Google / Search Engines

  • patent-wars

    Google / Search Engines, Intellectual Property, Patents, Tax Law, Technology, Trademarks

    Thanks to Cool New Crowd-Sourcing Website, Now You Can Help Prevent Bogus Patents

    A new collaboration between Google, the USPTO, and Stack Exchange hopes to use crowd-sourcing to end America’s patent wars…

    11 Comments / / Sep 20, 2012 at 4:59 PM
  • David Lawee

    Bloomberg, Google / Search Engines, Intellectual Property, Patents, Quote of the Day

    Quote of the Day: How Has Google Managed to Be Asleep For So Long?

    In the wake of Apple v. Samsung, Google is learning a valuable (and dare we say obvious) lesson.

    13 Comments / / Sep 12, 2012 at 1:20 PM
  • craigslist_01

    California, Copyright, Craigslist, Google / Search Engines, Intellectual Property, Technology

    Why Does Craigslist Keep Suing People Who Want to Improve the Site?

    Craigslist doesn’t want to update its site, and it doesn’t want anyone else to try, either.

    19 Comments / / Aug 6, 2012 at 1:32 PM
  • phone

    Department of Justice, Facebook, Google / Search Engines, Insider Trading, Intellectual Property, Morning Docket, Technology, Trials

    Morning Docket: 08.01.12

    * In the Apple-Samsung trial yesterday, Apple’s attorneys accused Samsung of intentionally copying the iPhone. Samsung’s attorney was like, Bro, step off. And then Judge Lucy Koh and all the members of the gallery and the jury crowded around in a circle and started yelling Techno-fight! Techno fight! [Wall Street Journal]

    * Matthew Kluger, formerly of Wilson Sonsini and more recently convicted and sentenced to 12 years in prison for insider trading, gives an interview about what motivated him to commit his crimes. [Bloomberg]

    * France is not happy that Google did not delete all its Street View information from the country after it promised to. Shockingly, some parts of the world apparently still value data privacy. How quaint! [New York Times]

    * Former Perkins Coie partner Harold DeGraff must arbitrate his compensation battle with his former law firm. But the process will not have to be kept confidential. [Thomson Reuters]

    * I’m pretty sure at this point the DOJ is just consulting a Ouija board in its increasingly feeble attempts to prosecute Megaupload. [Wired /Threat Level]

    * UBS is not happy that it lost $356 million on the Facebook IPO. Now it’s suing NASDAQ over the snafu. [CNNMoney]

    4 Comments / / Aug 1, 2012 at 9:01 AM
  • Jeremy-Lin

    Basketball, Football, Gay, Gay Marriage, Google / Search Engines, Intellectual Property, Law Schools, Morning Docket, SCOTUS, Sex, Sex Scandals, Sports, Supreme Court, Technology, Trademarks

    Morning Docket: 06.25.12

    * It’s official: “law school grads face worst job market in more than 30 years.” Put that in your TTT pipe and smoke it. [Chicago Tribune]

    * Not sure how good of a “cyber spy” you can be if you’re getting sued in federal court for things like cybersquatting and trademark infringement. [MarketWatch]

    * Jerry Sandusky was convicted — oh Lord, he was convicted — Friday evening, and now his attorneys say they weren’t allowed to resign right before the trial. [CBS News]

    * The New York Times has caught Linsanity, or at least it has caught an interest in the trademark case for Jeremy Lin’s popular catchphrase. [New York Times]

    * It was Gay Pride weekend across the country. Practically speaking, for most people this meant lots of unexpected traffic jams and random glitter bombings. Evan Wolfson, a prominent attorney, was the Grand Marshal of the Chicago Pride Parade. [Chicago Sun-Times]

    * Will today be the day we get the Obamacare decision? Who knows. In the meantime, here’s an interview with the folks behind the wonderful SCOTUSblog. [Forbes]

    * The judge accused of elder abuse, in Alameda County, California, is still on the bench, but he has been relegated to handling small claims court. [Mercury News]

    * An owner of the Miami Heat has sued Google and a blogger over an “unflattering” photo. I guess once you win an NBA championship, it leaves you with a lot of free time for other important pursuits. [CNN]

    0 Comments / / Jun 25, 2012 at 9:07 AM
  • fast-and-furious

    Billable Hours, Eric Holder, Google / Search Engines, Health Care / Medicine, Non-Sequiturs, Politics, YouTube

    Non-Sequiturs: 06.20.12

    * Hyper-competitive weekend warrior kills himself racing down a mountain path and his family is suing the internet start-up that makes an app that allows you to track your time against other users. Is anybody making an app to track really stupid lawsuits filed by bereaved family members who receive terrible legal advice during times of crisis? [Not-So Private Parts / Forbes]

    * The Fast and the Furious Legal Edition: Executive of Privilege. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Bringing the billable hour to social media seems likely to make me cry. [Legal Cheek]

    * Former SCOTUS clerks think the individual mandate is done for. [Wonkblog / Washington Post]

    * Google threatens to bring the hammer down on YouTube to mp3 converter. [Torrent Freak]

    * Maybe this is the kind of alcohol you can buy with prestige points. [Urban Daddy]

    * The companies who will own the president if Romney wins. [USAToday]

    2 Comments / / Jun 20, 2012 at 6:31 PM
  • googlecar

    Cyberlaw, FCC, Google / Search Engines, Privacy, Technology

    Google Street View Project Under Fire For Gathering Unencrypted Wireless Data; So Much for Not Being Evil

    Google Street View is under fire again for, if not being evil necessarily, being significantly creepy.

    7 Comments / / Jun 13, 2012 at 2:16 PM
  • unemployed-law-grad

    10th Circuit, Free Speech, Google / Search Engines, Job Searches, Law School Deans, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Patents, Richard Posner, SCOTUS, Southern New England School of Law/Umass, Supreme Court, Technology, Unemployment, Wall Street

    Morning Docket: 06.08.12

    * Only 44% of Americans approve of how the Supreme Court is doing its job, but that’s probably because the other 56% wouldn’t know what the Supreme Court was unless the justices were contestants on a reality show. [New York Times]

    * Having nothing to do with the outcome of this Tenth Circuit appeal, apparently a juror in the underlying case had no idea when the First Amendment was adopted. As Bush II would say, is our children learning? [U.S. Tenth Circuit / FindLaw]

    * Who’s going to win the “Super Bowl” of Android patent trials? Nobody. Judge Richard Posner has issued a “tentative” order which noted that both sides of the Apple/Google case ought to be dismissed. [Reuters]

    * You should’ve “known better”: in case we didn’t make it abundantly clear when we spoke about NALP’s data for the class of 2011, the job market for new law grads is being classified as “brutal.” [National Law Journal]

    * U. Chicago Law revolutionized the field of law and economics, but much to their school’s, everyone else copied them. Now they’re thinking up new ways to do the same things. Gunners gotta gun. [Businessweek]

    * Say hello to Mary Lu Bilek, the woman who’s been appointed as the new dean of UMass Law. Hopefully she’s not keen on using school credit cards for personal spending like the last dean. [Wall Street Journal]

    * Occupy Wall Street protesters can’t sue NYC, its mayor, or its police commissioner, but they can sue the police. And with that news, “F**k tha Police” was sung in drum circles across the tri-state area. [Bloomberg]

    1 Comment / / Jun 8, 2012 at 9:05 AM
  • John Noble dark matters

    Biglaw, Google / Search Engines, john quinn, Libraries / Librarians, Technology, Weirdness

    Who Needs Billable Hours When You Have Mind Control?

    A twisted tale about what really goes on in your law firm library…

    12 Comments / / Jun 5, 2012 at 10:27 AM
  • No, not that gavel...

    1st Circuit, Attorney Misconduct, Bankruptcy, Biglaw, Copyright, Defamation, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Facebook, Gay, Google / Search Engines, Job Searches, Law Schools, Legal Ethics, Masturbation, Milberg Weiss, Morning Docket, Partner Issues, Video games

    Morning Docket: 06.01.12

    * Dewey retired partners with unfunded pensions get a seat at the table for this bankruptcy circus? Yeah, but only because the U.S. Trustee did something unheard of and appointed a committee of former partners as creditors. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Yesterday was definitely a great day to be gay on the east coast. In addition to the First Circuit’s DOMA decision, a New York appellate court ruled that being called gay is no longer defamatory per se. [New York Law Journal]

    * Milberg is the latest firm to dump Paul Ceglia of Facebook lawsuit fame, but Dean Boland, his other lawyer, says the Biglaw firm just “serve[d] as a distraction.” Somebody please give this man a dislike button. [Buffalo News]

    * Humblebrag of the day by Judge Alsup of Oracle v. Google fame: he’s written lines of code “a hundred times before.” He also squashed Oracle’s API copyright infringement claims like bugs. [Courthouse News Service]

    * Remember Kimberly Ireland, the Kansas attorney who falsely accused Judge Kevin Moriarty of waxing his gavel beneath the bench? She got a retroactive two-year suspension. [ABA Journal via Legal Profession Blog]

    * Elizabeth Warren has confirmed that she told Harvard Law and Penn Law that she was a Native American, but only after she had been hired. She didn’t get any action of the affirmative variety, no sir. [Associated Press]

    * Recent law school graduates are a little more desperate than we thought they were. At least 32 people have already applied for that BC Law job advertising a salary below minimum wage. [Boston Business Journal]

    * Activision settled a lawsuit with two Call of Duty developers, but isn’t worried about an effect on its financials due to a strong third quarter performance. And you can thank your damn Elite packages for that. [PCMag]

    2 Comments / / Jun 1, 2012 at 9:01 AM
  • Prostitution1

    Abortion, Exercise, Food, Google / Search Engines, John Edwards, Morning Docket, Patents, Pro Bono, Prostitution, Public Interest, Technology, Trials

    Morning Docket: 05.24.12

    * Secret Service Director Mark Sullivan apologized before a Senate panel for his agency’s prostitution scandal. We bet that you’d be “deeply disappointed” too if your employees were caught stiffing a hooker on her bill. [Miami Herald]

    * Day four of jury deliberations in the John Edwards campaign finance trial closed yesterday without a verdict. The former presidential candidate is probably just waiting to pack it in, get this jury declared hung, and call it a day. [CNN]

    * “This case is maybe something like a near disaster for Oracle.” A jury ruled unanimously that Google didn’t infringe Oracle’s Java patents in developing its Android software. Maybe they weren’t evil after all. [Bloomberg]

    * A record low of 41% of Americans call themselves “pro choice” when it comes to abortions, and only a little more than half think it should be legal under “certain circumstances.” What is this, Roe v. World? [Reuters]

    * Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman put together a task force to make recommendations on how to implement New York’s new pro bono prerequisite. Please let them take law school clinic hours. [Corporate Counsel]

    * Remember the lawyer who sued his posh fitness club over its failure to provide free breakfast? Not only is his suit now toast, but he also has to fork over some cash to the club’s lawyers. [New York Daily News]

    15 Comments / / May 24, 2012 at 9:04 AM
  • The Snooki Defense

    9th Circuit, Affirmative Action, Asians, Biglaw, Conferences / Symposia, Copyright, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Federal Judges, Harvard, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Murder, Technology, You Go Girl

    Morning Docket: 05.08.12

    * Aw, come on, Mort, Dewey really have to pay you $61M? In case you missed it last night, the only thing that made the former vice chairman’s departure memo dramatic was the insane amount that he claims he’s owed. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * Congratulations to Jacqueline H. Nguyen on her confirmation to the Ninth Circuit. She’s the first Asian American woman to sit on a federal appellate court, so she’s earned our judicial diva title (in a good way). You go girl! [Los Angeles Times]

    * Google might’ve infringed upon Oracle’s copyrights, but a jury couldn’t decide if it constituted fair use. Sorry, Judge Alsup, but with that kind of a decision, you can bet your ass that there’ll be an appeal. [New York Times]

    * A Harvard Law professor has come to Elizabeth Warren’s defense, claiming that an alleged affirmative action advantage played no role in her hiring. And besides, even if it did, it only played 1/32 of a role. [Boston Herald]

    * Classes at Cooley Law’s Tampa Bay campus began last night. Unsurprisingly, the inaugural class is double the size originally projected, because everyone wants to attend second-best school in the nation. [MLive.com]

    * Albany Law will be having a three-day conference on the legal implications of the Civil War. This could be a little more exciting if presenters wore reenactment garb and did battle when it was over. [National Law Journal]

    * Jury selection is underway in a second degree murder trial that will forever be known as the case where a defendant first raised the “Snooki Defense.” He didn’t kill his wife… but her spray tan did. [CBS Miami]

    7 Comments / / May 8, 2012 at 9:06 AM
  • Ekaterina Rybolovleva: 'But daddy, I want an $88M apartment now!'

    Bail, Biglaw, Blackberry-Crackberry, Cellphones, Copyright, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Divorce Train Wrecks, Google / Search Engines, Intellectual Property, Job Searches, John Edwards, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Politics, Real Estate, Technology, Trials

    Morning Docket: 04.23.12

    * No dowry, no problem: Dewey we have a suitor for this imploding Biglaw firm? Rumor has it that Greenberg Traurig was seen whispering sweet nothings into D&L’s ear about its possible interest. [Am Law Daily]

    * BlackBerry maker Research In Motion has hired Milbank Tweed to work out a restructuring plan. Just think, maybe if your product didn’t suck so hard, you wouldn’t be in this position in the first place. [Reuters]

    * Sex, money, and betrayal… it sounds like another failed TV series about lawyers on ABC, but in actuality, it’s just a preview of the John Edwards campaign finance trial set to begin this week. [Los Angeles Times]

    * Technophobes beware, because this copyright battle over code is getting serious. Oracle v. Google turned into Larry v. Larry in court last week as the CEOs for both companies gave testimony. [Bits / New York Times]

    * George Zimmerman thought he’d have to stay in jail longer because he was having trouble coming up with his bail money, but he was released in the dead of night. Bet he looked pretty suspicious. [CNN]

    * “There are [fewer students] coming in and crying. I haven’t had a crier yet, which I have had in the past.” Given the legal hiring market, that’s a real accomplishment for a career services official. [Charlotte Observer]

    * Who gives a sh*t? Not this Russian fertilizer tycoon. When you’re a billionaire, buying an $88M apartment for your kid is just a run-of-the-mill transaction. Come on, he’s not hiding his assets for his divorce. [Telegraph]

    4 Comments / / Apr 23, 2012 at 9:06 AM
  • Judge William Alsup

    Biglaw, California, Federal Judges, Google / Search Engines, Judge of the Day, Judicial Divas, Technology, Trials

    Judge of the Day: Don’t Even Think About ‘Hacking and Coughing’ in His Courtroom

    With proceedings in the “World Series” of high-tech law cases underway (aka Oracle v. Google), lawyers have discovered that the judge overseeing the matter is, well… kind of a hard-ass….

    18 Comments / / Apr 18, 2012 at 11:09 AM
  • megaupload-song-hits-big-on-the-web-umg-tries-to-take-it-down

    Biglaw, Copyright, Cyberlaw, Entertainment Law, Federal Government, Google / Search Engines, Intellectual Property, Legal Ethics, Litigators, Technology, William Burck, YouTube

    Quinn Emanuel Calls B.S. on Government Conflict-of-Interest Objection in Megaupload Case

    Quinn Emanuel lashes back at the government’s conflict of interest objection in the Megaupload case. What does QE have to say?

    11 Comments / / Apr 12, 2012 at 5:47 PM
  • Hotter than a real poison pill.

    Biglaw, Dick Cheney, Google / Search Engines, Mergers and Acquisitions, Morning Docket, Privacy, Real Estate, SCOTUS, Sex, Sex Scandals, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 03.22.12

    * I know you don’t want to be evil, but I don’t think “privacy” means what you think it means. Google users have filed a class action suit against the company in New York over its new complete and utter lack of privacy policy. [Bloomberg]

    * So you made some anti-war comments, touched Dick Cheney, got arrested, claimed your First Amendment rights were violated, and your case made it all the way to SCOTUS. Greatest accomplishment? Not getting shot by Cheney. [Huffington Post]

    * Whoa, whoa, whoa. You mean to tell me that Wachtell’s name partner, Martin Lipton, the man who created the “poison pill,” supports staggered boards? Consider my mind blown. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * M&A maven Dennis Block and real estate rock star Jeffrey Feil each donated $1M to their alma mater, Brooklyn Law School. See, you don’t need to go to a T14 school to make bank. [National Law Journal]

    * Protip: not even Dov Charney’s world-renowned creepiness can save you from an arbitration agreement. A former employees $260M sex slave suit has been tossed out of court. [New York Daily News]

    9 Comments / / Mar 22, 2012 at 9:07 AM
  • Cyberlaw, Election 2012, Google / Search Engines, Morning Docket, Politics, Privacy, Technology

    Morning Docket: 02.29.12

    * Remember Phillip Closius, the former dean of University of Baltimore Law, who said the university was raiding the law school’s funds? Yeah, he was totally right. Just guess what percent of the law school budget was going to the rest of the university. Starts with “A” and rhymes with “dot.” [National Law Journal]

    * The humanity! Oklahoma’s worst fears have come true; American judges are enforcing Sharia Law! Whatever are we going to do? There is no solution in sight — except to maybe stop overreacting… [CNN]

    * Mitt Bot won in both Arizona and Michigan last night. Can we send Santorum back to the 16th century yet? [The Washington Post]

    * Twenty-five suspected members of Anonymous were arrested across Europe and South America. They ain’t anonymous anymore. [New York Times]

    * In other cyberlaw news, Google’s new privacy policy not only stinks, it probably violates European Union law. Hey Google, don’t be evil! [New York Times]

    9 Comments / / Feb 29, 2012 at 9:04 AM
  • Stacey Blitsch Amanda Ryncarz small

    Defamation, Free Speech, Gloria Allred, Google / Search Engines, Harold Baer, Hotties, Romance and Dating, Rudeness, Sex, Sex Scandals, You Go Girl

    Lawyerly Lothario’s Lawsuit Against His Hot Exes Gets Tossed

    At the end of January, we brought you a detailed report on a lawsuit filed by former prosecutor and Court TV analyst Matthew Couloute Jr., who alleged that his ex-girlfriends had taken to the internet to let loose about his alleged infidelities. His exes’ scathing words were found on LiarsCheatersRUs, a website created to “save […]

    10 Comments / / Feb 21, 2012 at 12:21 PM

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