Election Law

  • 220px-Eric_Holder_official_portrait

    11th Circuit, Copyright, Department of Justice, Election Law, Fashion, Law Reviews, Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.20.14

    * Eric Holder gave millions to Nazis! Or at least that’s how Darrell Issa will put it. But seriously, the Department of Justice has a long-standing policy of allowing Nazi war criminals to collect Social Security payments if they agree to get the hell out of the U.S. [Associated Press via New Europe]

    * A Cleveland attorney, Peter Pattakos, is not worried about contracting Ebola, even though he was in a room with a current Ebola patient, because Pattakos is neither a crazy person nor a cable news producer and realizes that he never exchanged bodily fluids with the patient. As he points out, “I’m much more likely to be mistakenly killed by a police officer in this country than to be killed by Ebola, even if you were in the same bridal shop.” [Cleveland.com]

    * Chanel is suing What About Yves for trademark infringement. The question Professor Colman asks is whether “we really want a trademark ‘protection’ regime in which mark ‘owners’ can prevent creative, non-confusing uses of ‘their property.’” [Law of Fashion]

    * One for the career alternatives file: Miami lawyer who ranks local restaurants opens his own restaurant. At ATL we rank law schools, maybe we should open our own law school. [Southern District of Florida Blog]

    * Academic publishers fighting the war on common sense by charging an arm and a leg for access to research that is written and peer reviewed by other people for free scored a victory on Friday when the Eleventh Circuit rejected the lower court’s articulation of educational fair use in the digital age. [The Chronicle of Higher Education]

    * Balancing parenthood and the “jealous mistress” that is the practice of law. [Jed Cain]

    * An amazing symposium on campaign finance reform from the NYU Law Review and the Brennan Center for Justice. It’s a wealth of content. [NYU Law Review]

    * Josh Gilliland from The Legal Geeks gave a presentation on Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and the Law at the San Diego Comic Fest, which sounds much more fun than any “and the Law” class I ever took. He’s provided his slideshow presentation…

    8 Comments / / Oct 20, 2014 at 4:58 PM
  • LSAT scantron

    Department of Justice, Disasters / Emergencies, Election Law, General Counsel, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Prisons, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Texas, Trials

    Morning Docket: 10.20.14

    * The Supreme Court is allowing Texas to enforce its strict voter identification law during the upcoming election, but Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, hero to the masses, wrote a rather scathing dissent in opposition. [New York Times]

    * Michael Millikin, GM’s beleaguered GC, will be stepping down from his position while the Justice Department continues its probe into the company’s fatal ignition switch failures. A replacement has not yet been named. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Baltimore Law and Maryland’s HBCUs hooked up to assist underrepresented minorities get into law school. Full scholarships come with GPAs of at least 3.5 and LSAT scores of at least 152. [USA Today]

    * Kent Easter, the lawyer who was convicted for planting drugs in a school volunteer’s car, was sentenced to serve six months in jail. His law license will likely be suspended (just like his wife’s was). [OC Weekly]

    * Accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev isn’t doing well in court, and his trial hasn’t even started yet. Motions to dismiss his case and to suppress evidence were denied. [National Law Journal]

    39 Comments / / Oct 20, 2014 at 9:12 AM
  • Amal Clooney

    5th Circuit, Abortion, Biglaw, Celebrities, Crime, Election Law, Eric Holder, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Student Loans, Texas, U.S. Attorneys Offices, United Kingdom / Great Britain, Weddings

    Morning Docket: 10.15.14

    * The Fifth Circuit is allowing the Texas voter ID law to be enforced during the upcoming election, even though it was recently struck down by a federal judge. After all, “preserving the status quo” is very important down south. [Bloomberg]

    * We suppose that’s why the Supreme Court stepped in to make sure that abortion clinics in Texas were allowed to reopen following their shut down. Take that, Fifth Circuit. [New York Times]

    * AG Eric Holder is showing off some fancy legal footwork before he walks out the door. Federal prosecutors can no longer ask defendants to waive their IAC claims when pleading guilty. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Davis Polk & Wardwell is a Biglaw firm where hotties roam, and it looks like this top Justice Department prosecutor who started his career there is returning home there to roost. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * It’s the debt: With headlines like “Law school applications plummet – at U of L too,” the University of Louisville School of Law can’t even convince alums from its undergrad school to attend. [Courier-Journal]

    * Amal Alamuddin changed her name to Amal Clooney on her firm’s website. It’s as if she wants to rub the fact that she’s a human rights lawyer who just got married in everyone’s face. [New York Daily News]

    30 Comments / / Oct 15, 2014 at 9:08 AM
  • Carmelo Anthony

    Election Law, Non-Sequiturs, SCOTUS, Sports, Supreme Court, Wall Street

    Non-Sequiturs: 10.03.14

    * Apparently, heckling Carmelo Anthony can cost you your job. [Dealbreaker]

    * There’s nothing the Supreme Court can do to stop cops who want to take a long time to release you from a stop, even if the Court wants to. [Simple Justice]

    * I think we should just ask John Roberts to tell every state precisely how they are allowed to discriminate against black voters and be done with it. Just tell us the rules so we can start the GOTV campaigns. [Election Law Blog]

    * Former Manhattan Assemblywoman Gabriela Rosa gets a year in jail for purchasing a sham marriage to gain citizenship. The “for citizenship” part is what got her, because lots of politicians are in sham marriages. [Journal News]

    * Judge Frank Easterbrook thinks that the new proposed length limit for appellate briefs is too short. Verbose litigators everywhere, rejoice. [How Appealing]

    * I thought “spoofing” was bad for the market, but Matt Levine says cracking down on spoofing “helps” high-frequency traders, who I also think are bad for the market. You know why I’m not an SEC lawyer? Prosecuting people based on them being “bad” becomes untenable when everybody involved is rich. [Bloomberg View]

    24 Comments / / Oct 3, 2014 at 4:04 PM
  • Voting rights

    Election Law, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    Why Do Conservative Justices Hate Voters?

    Restricting voting rights is the wrong side of history

    149 Comments / / Sep 30, 2014 at 3:05 PM
  • Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

  • She's not a porn star, she's a law student.

    Biglaw, Election Law, Eric Holder, Law Firm Mergers, Law School Deans, Law Schools, Money, Morning Docket, Partner Issues, Politics, Pornography, State Judges, State Judges Are Clowns

    Morning Docket: 09.29.14

    * Now that we know Eric Holder is resigning, there’s been speculation as to where he’ll go next. The obvious choice is a return to Covington & Burling, but he could still surprise everyone. [National Law Journal]

    * “Judicial campaign cash is burning a hole in the Constitution.” State court judges are pumping money into their election campaigns, and some have been left to wonder about its true price. [New York Times]

    * Details have emerged as to conditions that must be met for Bingham McCutchen’s proposed merger with Morgan Lewis: partner promises, de-equitizations, and forgivable loans, oh my! [Reuters (sub. req.)]

    * In the wake of Dean Makau Mutua’s decision to step down at Buffalo Law, a “deep rift” among faculty has been brought to light. The school’s future doesn’t seem as “bright” as we were one told. [Buffalo News]

    * A former law student who was falsely identified as a porn star on the radio had her day in court and pulled out a win. Here’s the money shot: she’s walking away with $1 million in damages. [Kansas City Star]

    5 Comments / / Sep 29, 2014 at 9:05 AM
  • Dinesh D'Souza

    Bankruptcy, Biglaw, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Dreier, Election Law, International Law, Law Schools, Morning Docket

    Morning Docket: 09.24.14

    * The United States is launching air strikes against ISIS in Syria and Iraq, but some have been compelled to wonder whether it’s legal under international law. Of course it’s legal, under the Rule of ‘MERICA, F*CK YEAH! [BBC]

    * Dewey know whether this failed firm’s former COO can get out of paying $9.3M to its bankruptcy trustee? Dewey know whether we’ll ever be able to stop using this pun? Sadly, the answer to both questions is no. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Marc Dreier of the defunct Dreier LLP has been ordered to testify in person in his firm’s bankruptcy case in Manhattan, but he’d rather stay in the comforts of his prison home in Minnesota. Aww. [Bloomberg]

    * Dinesh D’Souza won’t have to do hard prison time for his campaign-finance violations. Instead, he’ll be spending eight months in a “community confinement center,” which sounds just peachy. [New York Times]

    * Northwestern Law is launching a campaign to fundraise $150M to be spent on an endless supply of Chick-fil-A sandwiches financial aid for students and curriculum improvements. [National Law Journal]

    3 Comments / / Sep 24, 2014 at 9:01 AM
  • Bill of rights 2

    Constitutional Law, Drinking, Election Law, Politics, Women's Issues

    Constitution Day Special: Our Favorite Unheralded Amendments

    Above the Law’s favorite Amendments that nobody ever talks about.

    47 Comments / / Sep 17, 2014 at 5:27 PM
  • iPhone

    Books, Contract Attorneys, Election Law, Insider Trading, Non-Sequiturs, White-Collar Crime

    Non-Sequiturs: 09.17.14

    * Law student sends naked selfie to her father. Hilarity ensues. [Inside Edition]

    * “Is insider trading bad?” Asking for a friend. [The Atlantic]

    * Judge catches law firm cheating on the page limit. Apparently, Judge Carl Barbier was well-versed in the “slightly less than double-spaced” trick. [NPR]

    * What’s the matter with (statutory interpretation in) Kansas? [KSN]

    * You may have heard that technology is going to gut the market for low-level lawyering. If not, here’s a wakeup call. [Forbes]

    * This year’s MacArthur genius grant recipients. Is your name on the list? SPOILER: No. But a William Mitchell Law professor is. [New York Times]

    * Steve Klepper’s fair-minded and favorable review of Lat’s forthcoming book, Supreme Ambitions (affiliate link). [Maryland Appellate Blog]

    4 Comments / / Sep 17, 2014 at 5:05 PM
  • Oscar Pistorius

    Andrew Cuomo, Deaths, Election Law, Law Professors, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Murder, Politics, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Trials

    Morning Docket: 09.12.14

    * Following the divisive decision in Shelby County v. Holder, voting rights cases may be heading back to the SCOTUS sooner than we thought. Thanks, Texas and Wisconsin. [USA Today]

    * Bienvenidos a Miami? Cities compete to be designated as sites where global arbitration matters are heard. Miami is an up-and-comer, but New York is king. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * Thanks to anonymous donors, the reward for info related to FSU Law Professor Dan Markel’s murder has been raised to $25,000. Not a single suspect has been named since his death. [Tallahassee Democrat]

    * After losing the Democratic primary to Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Professor Zephyr Teachout drank some gin and tonics like a boss before returning to her class at Fordham Law to teach property. [New York Times]

    * Try as he might, the Blade Runner just can’t outrun the law: Oscar Pistorius might have been cleared on the murder charge he was facing, but now he’s been found guilty on a culpable homicide charge. [CNN]

    1 Comment / / Sep 12, 2014 at 9:08 AM
  • iStock_000025862603_Small

    Drugs, Election Law, Fashion, Marijuana, Music, Non-Sequiturs, Patents, Prisons, Trademarks

    Non-Sequiturs: 08.26.14

    * This probably goes without saying, but don’t smuggle drugs into prison. This grandpa apparently failed that lesson. [Legal Juice]

    * Town gets fed up and just sues every single citizen. [Lowering the Bar]

    * A city lawyer heads out to the country to woo a pretty maid. At least this song gets it right and the lawyer fails. [Legal Cheek]

    * Some thoughts on trademark law and post-parody fashion, from Professor Charles Colman. [U. Penn Law Review]

    * Attorneys took different approaches to litigating slavery. Nothing really funny here, it’s just interesting. [The Faculty Lounge]

    * James Sherwin of SOR Solicitors made this infographic about patents in Europe (and where Ireland fits in). In case you ever wanted to know if Europe’s intellectual property set up is as crazy as America’s. [SOR-Solicitors]

    0 Comments / / Aug 26, 2014 at 5:32 PM
  • iStock_000002980469_Small

    Biglaw, Election Law, Law Schools, Libraries / Librarians, Non-Sequiturs, Politics

    Non-Sequiturs: 08.13.14

    * Maybe you weren’t excited about Hofstra Law School, but did you hear they now have bean bag chairs in the library? Well, that changes everything! [Virtual Library Cat’s Eye View]

    * An interview with Peter Kalis on the future of Biglaw, in which he states, “I cross bridges and burn them behind me.” Flame on! [Forbes]

    * This essay sums up so much about the state of America through the lens of the killing of Michael Brown. [The Concourse]

    * While we focused on the tale of Judge Mark Fuller, who spent some time in jail on a domestic violence accusation, he may be part of a trend — Judge Lance Mason was charged with felonious assault after allegedly punching and biting his wife while they were driving. Biting? [Cleveland Plain Dealer]

    * Have you ever wondered how every law school can give its students “excellent” educations? [The Legal Watchdog]

    * Failed Mississippi candidate Chris McDaniel is challenging a bunch of votes. Including his own lawyer’s. [Wonkette]

    * Tim Corcoran, President of the Legal Marketing Association, chides state bar associations for meddling with the evolution of the legal profession. Video after the jump…. [Mimesis Law]

    1 Comment / / Aug 13, 2014 at 5:00 PM
  • Ballot box america

    Election Law, Politics

    Battling Anecdotes With Symbols: Why The Voter ID Debate Goes Nowhere

    What types of election crimes do voter ID laws prevent, and what burdens and harms do they cause?

    56 Comments / / Aug 7, 2014 at 5:33 PM
  • 220px-NYSCourtofAppeals1

    Bankruptcy, Biglaw, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Election Law, FTC, Legal Ethics, Morning Docket, Sexual Harassment, White-Collar Crime

    Morning Docket: 07.02.14

    * The New York Court of Appeals put the hurt on defunct firms seeking unfinished business fees from former partners who left for greener pastures. Sorry, I didn’t follow ATL protocol: “Dewey think firms should collect unfinished business fees?” [Wall Street Journal Law Blog]

    * We reported on the Tinder lawsuit yesterday. Here’s a collection of all the messed up texts involved. [Valleywag]

    * Facebook’s lawyer is now calling the emotional manipulation study it recently conducted “customer service.” Dear Internet: Despite all your rage, you’re still just rats in a cage. [The Atlantic]

    * So if you’re studying for the MPRE, blow jobs aren’t the preferred legal fee. [Legal Profession Blog]

    * How did your last cell phone bill look? Because the FTC says T-Mobile knowingly added hundreds of millions of charges on. At least that girl in pink was cute, huh? [USA Today]

    * BNP Paribas is confident it can pay its record fine. [Dealbook / New York Times]

    * Meanwhile, Putin accused the U.S. of trying to use the BNP fine to blackmail France into turning its back on Russia. Because conspiracy theories are awesome. [Bloomberg]

    * Lawsuit filed because right-wingers totally miffed that black people voted for a Republican. [Sun Herald (Mississippi)]

    / Jul 2, 2014 at 9:06 AM
  • NCAA_logo.svg

    11th Circuit, Antitrust, China, Election Law, Law Schools, Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 06.27.14

    * As I noted yesterday over at Redline, the defense in the NCAA trial is putting up some terrible witnesses. Here’s another example. The NCAA’s expert wrote a textbook. The NCAA might have wanted to check it out before bringing him on to help defend themselves IN AN ANTITRUST CASE. [Twitter / Stewart Mandel]

    * Elie and I got in a spirited discussion with Slate’s Jordan Weissmann over my edits to his piece on law schools. And it looks like some outside observers took notice. [Law and More]

    * The case for grade inflation. [The Atlantic]

    * In Wisconsin, a Scott Walker supporter allegedly voted for his boy 5 times. His defense is ripped from a Days of Our Lives script. [CBS News]

    * Our mates at Legal Cheek have the ideal follow-up to our World Cup guide: Which last 16 World Cup team is your law firm? As a QPR fan, I’ll tip my hat to their Harry Redknapp quote. [Legal Cheeks]

    * Overpreparing for a simple meeting. [What Should Law Bros Call Me]

    * An 11th Circuit PIP nightmare. [South Florida Lawyers]

    * Hong Kong lawyers protesting what they see as China meddling. Honestly can you blame China? Ever since Hong Kong let Batman just swoop in and grab that guy, you can’t really trust the Hong Kong legal system. [Reuters]

    1 Comment / / Jun 27, 2014 at 4:27 PM
  • Donald Sterling

    Department of Justice, Election Law, Law Schools, Non-Sequiturs, Politics, Racism

    Non-Sequiturs: 06.19.14

    * Donald Sterling allegedly threatened to kill Shelly Sterling’s lawyer. Look Don, threatening to kill lawyers will certainly help your image, but you may be too far gone. [New York Daily News]

    * “Tagger arrested for tagging courtroom while awaiting prosecution for tagging.” [Lowering the Bar]

    * You know public law schools are more expensive today than in 1985. But just how much more expensive may absolutely shock you. [Lawyers, Guns & Money]

    * Law school tutor seems creepily excited about making students cry. [Sunshine and Potatoes]

    * 17 bizarre lawsuits. I don’t know, I view the people making sure I get every delicious inch of my meatball sub as heroes. [Crime Wire]

    * Dallas just threw its support behind reparations for slavery. Because obviously they didn’t bother to read the resolution. Democracy in action! [Gawker]

    * J. Christian Adams misunderstands an election law. This shocks me not at all. In the past, he complained to me that Pam Karlan didn’t understand voting rights based on a panel I covered. She’s now the Deputy Assistant Attorney General for Voting Rights and Adams is still spouting off (affiliate link) about how the DOJ is bending over to service the Black Panthers. [Election Law Blog]

    * Did you know the history of drones in America dates back to the Civil War? Well, now you do. And knowing is some proportion of the battle. Infographic below…. [Criminal Justice Degree Hub]

    1 Comment / / Jun 19, 2014 at 5:03 PM
  • Godzilla

    Death Penalty, Education / Schools, Election Law, Non-Sequiturs, Rape, Supreme Court

    Non-Sequiturs: 05.23.14

    Ed. note: Above the Law will not be publishing on Monday, May 26, in observance of the Memorial Day holiday.

    * Who cleans up after Godzilla rolls into town? I figure it’s Damage Control. [The Legal Geeks]

    * So we all know University of Texas Law admits politically-connected students with bad grades and scores. But did you know they let in someone with a 128 on the LSAT? ONE. TWENTY. EIGHT. [Watchdog.org]

    * Do we even need the Supreme Court? Well, that’s one way to get RBG to retire. [Huffington Post]

    * Seriously, the Boston Public School system is eliminating its history department. [Lawyers, Guns & Money]

    * Yesterday I talked about a devastating takedown of the latest National Review article contending that sexual assault is no big deal. Perhaps I crowned a champion too soon, because this is an even better whipping of that article. [Concurring Opinions]

    * Wait, ID laws ultimately suppress voter turnout? What a surprise! [Election Law Blog]

    * The last word in the death penalty debate after the jump… [The Onion]

    4 Comments / / May 23, 2014 at 1:13 PM