Washington Post

41YtD+ApH+L* A Saul Goodman Bobblehead. You know you want it. [Amazon (affiliate link)]

* It looks like that Jimmy John’s non-compete agreement we reported on is going to spawn a congressional inquiry. [Huffington Post]

* His dreams of becoming a solicitor were sidetracked when he was “jailed for slapping a sleeping woman in the face with his penis while a friend filmed it on his phone.” Well, yeah that’ll happen. [Daily Mail]

* A bunch of Blackwater guys got convicted. It did astoundingly little to fix the “hiring unsupervised mercenaries” thing. [Redline]

* The final report, drafted by Cadwalader, reveals that UNC’s African and Afro-American Studies department was basically a sham to keep athletes academically eligible. For almost 20 years. I don’t get it, I mean, UNC wasn’t even good for most of those years. [Deadspin]

* Apparently it’s frowned upon for prospective judges to say that someone “would prefer to see [my opponent] remain on the bench since [she] would allow him to have unsupervised visits with his own daughter, in spite of the evidence.” Good to know. [The Times-Picayune]

* Bob Ambrogi interviews David Lat about lawyers and social media. [Legal Talk Network]

* Hey NYC law community! The Young Professionals Leadership Council is throwing a prom at 230 Fifth to raise money to cure Cystic Fibrosis. So break out your formal wear and try to get through this prom without puking out of a limo window. All for a good cause. [Cystic Fibrosis Foundation]

* Former Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee passed away yesterday. Bradlee may be most famous for his role in pursuing Watergate, but fighting the Pentagon Papers case all the way to the Supreme Court helped shape First Amendment law in the latter half of the 20th century. [What About Clients?]

Jonathan Dach

Jonathan Dach

The past few weeks haven’t been much fun for Jonathan Dach. This promising young lawyer, a Yale College (2008) and Yale Law School (2013) graduate, found himself fingered by the Washington Post as the alleged client of a Colombian prostitute.

Why would anyone care about a young man hiring a prostitute in a jurisdiction — Cartagena, Colombia — where prostitution is legal? This allegedly all went down during the visit by President Obama to Colombia in which a bunch of Secret Service agents got in trouble for patronizing prostitutes, so the claim is that the White House protected one of its own — Dach, a White House volunteer at the time, is the son of a big-time Democratic donor — while hanging the Secret Service agents out to dry. And Dach now works at the State Department on a portfolio of women’s issues, which adds to the awkwardness.

But are the allegations even true? Various folks, both within the Yale community and beyond it, are rallying to Dach’s defense — and forcefully denying the claims against him. What do they have to say?

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “In Defense Of Jonathan Dach”

SCOTUS broke this Con Law nerd’s heart.

We should realize that this is an emperor that truly has no clothes. For too long, we have treated the Court [a]s if they are the high priests of the law, or at least as if they are the smartest and best lawyers in society.

Erwin Chemerinsky, preeminent constitutional law scholar and dean of the UC Irvine School of Law, writing in what Robert Barnes of the Washington Post refers to as the academic’s “break-up note” to the Supreme Court. In his new book, The Case Against the Supreme Court (affiliate link), Chemerinsky notes that “[t]he court has frequently failed, throughout American history, at its most important tasks, at its most important moments.”


Look, if I’ve got to get your eyes to my penis to see the problems with the nation, then so be it.

I want a major TV network. I want [a] 90-second spot on a major network during prime time. Yes, if you were from CNN and you said Anderson Cooper will air you tonight, I would pack up my signs and leave. Mission accomplished.

Brian Zulberti, in comments made to a reporter for the Washington Post, a publication that wasn’t worthy enough for him to eat. Zulberti is on day three of his Supreme Court hunger strike to raise awareness of social media firings.

I remember riding home one evening with Justice Lewis Powell, whom I was serving as a law clerk. I was pumped over a vote he had cast that day, and I expected him to share my excitement. He responded that he considered himself fortunate if only 48 percent of the legitimate points to be made were on the other side.

– Judge J. Harvie Wilkinson, writing in a Washington Post op-ed piece about the virtues required of judges — and how the elimination of the filibuster on many presidential nominees could lead to a less balanced judiciary.

When I can’t do the job, there will be signs. I know that Justice [John Paul] Stevens [who retired when he was 90] was concerned the last few years about his hearing. I’ve had no loss of hearing yet. But who knows when it could happen?

So all I can say is what I’ve already said: At my age, you take it year by year.

– Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, offering some cryptic comments on when she might step down, in an interview with Robert Barnes, Supreme Court reporter for the Washington Post.

(Do you think Justice Ginsburg, who is now 80 years old, should retire? Take our poll, after the jump.)

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Supreme Court Retirement Watch: RBG Drops Some Hints”

* Judges on the Third Circuit bench must really ♥ boobies. Breast cancer awareness bracelets can’t be banned by public schools if they aren’t lewd and if they comment on social issues. [Legal Intelligencer]

* A bevy of Biglaw firms were involved as advisers in the sale of the Boston Globe, Newsweek, and the Washington Post, including Cleary Gottlieb, Cravath, and Morgan Lewis, among others. [Am Law Daily]

* After surviving a motion for disqualification, Quinn Emanuel will continue to represent Snapchat. A short video of John Quinn laughing his ass off will be available for the next 10 seconds. [TechCrunch]

* Alex Rodriguez, the only MLB player who will be appealing his drug-related suspension, has hired Reed Smith and Gordon & Rees to hit it out of the park during arbitration proceedings. [Am Law Daily]

* Don’t say we never did you any favors: Here are the top 5 mistakes new in-house counsel make from the perspective of outside counsel. Take a look before you make them yourselves. [Texas Lawyer]

* We saw this coming back in June (seventh item), but now it’s official. Prenda Law has dissolved after posting six figures in bonds for various ethical sanctions. Next step, bankruptcy? [National Law Journal]

* If you’re interested in applying to a top 14 law school, make sure your stats and your story are both compelling. No one likes a boring law student. [Law Admissions Lowdown / U.S. News & World Report]

Mr. Milbank is a humorist and satirist. He can make mountains out of molehills if he wants to. But he should take a page out of Justice Alito’s book and pay more attention to getting it right.

William Ranney Levi and Dana Remus, former law clerks to Justice Samuel Alito, in a letter to the Washington Post responding to an article by Dana Milbank. Milbank accused the justice of “demonstrat[ing] his disdain” for his women colleagues while on the bench.

Dear internet, make me a graphic like this, only for law school prices and with, like, a student crying or something.

So we’re all going to vote tomorrow, and then on Wednesday most of us are going to wake up with the same old problems. I’m going to need to lose some weight. Romney’s going to be an unemployed rich guy nobody likes. And America’s law students are going to wake up in the middle of the night worried about getting jobs.

Last week, the Washington Post wrote an important article on the abysmal state of the legal job market. It sounded notes that are familiar to regular readers of Above the Law, but I feel that whenever the facts about legal education make it into the Post or the New York Times, it’s important because parents see it there. The more parents know, the less likely they are to push their kids into law.

While most of us know the broad picture (it’s a figurative disaster), it is still fun to pick through rubble….

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Washington Post Hops On The ‘Do Law Students Know How Stupid They Are’ Bandwagon”

Austin Tice

Right now seems to be Georgetown University Law Center’s time in the spotlight. Last month, a recent GULC grad, Sandra Fluke, addressed the Democratic National Convention. Last night, we wrote about another Georgetown law alum and his creative but controversial solution to student loan debt.

Many of you have been following the story of Austin Tice, a current Georgetown law student. Tice, a freelance journalist and former Marine, made headlines back in August, when he went missing in war-torn Syria.

Today we bring you news, both good and bad, about Austin Tice….

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “New Video Appears To Show Austin Tice, Missing Journalist and Georgetown Law Student, Being Held By Islamist Captors”

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