John Roberts

  • Scalia's buddy?

    Antonin Scalia, Barack Obama, Biglaw, Billable Hours, California, Football, Immigration, John Roberts, Litigators, Money, Morning Docket, Partner Issues, Racism, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 10.07.13

    * The Supreme Court’s Term opens today, and the conservative justices may have the opportunity to shift the law even further to the right when it comes to today’s social issues. [Los Angeles Times]

    * In his Biglaw days, Chief Justice Roberts “gave his adversaries heartburn.” Now, his litigation skills serve the same purpose for those giving oral arguments before SCOTUS. [National Law Journal]

    * It seems that in the end, Justice Ginsburg’s career choices have been whittled down to the lyrics found in one of The Clash’s catchiest songs: Should she stay or should she go now? [Washington Post]

    * In other news, in case you were wondering, Justice Antonin Scalia, a firm believer in the Devil, is just as scary in real life as he is when he haunts your dreams (which is impressive!). [New York Magazine]

    * “If this continues, it’s going to be very problematic.” Clients are very annoyed, and some Biglaw firms continue to worry about how the government shutdown will affect their bottom line. [New York Law Journal]

    * The defections at night, are big and bright, deep in the heart of Texas: Weil Gotshal’s Houston office is still leaking partners like a sieve. We’ll have more on these developments later today. [Law360 (sub. req.)]

    * President Obama continues to comment on the important issues of the day. He’d “think about changing” the Redskins team name if he were its owner — just like this fired Quinn Emanuel associate. [CNN]

    * Viva la raza! The federal government is too slow for California, so the governor signed a bill into law that will allow illegal immigrants to become licensed as lawyers. Congratulations to Sergio Garcia. [Reuters]

    * No, we won’t remove that embarrassing story we wrote about you — but at least we’re not trying to charge you hundreds of dollars for their removal like those pesky mug shot websites. [New York Times]

    10 Comments / / Oct 7, 2013 at 9:04 AM
  • HI-YA, JUDGE!

    2nd Circuit, Biglaw, Department of Justice, Education / Schools, Enron, Football, H. Rodgin Cohen, John Roberts, Law Schools, Media and Journalism, Money, Morning Docket, Police, State Judges

    Morning Docket: 08.20.13

    * Chief Justice John Roberts appointed Second Circuit Judge José A. Cabranes to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court of Review. Roberts must be happy; few will criticize a moderate. [Washington Post]

    * The Department of Justice plans to hire Leslie Caldwell, Morgan Lewis partner and ex-Enron prosecutor, to fill Lanny Breuer’s shoes. Way to leak the news while she’s on vacation. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * Tell us again how sequestration isn’t having an impact on the judiciary. Private federal indigent defense attorneys are going to see their already modest rates slashed due to budget cuts. [National Law Journal]

    * Sixteen lawyers will receive the New York Law Journal’s Lifetime Achievement Award, and a list like this obviously wouldn’t be complete without the names of some of Biglaw’s best and brightest. Congrats, Rodge! [New York Law Journal]

    * Thomas D. Raffaele, the judge who was karate chopped in the throat by a police officer last summer, is now suing over his crushed larynx and similarly squashed constitutional rights. [Courthouse News Service]

    * Future gunners, unite! If you’re set on becoming a lawyer, there are things you can do to prepare your law school application, even as a college freshman. [Law Admissions Lowdown / U.S. News & World Report]

    * Here’s something to aspire to for the ongoing law school lawsuits: Career Education Corp., a system of for-profit colleges, will pay $10 million to settle a dispute over its inflated job statistics. [Wall Street Journal]

    * Penn State University is starting to issue settlement offers to young men who claim they were sexually abused at the hands of Jerry Sandusky, the school’s former assistant football coach. [Legal Intelligencer]

    4 Comments / / Aug 20, 2013 at 9:11 AM
  • summer beach ball summer associate event contest

    4th Circuit, American Bar Association / ABA, Biglaw, Conferences / Symposia, Copyright, Federal Judges, Gay Marriage, Immigration, John Roberts, Morning Docket, Pornography, SCOTUS, Summer Associates, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 08.08.13

    * “[J]ust because something is constitutional doesn’t mean it’s the best idea, or even a good one.” Perhaps we’ve given Chief Justice John Roberts a little too much to do. No wonder he’s gotten cranky. [Opinionator / New York Times]

    * “It’s raining lawsuits.” As Justice Scalia predicted, in the wake of the Supreme Court’s ruling in the Windsor case, gay couples across the nation have banded together to challenge bans on same-sex marriage. [NBC News]

    * The Fourth Circuit ruled that state authorities in Maryland can’t arrest and detain people just because they look like they might be illegal immigrants. They can only do that in Arizona. [Baltimore Sun]

    * No more fun during sequestration, ever! Judges, get ready to kiss your “lavish accommodations” at judicial conferences goodbye, because Senator Tom Coburn is on the case. [National Law Journal]

    * For all of the talk that Biglaw is in recovery, summer associate hiring just isn’t what it used to be. Summer class sizes shrank since last year. We’ll have more on this later today. [Am Law Daily]

    * On Friday, the ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar will consider making changes to its law school accreditation standards. Yes, the ABA does have standards. [ABA Journal]

    * Open wide and suck this down: A film on the life and times of porn star Linda Lovelace may be lost to the cutting room floor because Deep Throat’s rights holders are seeking an injunction. [The Guardian]

    9 Comments / / Aug 8, 2013 at 9:04 AM
  • 220px-Sen_Chuck_Grassley_official-RF

    Akin Gump, D.C. Circuit, Federal Judges, John Roberts, Politics

    D.C. Circuit Underworked, Say Anonymous Letters Possibly From Federal Judges

    Senator Grassley asks federal judges to rat out their colleagues. Should the D.C. Circuit be run like a fast food restaurant comment box?

    11 Comments / / Aug 2, 2013 at 12:28 PM
  • The new mascot for the Roberts Court's jurisprudence.

    John Roberts, Law School Deans, Law Schools, Music, Non-Sequiturs, Religion, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    Non-Sequiturs: 07.02.13

    * Another interpretation of the Shelby County decision posits that the Roberts Court is a lot like the Walking Dead, just less entertaining. [Huffington Post]

    * Dean David Schizer is leaving. [The Faculty Lounge]

    * Missouri tried to “save Christmas” from heathens, but had its efforts stymied when the governor realized it could literally set the state on fire. [Volokh Conspiracy]

    * Cardinal Dolan, America’s most prominent Catholic bishop, apparently shifted Church assets to keep them from falling into the hands of abuse victims. Perhaps he could have exerted the same effort keeping abuse victims out of the hands of abusers? [NY Times]

    * It looks like a Paul Weiss associate, Molissa Farber, is still alive in the $1,000 No-Limit event at the World Series of Poker. Maybe she’ll be able to pay off her loans sooner rather than later. [Poker News]

    * Did you enjoy Milli Vanilli? Perhaps you’d like watching air guitar? The national semifinals are in New York tonight. [Bowery Ballroom]

    3 Comments / / Jul 2, 2013 at 5:35 PM
  • marriage equality

    9th Circuit, Antonin Scalia, Ballard Spahr, Biglaw, California, Election Law, Elena Kagan, Gay, Gay Marriage, John Roberts, Law Firm Mergers, Minority Issues, Morning Docket, Patton Boggs, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 07.01.13

    * Who is the real John Roberts? Will he forever be known as health care reform’s savior, or the man who disregarded precedent to gut minority voting rights? Hell if we know, so we’ll let you be the judge. [Opinionator / New York Times]

    * The man may be a mystery, but one thing’s for sure when it comes to Chief Justice Roberts: it’s fair to say that at this point, he’d sincerely appreciate it if his colleagues would kindly STFU during oral argument. [Big Story / Associated Press]

    * Elena Kagan, a justice who was never a judge, is now being praised for her ability to put the law into terms that non-lawyers can understand. That’s a score for law professors everywhere. [New York Times]

    * In terms of the Voting Rights Act, while the chances of the current Congress enacting a universal voting law are approximately nil, there are other effective avenues that could be taken. [New York Times]

    * On Friday, the Ninth Circuit lifted the stay on gay marriages in California, and less than 24 hours later, Prop 8 supporters filed an emergency motion with SCOTUS to stop all of the weddings. Lovely. [NPR]

    * Meanwhile, ex-judge Vaughn Walker thinks Justice Scalia’s having joined the high court’s majority on standing telegraphed the fact that he didn’t have votes to uphold Prop 8 as constitutional. [NPR]

    * Rubber stamp this: Judges on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court are so upset that they’re being made out as government patsies that they’re talking to the press about it. [Washington Post]

    * Whether you think Chevron is “suing [Patton Boggs] lawyers for litigating” or for promoting fraud that “shocks the conscience,” here’s a summary of what’s going on in an epic case. [Washington Post]

    * Got a high-profile criminal defense firm? Look out, because you may have captured Biglaw’s eye. Take, for example, Stillman & Friedman, which will be merging with Ballard Spahr. [New York Times]

    * Apparently being in your mid-50s is a “good time to [retire]” for law deans who pull in six figures. Ken Randall, outgoing dean of Alabama Law, says he’s “really ready for the next challenge.” [AL.com]

    9 Comments / / Jul 1, 2013 at 9:08 AM
  • So I says to Mabel, I says, "how do I avoid the Rule Against Perpetuities?"

    Department of Justice, Election Law, John Roberts, Labor / Employment, Non-Sequiturs, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, UVA Law

    Non-Sequiturs: 06.28.13

    * Half-Law office, Half-Barbershop. That makes sense, I’ve seen some haircuts that should be crimes. We hear they even have a $5 haircut special called “The Misdemeanor.” [New Britain Herald]

    * The editors of Ramblings on Appeal give their takes on Shelby County. Rarely has truer legal analysis been offered than characterizing Roberts’s decision as, “Oh and I have five people on my side, you only have four, so take that.” [Ramblings on Appeal]

    * UVA law professor Chris Sprigman has co-authored an op-ed calling out the NSA. Oh, that guy’s phone is getting tapped. [New York Times]

    * The Expert Institute continues to draw from popular culture to coach expert testimony. This time it’s Game of Thrones. It’s a handy set of lessons, but “Never Trust a Frey” deserved mention. [The Expert Institute]

    * The Justice Department is bringing on unpaid attorneys because slave labor is awesome and unpaid internships are never elitist and discriminatory. [Pro Publica]

    * On that note, Bar President calls for an end to unpaid 3L internships. Video after the jump…

    5 Comments / / Jun 28, 2013 at 5:12 PM
  • Baby-with-Rainbow-Flag

    California, Crime, Federal Government, Gay, Gay Marriage, Health Care / Medicine, Immigration, John Roberts, Law Professors, Law Schools, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Texas, Violence

    Morning Docket: 06.28.13

    * Do you think Chief Justice Roberts is the Supreme Court’s “peacemaker”? To be fair, at least he does a better job of tempering all of his judicial rage than his colleagues. [Politico]

    * According to Prof. John Eastman of Chapman Law, the SCOTUS decision striking down DOMA means Prop 8 is good law in California. Try and wrap your mind around that one. [OC Weekly]

    * The Senate approved a bipartisan immigration reform plan with a 68-32 vote, and now it’s up to House representatives to take the bill and summarily wipe their asses with it. [Wall Street Journal (sub. req.)]

    * The good folks at Hobby Lobby quilted for hours yesterday to celebrate the Tenth Circuit’s reversal of a lower court’s denial of an injunction blocking the ACA’s contraceptives mandate. [The Oklahoman]

    * Texas A&M still hopes to acquire Texas Weslyan’s law school; they’re just waiting for the ABA to look over the paperwork. Welcome, Texas A&M Law, since the takeover will obviously be approved. [WTAW]

    * Boston bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has been indicted on 30 counts of violence and weapons-related charges. Right now, he’s looking at a possibility of life in prison or the death penalty. [CNN]

    10 Comments / / Jun 28, 2013 at 9:12 AM
  • Supreme Court portrait 2013

  • The front of the Supreme Court building: 'Equal Justice Under Law.' (Click to enlarge.)

    Anthony Kennedy, Antonin Scalia, California, Constitutional Law, Gay, Gay Marriage, John Roberts, Lesbians, Paul Clement, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    The Supreme Court Holds That It Is Unconstitutional For The Government To Hate Gay People

    What was it like to be at the Supreme Court this morning, when two major rulings on gay marriage were handed down? A report from SCOTUS columnist Matt Kaiser.

    26 Comments / / Jun 26, 2013 at 12:06 PM
  • Rainbow_flag_and_blue_skies

    Anthony Kennedy, California, Constitutional Law, David Boies, Gay, Gay Marriage, John Roberts, Lesbians, SCOTUS, Stephen Reinhardt, Supreme Court, Ted Olson

    The Supreme Court Rules In Two Major Gay Marriage Cases

    Finally! The Supreme Court’s long-awaited rulings on gay marriage in California and the Defense of Marriage Act. What did the Court rule?

    49 Comments / / Jun 26, 2013 at 10:41 AM
  • Supreme Court SCOTUS photo by David Lat

  • Supreme Court SCOTUS photo by David Lat

    Constitutional Law, Election Law, John Roberts, Minority Issues, Politics, Racism, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    Supreme Court Rules That Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act Is Unconstitutional

    Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act has been struck down. Is there anything left?

    128 Comments / / Jun 25, 2013 at 10:45 AM
  • Supreme Court SCOTUS photo by David Lat

    Antonin Scalia, Constitutional Law, Elena Kagan, Guns / Firearms, John Roberts, Prostitution, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    The Supreme Court Provides Aid To Disaffected Teenagers And Groups Working With Prostitutes

    Today the Supreme Court issued three opinions. Listen up if you’re a disaffected teenager, a felon with a gun, or someone who has signed an arbitration agreement.

    8 Comments / / Jun 20, 2013 at 1:47 PM
  • 'I see angry journalists in your future.'

    Affirmative Action, John Roberts, Quote of the Day, SCOTUS, Supreme Court

    No Fisher Opinion? Blame the Supreme Court’s Astrologer!

    Will the stars be properly aligned next week? We can only hope!

    13 Comments / / Jun 20, 2013 at 11:50 AM
  • Supreme Court portrait 2013

  • bored-lawyer

    5th Circuit, Attorney Misconduct, Bar Exams, Biglaw, California, Divorce Train Wrecks, Edith Jones, John Roberts, Legal Ethics, Morning Docket, Patents, Pro Bono, SCOTUS, Supreme Court, Women's Issues

    Morning Docket: 06.14.13

    * When SCOTUS cases involve public companies and rulings are misinterpreted, it can lead to some pretty volatile stock performance, as was evidenced by yesterday’s highs and lows for Myriad Genetics of BRCA1 patent fame. [Washington Post]

    * The ethics complaint against Judge Edith Jones of the Fifth Circuit has been transferred to the D.C. Circuit after receiving a blessing from the Chief Justice of the United States. Uh oh, that’s serious business if Roberts is involved. [Times-Picayune]

    * The number of women working in the NLJ 350 is sad. They make up only one-third of all attorneys working in Biglaw, and we’re stuck celebrating the tiniest positive changes. Sigh. [National Law Journal]

    * Proskauer Rose’s former CFO, Elly Rosenthal, settled her $10M disability discrimination suit against the firm in anticlimactic fashion, “without costs to any party as against the others.” [Am Law Daily]

    * California is obviously trying to one-up New York with this one. In addition to a 50-hour pro bono requirement, they’re pushing for 15 hours of real-world training before bar admission. [The Recorder]

    * Try to stop a man from throwing a pie in your husband’s face and in return you’ll be served with your wifely walking papers a few years later. Aww, Rupert Murdoch is such a kind old man. [Bloomberg]

    2 Comments / / Jun 14, 2013 at 9:04 AM
  • Dred Scott

    Affirmative Action, Blogging, D.C. Circuit, Job Searches, John Roberts, Non-Sequiturs, U.S. News

    Non-Sequiturs: 06.03.13

    * Slave law is still considered “good law” by the courts? Originalism is alive and well! [Post & Found]

    * For the first time ever, the Washington Post’s scavenger hunt/riddle/prove how pretentious we are competition was won by a single individual. Congratulations to Sullivan and Cromwell’s Sean Memon, an ’08 Duke grad, who prevailed after figuring out that nothing was happening. That makes sense when you read the article. [Constitutional Daily]

    * Here’s an argument against affirmative action based on the premise that black people at the barest of margins may be hindered by having too good of a résumé. This is, well, wrong, but much more intellectual than the arguments against affirmative action advanced by the Chief Justice. [Ramblings on Appeal]

    * A San Diego lawyer is seeking a young attorney in L.A. to work for slightly more than peanuts. But the requirements are entertaining, like confidence that “you are going to be the next F. Lee Baily or Johnny Cochran.” The poster is also an “elderly gay man (late 50′s).” Is that really elderly anymore? [Craigslist]

    * More on the problems facing the D.C. Circuit. Probably a good reason to shrink the complement of the Circuit. [SSRN]

    * Another look at the business benefits of blogging. Get out there, people! [Likelihood of Confusion]

    * Hey there, lawyers! The Wall Street Journal would like you to know that you and your ilk are responsible for the student loan bailout. Video after ye olde jump…

    11 Comments / / Jun 3, 2013 at 5:15 PM