Election Law

  • TexasFlag

    Non-Sequiturs, Uncategorized

    Non-Sequiturs: 05.01.15

    * If you think the federal government is preparing a military takeover of Texas… you might be a redneck. And you might also be Governor Greg Abbott. [Forbes]

    * Elie says it’s time to end the expansive powers of arrest, for the good of everyone. [New York Daily News]

    * Most of the 2016 presidential hopefuls are breaking the law. It’s good practice for if they win. [LFC 360]

    * Not to dismiss the important point made in this article about substandard housing and the dangers of lead paint, but I think there may be other lessons to learn from Freddie Gray. [Washington Post]

    * Satanic Temples are taking this RFRA thing and running with it. [Jezebel]

    * Over in the EU, Louis Vuitton failed to win back the trademark it claims on its checkerboard pattern. [Fashionista]

    * I’ve not read this yet, but here’s a collection of Legal Notices To Superheroes. Per the description, “A Letter to Superman from United States Citizenship and Immigration Services” has a lot of promise. [Amazon (affiliate link)]

    * And remember to vote for the winner of the 2015 ATL Law Revue contest. Voting concludes Sunday at 11:59 p.m. EST. [Above the Law]

    13 Comments / / May 1, 2015 at 4:59 PM
  • Floyd Mayweather (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)

    Morning Docket

    Morning Docket: 05.01.15

    * Floyd Mayweather’s lawyer says that his client will post Suge Knight’s insanely high $10 million bail if he wins his fight against Manny Pacquiao. Suge says he was “really going to pull for him to win, but now [he’s] going to have to pray for him to win.” [Los Angeles Times]

    * Northwestern University School of Law is launching a first-of-its-kind loan repayment assistance program to help grads in “modestly salaried private sector jobs” — that is, if you make less than $85,000, the school will pay your loan interest for up to a year. [National Law Journal via CBS]

    * If you haven’t heard, the class of 2014 was much more employed than the class of 2013 by a factor of a few percentage points. Apply to law school right now! (No, don’t do that. The class of 2014 was smaller, so it looks like the job stats were better.) [ABA Journal]

    * “[T]he jury is out and the only sane thing you can say about Dentons is check back in three years.” Hot on the heels of the announced merger between Dentons and McKenna Long, many lawyers are running for the exits. [Big Law Business / Bloomberg BNA]

    * If you’re interested in going to law school on the east coast, then you may want to take a look at this list of schools, ranked by total employment of the class of 2014. We’d shudder to see what this list would look like if only long-term, full-time jobs were used. [BostInno]

    * A lawyer who’s suing former U.S. Representative Aaron Schock on behalf of a campaign donor says he’s been unable to locate the disgraced politician to serve him. What will happen now? We bet you can find out on the next episode of Downton Abbey. [ABC News]

    0 Comments / / May 1, 2015 at 8:55 AM
  • florida-state-outline

    Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 03.25.15

    * Dildos and cock rings. Just another day for the Eleventh Circuit down in America’s wang. [Southern District of Florida Blog]

    * Everything you need to know about today’s Alabama redistricting decisions from Professor Rick Hasen. It’s a longer and more nuanced way to say “Pyrrhic victory.” [Election Law Blog]

    * The Supreme Court is way eloquent. [Lowering the Bar]

    * Looks like we already have a real-life example of what happens when white-collar industries adopt new technology. Enjoy unemployment! [Law and More]

    * Another scintillating legal debate coming up next week: do the President’s war powers exceed constitutional authority? [Intelligence Squared]

    * If you’re in Nashville, you can see Lat in person. It’s on April Fool’s Day, so start thinking of how you want to punk him. [Vanderbilt Law]

    * Harvard Law’s Lambda chapter kills its diversity amendment. Guess it was too much to hope a bunch of law students had solved de Tocqueville’s “tyranny of the majority” puzzle. [Harvard Law Record]

    * Another installment in David’s chat with Bloomberg. Lat compares some firms to Ferraris… I’m guessing he doesn’t watch much racing unless he meant to say, “some firms spend massive amounts of money to remain woefully second-rate to Mercedes and Renault.” [Bloomberg BNA / Big Law Business]

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KoS0wdteBS0

    12 Comments / / Mar 25, 2015 at 4:57 PM
  • Angry menager

    Morning Docket

    Morning Docket: 02.06.15

    * Justice Ginsburg is concerned that “our system is being polluted” by the deluge of money that’s being dumped into election campaigns, including judicial elections. “Something is terribly wrong” and it needs to be fixed. [Legal Times]

    * A Suffolk Law professor says laptops should be banned from law school classrooms because of a recent study that says taking verbatim notes makes student comprehension suffer. But then they wouldn’t be able to play online! :( [ABA Journal]

    * “It is virtually inevitable that some or many of the carriers will challenge the rules.” It’s highly likely that net neutrality will be headed back to the courts, no matter what the Federal Communications Commission has to say about it. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * “I think that a law degree is a worthwhile investment for students that have a goal. I don’t know if it’s good for students trying to figure things out.” Enrollment is down at Elon Law, but you should go if your goal is to be employed… eventually. [Pendulum]

    * “Trying to make a claim there’s negligence when there are lawful exemptions is very problematic.” Also problematic are the measles outbreaks across the country, and it may soon be harder for parents to opt out of vaccinations. [National Law Journal]

    4 Comments / / Feb 6, 2015 at 9:03 AM
  • Selma Movie Poster

    Movies

    What The Controversy Over ‘Selma’ Can Teach Us About ‘Accuracy’ In Legal Movies And Television Shows

    Do you care about “accuracy” in law-related movies and TV shows? What about implausibility?

    9 Comments / / Jan 29, 2015 at 2:44 PM
  • rock concert

    Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 01.14.15

    * Judge really, really works hard to make classic rock references in this opinion. Guess he Can’t Get Enough of his Rock ‘n Roll Fantasy. [South Florida Lawyers]

    * Trouble in paradise? Well, no. But trouble in D.C.: American University law professor accuses George Washington Law of predatory poaching. [TaxProf Blog]

    * America should offer a $200 tax credit for political contributions. As always, you can buy more tax loopholes with higher contributions. [Los Angeles Times]

    * Baby justices are hatching from their eggs. [The Onion]

    * New York City Council member is looking to cap Uber’s surge pricing at 2x. Or, you know, people could use the function on the app that tells you how much you’re going to be charged. [Gawker]

    * Continuing analysis of the California Bar Exam results. In case you were wondering how the correspondence and distance learning schools performed. [Bar Exam Stats]

    * The Supreme Court hands down an interesting sentencing law opinion today. Finally, I got a FantasySCOTUS prediction (mostly) right! [Sentencing Law and Policy]

    * If lowly work were considered cool, we wouldn’t have all those annoying stereotypes sitting next to us. [Law and More]

    1 Comment / / Jan 14, 2015 at 5:35 PM
  • Chris Christie Governor Christopher Christie

    Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 01.06.15

    * Governor Chris Christie was worried America didn’t realize he has no respect for his constituents and is a complete fake, so he’s publicly rooting for the Dallas Cowboys over any of the three teams real New Jersey residents root for. He’s also possibly violating ethics rules. [The Legal Blitz / ATL Redline]

    * Screech is going to trial. [Associated Press / Yahoo! News]

    * New dean at USC. Who is it? [USC Gould School of Law]

    * As the Supreme Court stares down the barrel of some highly political cases, will Chief Justice Roberts live up to his promise of non-partisanship? [Chicago Sun-Times]

    * Judge Richard Kopf reviews our own Mark Hermann’s book, The Curmudgeon’s Guide to Practicing Law (affiliate link). The verdict? It’s curmudgeon-y. [Hercules and the Umpire]

    * David appeared on MSNBC’s The Docket today to discuss Supreme Ambitions (affiliate link). [MSNBC]

    * The GOP is very, very against using the popular vote to elect a president which they characterize as an effort to “steal the presidency.” Seriously. [Concurring Opinions]

    16 Comments / / Jan 6, 2015 at 5:33 PM
  • Festivus_Pole

    Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 12.23.14

    * Today is Festivus. For the rest of us. [PrawfsBlawg]

    * “Law Schools Shouldn’t Despair: If History Is Any Guide, the Legal Profession Will Be in Vogue Again Before Too Long.” It’ll be a Festivus miracle. [TaxProf Blog]

    * CNN lawyers and Cosby lawyers are sniping at each other and it’s getting ugly. They all need a nice Rohypnol-flavored Jell-O pudding pop to calm down. [Maynard Institute]

    * Should law clerks betray their bosses? The ethical dilemma of Supreme Ambitions (affiliate link). [The Volokh Conspiracy / Washington Post]

    * Toy guns… not so much a holiday staple these days. [Lawyers, Guns & Money]

    * Stephen Colbert’s lawyer, Trevor Potter, talks about life after the Report. [Legal Times]

    * Mark your calendars: Court to decide if it’ll hear marriage equality cases on January 9. [BuzzFeed]

    * If you’re looking for fashion advice and one-stop shopping, Corporette just compiled her favorite posts of 2014. [Corporette]

    11 Comments / / Dec 23, 2014 at 3:46 PM
  • Election Law Politics Voting

    Election Law, Politics, Public Interest

    The Plight Of The Municipal Lawyer At Election Time

    Please welcome new columnist Sam Wright (not his real name), who will be covering the world of public interest law.

    8 Comments / / Dec 2, 2014 at 1:59 PM
  • Time to Retire - Clock

    Morning Docket

    Morning Docket: 12.01.14

    * Some think SCOTUS should be the biggest issue of Election 2016. Why? Because most of the justices are old as hell, and they’ll only be older, more decrepit — and potentially more likely to retire — before or come voting time. [Washington Post]

    * Deans from “middle-ranked” schools continue to question the results of the July 2014 bar examination. Sure, recent grads were part of the law school brain drain, but there’s no way they were “less able” than their older (and wiser) classmates. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Darren Wilson resigned this weekend, but it wasn’t because he killed an unarmed teenager in August. Wilson’s lawyer says his client quit because other Ferguson officers could’ve been harmed if Wilson remained on the police force. [Reuters]

    * There’s only one thing that’s worse than a gunner, and that’s a septuagenarian gunner. At 73 years old, Jim Edwards is the oldest student at the Nashville School of Law, and he “view[s] what [he’s] doing as a calling from God.” Aww. [USA Today]

    * This recent law school graduate may not have a job, but she figured out a creative way to make a small dent in her debt. She makes custom string art and sells it on Etsy. We’re willing to bet Texas Tech Law counts her as employed. [Dallas Morning News]

    40 Comments / / Dec 1, 2014 at 9:06 AM
  • Ballot Box

    Election Law, Politics, State Judges

    Judge Loses Election, Vows To Ignore Result

    Electing judges creates a messy system. And it’s messier when one of the judges doesn’t believe in the process.

    18 Comments / / Nov 10, 2014 at 11:01 AM
  • Voting

    Election Law, Politics

    The Verdict: Ballot Measures

    Here are the most interesting under-reported ballot measures this Election Day

    14 Comments / / Nov 4, 2014 at 4:52 PM
  • passport US passport

    Courthouses, D.C. Circuit, Department of Justice, Election Law, Environment / Environmental Law, Non-Sequiturs, Politics, Privacy, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Technology

    Non-Sequiturs: 11.03.14

    * Floridian women lawyers got their wish: Bad Judge, plagued by bad ratings, is getting canceled. [Daily Business Review]

    * A round-up of write-ups about today’s oral arguments in the Israel / Jerusalem passport case. [How Appealing]

    * Interesting reflections from Professor Glenn Reynolds on the controversial catcalling video.
    [USA Today via Instapundit]

    * Things are bats**t insane — literally — at this Utah courthouse. [Gawker]

    * The D.C. Circuit gives the EPA its way on cross-state air pollution. [Breaking Energy]

    * Election monitors from the Justice Department: possibly coming to a jurisdiction near you (including Bergen County, New Jersey, where I grew up). [BuzzFeed]

    * Can cops force suspects to use their fingerprints to unlock their cellphones? Eric Crusius and Lisa Giovinazzo debate, after the jump. [Fox News]

    11 Comments / / Nov 3, 2014 at 4:32 PM
  • Supreme Court Justice Seamus McCaffrey

    DUI / DWI, Election Law, Law Schools, Non-Sequiturs, Pornography, Pro Se Litigants, State Judges, Television, Trademarks

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.27.14

    * After being temporarily suspended as part of “Porngate” for trafficking in “highly demeaning portrayals of members of various segments of the population, including women, elderly persons, and uniformed school girls,” Seamus McCaffrey retires from the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. [Philadelphia Daily News]

    * A group of women lawyers in Miami has called for NBC to cancel Bad Judge because it “depicts a female judge as unethical, lazy, crude, hyper-sexualized, and unfit to hold such an esteemed position of power.” Indeed there’s no place for depicting women judges that way on TV. Especially when Miami is perfectly capable of depicting them that way in real life. [Crushable]

    * Epic trademark infringement. [Legal Cheek]

    * Crazy pro se guy slapped down in Canada. [Lowering the Bar]

    * While almost everyone else is seeing lower applications, USC Law saw a 5 percent bump. [USC Gould School of Law]

    * Stanford and Dartmouth in hot water over election law charges in Montana. Apparently piercing the imaginary veil of non-partisanship in judicial elections is the problem and not the whole idea of judicial elections in the first place. [Montana Standard]

    5 Comments / / Oct 27, 2014 at 4:36 PM
  • 220px-Eric_Holder_official_portrait

    11th Circuit, Copyright, Department of Justice, Election Law, Fashion, Law Reviews, Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.20.14

    * Eric Holder gave millions to Nazis! Or at least that’s how Darrell Issa will put it. But seriously, the Department of Justice has a long-standing policy of allowing Nazi war criminals to collect Social Security payments if they agree to get the hell out of the U.S. [Associated Press via New Europe]

    * A Cleveland attorney, Peter Pattakos, is not worried about contracting Ebola, even though he was in a room with a current Ebola patient, because Pattakos is neither a crazy person nor a cable news producer and realizes that he never exchanged bodily fluids with the patient. As he points out, “I’m much more likely to be mistakenly killed by a police officer in this country than to be killed by Ebola, even if you were in the same bridal shop.” [Cleveland.com]

    * Chanel is suing What About Yves for trademark infringement. The question Professor Colman asks is whether “we really want a trademark ‘protection’ regime in which mark ‘owners’ can prevent creative, non-confusing uses of ‘their property.’” [Law of Fashion]

    * One for the career alternatives file: Miami lawyer who ranks local restaurants opens his own restaurant. At ATL we rank law schools, maybe we should open our own law school. [Southern District of Florida Blog]

    * Academic publishers fighting the war on common sense by charging an arm and a leg for access to research that is written and peer reviewed by other people for free scored a victory on Friday when the Eleventh Circuit rejected the lower court’s articulation of educational fair use in the digital age. [The Chronicle of Higher Education]

    * Balancing parenthood and the “jealous mistress” that is the practice of law. [Jed Cain]

    * An amazing symposium on campaign finance reform from the NYU Law Review and the Brennan Center for Justice. It’s a wealth of content. [NYU Law Review]

    * Josh Gilliland from The Legal Geeks gave a presentation on Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and the Law at the San Diego Comic Fest, which sounds much more fun than any “and the Law” class I ever took. He’s provided his slideshow presentation…

    8 Comments / / Oct 20, 2014 at 4:58 PM
  • LSAT scantron

    Department of Justice, Disasters / Emergencies, Election Law, General Counsel, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Prisons, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Texas, Trials

    Morning Docket: 10.20.14

    * The Supreme Court is allowing Texas to enforce its strict voter identification law during the upcoming election, but Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, hero to the masses, wrote a rather scathing dissent in opposition. [New York Times]

    * Michael Millikin, GM’s beleaguered GC, will be stepping down from his position while the Justice Department continues its probe into the company’s fatal ignition switch failures. A replacement has not yet been named. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Baltimore Law and Maryland’s HBCUs hooked up to assist underrepresented minorities get into law school. Full scholarships come with GPAs of at least 3.5 and LSAT scores of at least 152. [USA Today]

    * Kent Easter, the lawyer who was convicted for planting drugs in a school volunteer’s car, was sentenced to serve six months in jail. His law license will likely be suspended (just like his wife’s was). [OC Weekly]

    * Accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev isn’t doing well in court, and his trial hasn’t even started yet. Motions to dismiss his case and to suppress evidence were denied. [National Law Journal]

    39 Comments / / Oct 20, 2014 at 9:12 AM
  • Amal Clooney

    5th Circuit, Abortion, Biglaw, Celebrities, Crime, Election Law, Eric Holder, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Student Loans, Texas, U.S. Attorneys Offices, United Kingdom / Great Britain, Weddings

    Morning Docket: 10.15.14

    * The Fifth Circuit is allowing the Texas voter ID law to be enforced during the upcoming election, even though it was recently struck down by a federal judge. After all, “preserving the status quo” is very important down south. [Bloomberg]

    * We suppose that’s why the Supreme Court stepped in to make sure that abortion clinics in Texas were allowed to reopen following their shut down. Take that, Fifth Circuit. [New York Times]

    * AG Eric Holder is showing off some fancy legal footwork before he walks out the door. Federal prosecutors can no longer ask defendants to waive their IAC claims when pleading guilty. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Davis Polk & Wardwell is a Biglaw firm where hotties roam, and it looks like this top Justice Department prosecutor who started his career there is returning home there to roost. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * It’s the debt: With headlines like “Law school applications plummet – at U of L too,” the University of Louisville School of Law can’t even convince alums from its undergrad school to attend. [Courier-Journal]

    * Amal Alamuddin changed her name to Amal Clooney on her firm’s website. It’s as if she wants to rub the fact that she’s a human rights lawyer who just got married in everyone’s face. [New York Daily News]

    30 Comments / / Oct 15, 2014 at 9:08 AM
  • Carmelo Anthony

    Election Law, Non-Sequiturs, SCOTUS, Sports, Supreme Court, Wall Street

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.03.14

    * Apparently, heckling Carmelo Anthony can cost you your job. [Dealbreaker]

    * There’s nothing the Supreme Court can do to stop cops who want to take a long time to release you from a stop, even if the Court wants to. [Simple Justice]

    * I think we should just ask John Roberts to tell every state precisely how they are allowed to discriminate against black voters and be done with it. Just tell us the rules so we can start the GOTV campaigns. [Election Law Blog]

    * Former Manhattan Assemblywoman Gabriela Rosa gets a year in jail for purchasing a sham marriage to gain citizenship. The “for citizenship” part is what got her, because lots of politicians are in sham marriages. [Journal News]

    * Judge Frank Easterbrook thinks that the new proposed length limit for appellate briefs is too short. Verbose litigators everywhere, rejoice. [How Appealing]

    * I thought “spoofing” was bad for the market, but Matt Levine says cracking down on spoofing “helps” high-frequency traders, who I also think are bad for the market. You know why I’m not an SEC lawyer? Prosecuting people based on them being “bad” becomes untenable when everybody involved is rich. [Bloomberg View]

    24 Comments / / Oct 3, 2014 at 4:04 PM