left and right over this year’s bonuses. [ABA Journal]

    2 Comments / / May 31, 2012 at 9:04 AM
  • Really, judge? Really?

    9th Circuit, Bankruptcy, Biglaw, Canada, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Dissolution, Football, John Edwards, JPMorgan Chase, Kids, Morning Docket, Police, Politics, Pregnancy / Paternity, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Trials

    Morning Docket: 05.30.12

    * Dewey have any cash to pay the people helping to wind down our firm’s business? Nope! Even though JPMorgan backed D&L’s $8.6M motion to fund the firm’s ongoing operations, Judge Glenn insisted that the bank “[r]oll [its] truck up and start collecting accounts receivable.” [Am Law Daily (reg. req.)]

    * “Don’t tase my baby, bro!” SCOTUS has declined to review a case where the Ninth Circuit ruled that the use of a Taser on a seven-month pregnant woman constituted excessive force. [Thomson Reuters News & Insight]

    * “The jury has sent a note that they’ve reached… [dramatic pause] … a good stopping point.” Judicial humor lightened the mood after the seventh day of deliberations without a verdict in the John Edwards trial. [ABC News]

    * Dharun Ravi finally issued an apology for his “stupid and childish” behavior, and he’ll be heading off to serve his 30-day jail sentence on Thursday. And you know, that jail sentence is joke enough for this blurb. [CNN]

    * “Dumb Blonde” isn’t a name that Elizabeth Warren takes too kindly to being called. She much prefers the name that her Native American ancestors bestowed upon her: “Running Joke.” [San Francisco Chronicle]

    * Four of the alleged victims in the Jerry Sandusky case have asked the court to protect their identities. It’s kind of like the Michael Jackson case, but everyone cares more because this one involves football. [Bloomberg]

    * Hundreds of lawyers, notaries, and other legal professionals took to the streets in Montreal earlier this week to publicly protest Bill 78, a law that limits public protests. That’s so meta, eh Canadians? [Montreal Gazette]

    5 Comments / / May 30, 2012 at 9:10 AM
  • Supreme-Court-SCOTUS-photo-by-David-Lat1

    Bankruptcy, Holidays and Seasons, Nina Totenberg, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    Summer Comes to One First Street

    The day after Memorial Day was a slow day at the Supreme Court…

    11 Comments / / May 29, 2012 at 2:00 PM
  • A brothel babe from down under?

    Bankruptcy, Biglaw, Cars, Cellphones, Department of Justice, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Drugs, Facebook, Health Care / Medicine, Immigration, Law Schools, Morning Docket, New Jersey, Pets, Plaintiffs Firms, Politics, Prostitution, SCOTUS, Securities Law, Sentencing Law, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 05.29.12

    * Dewey have some novel issues for our bankruptcy lawyers, or what? As we noted last night, now that D&L has filed for Chapter 11, they’ll have to deal with bank debt, and bondholders, and possible criminal proceedings, oh my! [New York Law Journal]

    * And did we mention that Dewey’s defectors and their new firms might get screwed out of millions thanks to the recent Coudert decision? You really should’ve tried to finish up your business before the firm flopped. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Our SCOTUS justices’ summer plans don’t include debating the results of their landmark health care and immigration cases. They’ll be off to fabulous destinations to teach by the first week of July. [Associated Press]

    * A federal judge in Brooklyn doesn’t like what seems to be happening in the “game of grams” when it comes to mandatory minimum drug sentencing. Perhaps the DOJ will heed his call for reform. [New York Times]

    * Facebook’s IPO was an epic fail, but it’s been great business for plaintiffs lawyers. Twelve securities class action firms are gathering leads and getting ready to sue, and two have already sued. [National Law Journal]

    * This wasn’t exactly well planned: if you’re involved in state politics, it’s probably not a good idea to fake a legal internship with a state representative so that you can graduate from law school. [Concord Monitor]

    * In happier news, a New York Law School graduate walked across the stage to receive her diploma with the help of her seeing-eye dog. The pooch hasn’t lifted a leg on her law degree… yet. [New York Daily News]

    * “Brothels are never going to be a vote winner.” But even so, if you’re looking to get it in down under, a plan to build Australia’s largest cathouse may soon gain approval if lawyers are able to do their work quick and dirty. [Bloomberg]

    * Thanks to this case, stupid teenagers in New Jersey who send texts to others that they know are driving can now revel in the fact that they can’t be held liable for injuries that may occur thanks to careless driving. [New Jersey Law Journal]

    2 Comments / / May 29, 2012 at 9:09 AM
  • peter griffin

    Attorney Misconduct, Books, California, Canada, Constitutional Law, Department of Justice, Family Law, John Edwards, Legal Ethics, Morning Docket, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Tax Law, Trials, Wall Street, Weddings

    Morning Docket: 05.25.12

    * In a Supreme Court decision split across gender lines, prosecutors can now get a do-over on criminal charges without double jeopardy, even if an otherwise deadlocked jury unanimously rejected them. [New York Times]

    * And yet another day ended without a verdict in the John Edwards campaign finance trial, but the jury asked to review every exhibit in the case. The former presidential candidate must feel like he’s being punk’d. [CNN]

    * The DOJ found that two prosecutors in the Ted Stevens case committed reckless professional misconduct punishable by unpaid time off. Looks like they’ll be getting an extended Memorial Day break. [Blog of Legal Times]

    * Hot on the heels of Obama’s announcement in support of gay marriage, yet another California judge has found that DOMA is unconstitutional (along with a provision of the tax code). [Poliglot / Metro Weekly]

    * Occupy Wall Street is suing for $48K over the destruction of the group’s “People’s Library” after their eviction from Zuccotti Park. But let’s get real, who wants used books that reek like patchouli and pot? [Bloomberg]

    * More than one million “de facto spouses” in Quebec may soon be automatically married by the state against their will. Imagine how much fun it’ll be to get a divorce from someone you never actually married. [Slate]

    * Two waitresses who claim they were fired for complaining about their former employer’s “no fatties” policy will get to bring their $15M lawsuit before a jury. Hopefully Peter Griffin isn’t a juror. [Law & Daily Life / FindLaw]

    5 Comments / / May 25, 2012 at 9:04 AM
  • Justice John Paul Stevens

    John Paul Stevens, Politics, Quote of the Day, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    Quote of the Day: Liar, Liar, Pants On Fire!

    Did politics influence the decision in Bush v. Gore? A Supreme Court justice has the answer…

    13 Comments / / May 23, 2012 at 5:40 PM
  • Supreme Court SCOTUS photo by David Lat

    Elena Kagan, Immigration, Kids, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Samuel Alito, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    Everyone Is Being Reasonable

    What happened at the Supreme Court this morning? Several decisions came down. Which ones? Any biggies?

    9 Comments / / May 21, 2012 at 1:44 PM
  • Justice Stephen Breyer

    Crime, SCOTUS, Stephen Breyer, Supreme Court

    Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer Stolen From… Again!

    Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer has been robbed twice in the past four months. What happened this time?

    27 Comments / / May 18, 2012 at 11:12 AM
  • KimKardashian

    Attorney Misconduct, Biglaw, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Facebook, General Counsel, In-House Counsel, John Edwards, Legal Ethics, Morning Docket, SCOTUS, Shoes, Stephen Breyer, Supreme Court, Tax Law, Trials, Women's Issues

    Morning Docket: 05.18.12

    * Rob me once, shame on you; rob me twice, shame on me? Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer was robbed for a second time, but this time as the victim of a burglary on May 4. [Thomson Reuters News & Insight]

    * Dewey know when this ship is finally going to capsize (so we can stop making these puns)? Two of D&L’s Hong Kong partners have decided to defect to DLA Piper, and more may be joining them soon. [Asian Lawyer]

    * He might’ve been a “bad husband,” but that doesn’t mean he’s guilty. The jury in John Edwards’s campaign finance trial will begin deliberating today. Let’s see if they convict him of being more than an adulterer. [CNN]

    * After his citizenship stunt, Eduardo Saverin can look forward to being defriended by the United States — not like that’s a bad thing, because to be honest, the movie version of him is much cuter. [New York Daily News]

    * And this is why lawyers shouldn’t try to be funny. Safeway’s General Counsel, Robert Gordon, is being branded a sexist for telling a recycled joke about pigs and D.C.’s most powerful women. [Corporate Counsel]

    * A three month suspension has been recommended for a former Treasury Department attorney who attempted to steal ties from Nordstrom. What, he couldn’t spring for a Neiman’s run? [National Law Journal]

    * If you bought those stupid ass Skechers Shape-Up shoes in the hope that your booty would look like Kim Kardashian’s, you can get a piece of the $40M settlement. Not bitter, not at all. [Los Angeles Times]

    0 Comments / / May 18, 2012 at 9:09 AM
  • 'I'll eat my placenta beans with some fava beans and a nice chianti.'

    9th Circuit, Cars, Police, Pregnancy / Paternity, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Violence, Women's Issues

    How Many Times Can You Tase a Pregnant Woman Before Your Case Winds Up Before the Supreme Court?

    Can you use a Taser on a pregnant woman? How many times can you do it? Once? Twice? Three times?

    39 Comments / / May 16, 2012 at 12:33 PM
  • Supreme Court SCOTUS photo by David Lat

    9th Circuit, Admin, Announcements, Bankruptcy, Diarmuid O'Scannlain, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Tax Law

    Bankrupt Farmers, Tax Law, and Bar Admissions Ceremonies

    Bankrupt farmers, tricky tax laws, and bar admission ceremonies are just some of the things you’ll encounter at the Supreme Court…

    31 Comments / / May 15, 2012 at 11:10 AM
  • federal judges Louis Pollak James Browning

    9th Circuit, Alex Kozinski, Deaths, Federal Judges, Feeder Judges, Law School Deans, Law Schools

    The Passing of Two Federal Judicial Giants

    Two distinguished federal judges recently passed away, after many years of dedicated service.

    15 Comments / / May 9, 2012 at 4:29 PM
  • Not the alleged hot-dog hooker.

    5th Circuit, 9/11, Abortion, Biglaw, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Food, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Prostitution, SCOTUS, Sex, Sex Scandals, Student Loans, Supreme Court, Texas

    Morning Docket: 05.07.12

    * While Dewey’s former culture gets roasted on a spit, and the seemingly unending drama gets turned into a montage of living lawyer jokes, we’re still waiting for the final punchline. [New York Times; Wall Street Journal]

    * Don Verrilli tried so hard, and got so far (depending on who you ask), but in the end, it doesn’t even matter. When Linkin Park lyrics apply to your oral argument skills, you know you’re kind of screwed. [New York Times]

    * The 9/11 arraignments went off without a hitch this weekend. And by that, we mean that it was a 13 hour hearing filled multiple interruptions, and grandstanding about “appropriate” courtroom fashion. [Fox News]

    * In a “re-re-reversal,” Judge Jerry Smith, on a three-judge panel of the Fifth Circuit, reinstated Planned Parenthood’s injunction against Texas, without even so much as a homework assignment. [Dallas Observer]

    * The It Gets Worse Project: if you thought that the Law School Transparency debt figures were scary before, then take a look at them now. Six figures of debt just got a lot harder to swallow. [National Law Journal]

    * Scalia gets busted on a case of hot-dog hooking. No, not that Scalia. A woman from Long Island has been accused, for the second time, of selling swallowing foot-longs in the back of her food truck. [New York Post]

    0 Comments / / May 7, 2012 at 9:05 AM