Sentencing Law

  • Osmar_Schindler_David_und_Goliath

    Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 05.13.15

    * The New Jersey legislature is considering a law decriminalizing slingshots. Finally, New Jersey’s leaders looked at a map and realized the word “Philadelphia” looks suspiciously like “Philistines.” [NJ.com]

    * The case for drone-based graffiti. People have complained of drones invading the privacy of innocents for a while now and nothing’s happened. Now that drones can deface corporate property, what do you bet regulation comes fast and furious. [The Legal Artist]

    * Over a quarter of Harvard Law grads don’t practice law. [Tax Prof Blog]

    * Sentencing reform may be coming, but that’s not going to keep private prison companies from raking in the cash. [Sentencing Law and Policy]

    * Professor Campos on the role of government subsidies on the rising cost of higher education. [Lawyers, Guns & Money]

    * As a follow-up, here are even more tips for 0Ls researching law schools. [Law and More]

    * A legal analysis of Avengers: Age of Ultron. Apparently creating a genocidal death machine is not frowned upon as much in the Marvel Universe as it might be here. [Law and the Multiverse]

    12 Comments / / May 13, 2015 at 5:06 PM
  • And by 'work,' I mean 'intern' this summer.

    Morning Docket

    Morning Docket: 04.14.15

    * Georgetown Law is teaming up with DLA Piper and Arent Fox to open a low bono law firm. The firm will provide two things for those in need: affordable legal services and jobs to bolster GULC’s employment stats. [Am Law Daily]

    * Michigan Law will provide summer funding for all of its 1Ls for law-related internships — but there’s a catch. The cash is a loan, and students may have to pay it back if they earn Biglaw money the following summer. [Michigan Law]

    * Judge Jed Rakoff sounded off on the judicary’s problem with mass incarceration at a recent conference at Harvard Law, calling for his colleagues and bar associations across the nation to take a stand for the accused with a gentler justice system. [Big Law Business / Bloomberg BNA]

    * “It’s positive news. I think it indicates there’s some slight opening of financial services to marijuana-related businesses.” Some banks have finally decided to provide services to weedpreneurs, but others are leaving marijuana moguls high and dry. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * “Students should seriously consider going to law school in a state where they plan to practice law.” Unless you like wasting your time, you’d do well to listen to this advice, even if you’re going to a school with national name recognition. [U.S. News & World Report]

    42 Comments / / Apr 14, 2015 at 9:05 AM
  • Jodi Arias

    Murder, Sentencing Law

    Breaking: Jodi Arias Gets Sentenced

    What could be the final chapter in the Jodi Arias story has finally been written.

    26 Comments / / Apr 13, 2015 at 1:55 PM
  • Justice Clarence Thomas

    Morning Docket

    Morning Docket: 02.18.15

    * Could it be? Did Justice Clarence Thomas ask a question during oral arguments at SCOTUS? No, but he did ask a question at Yale Law during a presentation, noting that he doesn’t ask “irrelevant, useless questions” at the high court. [Legal Times]

    * Per NALP, gains were made by women and minorities in law firms for the first time in years, but be careful, because Jim Leipold is watching you: “Individual law firms should not be allowed to hide behind the national figures.” [National Law Journal]

    * Meet Judge Robert C. Brack of the District Court of New Mexico, who recently earned quite the accolade. Judge Brack has sentenced more defendants than any other federal judge in the past five years. He won’t be celebrating his achievement. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * This Georgetown Law professor, who happens to be the cofounder of one of the country’s largest litigation finance firms, wants to see a law firm IPO, but others wonder if lawyers would be able to ethically practice while reporting to shareholders. [Washington Post]

    * A Chadbourne & Park employee has been banned from ever working for another law firm again following his theft of $15,360 from C&P’s coffers. Not to worry, no client money was pilfered from the firm — the cash was taken from an open office account. [Am Law Daily]

    * If you haven’t heard, David Lat wrote a book called Supreme Ambitions (affiliate link), and “[w]riting the novel was almost therapeutic for [him] in a way” — he’s “kind of over” the fact that his résumé doesn’t include a SCOTUS clerkship. [Chicago Daily Law Bulletin]

    * Martha Africa, name partner of Major Lindsey & Africa, RIP. [San Francisco Chronicle]

    17 Comments / / Feb 18, 2015 at 9:03 AM
  • Barrett Brown

    Free Speech, Media and Journalism, Technology

    Can You Be Prosecuted For Sharing A Link? The Troubling Case Of Barrett Brown

    The prosecution of a prominent activist and journalist raises very real and serious First Amendment concerns.

    30 Comments / / Jan 23, 2015 at 8:06 PM
  • rock concert

    Non-Sequiturs

    Non-Sequiturs: 01.14.15

    * Judge really, really works hard to make classic rock references in this opinion. Guess he Can’t Get Enough of his Rock ‘n Roll Fantasy. [South Florida Lawyers]

    * Trouble in paradise? Well, no. But trouble in D.C.: American University law professor accuses George Washington Law of predatory poaching. [TaxProf Blog]

    * America should offer a $200 tax credit for political contributions. As always, you can buy more tax loopholes with higher contributions. [Los Angeles Times]

    * Baby justices are hatching from their eggs. [The Onion]

    * New York City Council member is looking to cap Uber’s surge pricing at 2x. Or, you know, people could use the function on the app that tells you how much you’re going to be charged. [Gawker]

    * Continuing analysis of the California Bar Exam results. In case you were wondering how the correspondence and distance learning schools performed. [Bar Exam Stats]

    * The Supreme Court hands down an interesting sentencing law opinion today. Finally, I got a FantasySCOTUS prediction (mostly) right! [Sentencing Law and Policy]

    * If lowly work were considered cool, we wouldn’t have all those annoying stereotypes sitting next to us. [Law and More]

    1 Comment / / Jan 14, 2015 at 5:35 PM
  • Judge Jed Rakoff

    Crime, Sentencing Law, White-Collar Crime

    Overpunishment, Rationality, And Rakoff

    A look at one federal judge’s proposal to reform the criminal justice system and the responses it has generated.

    32 Comments / / Jan 8, 2015 at 10:14 AM
  • David Schwimmer

    Morning Docket

    Morning Docket: 12.22.14

    * Florida Judge Cynthia Imperato was “devastated” after a jury found her guilty of DUI and reckless driving charges, but we imagine the judge may be more devastated by the fact that she’s a sitting judge who’s been sentenced to 20 days of house arrest. [Florida Sun Sentinel]

    * David Schwimmer, best known for his role as Ross on Friends, has been cast as lawyer Robert Kardashian in an O.J. Simpson true crime television miniseries. He surely knows it’ll take a lot of “unagi” to play the role just right. [Rolling Stone]

    * If you have to debt finance your J.D., you’re going to in for a rude awakening when you graduate and the loans start coming due. FYI, “lot[s] of graduates [are] buried in private student loan debt with not enough income to repay it.” [Forbes]

    * The parents of James Holmes, who’s better known as the alleged shooter in the Aurora movie theater massacre, have begged for him to be spared the death penalty ahead of his trial, but prosecutors say that in this case, “justice is death.” [Denver Post]

    * When it comes to Russia, “[a] lot of firms are thinking about pulling out.” That’s what she would’ve said if she were a managing partner. Biglaw firms that have been rocked by the ruble’s ruin are telling lawyers to leave before they’re laid off. [Am Law Daily]

    * Binder & Binder, the National Social Security Disability Advocates® whose late-night TV commercials you’ve grown to love, has filed for bankruptcy. The firm’s headcount will likely drop by more than half because of this. Yikes! [WSJ Law Blog]

    26 Comments / / Dec 22, 2014 at 9:11 AM
  • High Speed

    6th Circuit, Biglaw, Books, Cars, Crime, Edwards Wildman, Federal Judges, Gay Marriage, Jeffrey Toobin, Law Schools, Layoffs, Morning Docket, SCOTUS, Sentencing Law, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 11.07.14

    * As mentioned earlier, the Sixth Circuit upheld same-sex marriage bans in four states. Judge Martha Craig Daughtrey’s dissent is a very fun read because it’s dripping with sarcasm. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Sentencing has been delayed for Dzhokar Tsarnaev’s friends during the pendency of the Yates case at SCOTUS. Like a grouper, a backpack may not be a “tangible object.” [National Law Journal]

    * Bingham McCutchen and Edwards Wildman Palmer are planning to shed lawyers and staff members in anticipation of their proposed mergers with Morgan Lewis and Locke Lord. Ouch. [Am Law Daily]

    * Weekend reading? ATL’s managing editor, David Lat, reviews Blindfolds Off (affiliate link), an interesting collection of interviews with judges about how they decide their toughest cases. [Wall Street Journal]

    * Everyone, please stop what you’re doing. Jeffrey Toobin has discovered that law schools are in trouble, and he’s on the case. You can read more information about this new phenomenon here. [The New Yorker]

    * Adam Tang, the man who drove a 26-mile loop around Manhattan in 24 minutes, was convicted of reckless driving without being present. Check out the video of his crazy drive, after the jump. [ABA Journal]

    17 Comments / / Nov 7, 2014 at 9:00 AM
  • Jodi Arias

    Bankruptcy, Biglaw, Crime, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Law School Deans, Law Schools, Money, Morning Docket, Partner Issues, Sentencing Law, Trials

    Morning Docket: 10.31.14

    * Many lawyers may think that Biglaw is in recovery what with its record gross revenues and profits, but if you adjust the numbers for inflation, the overall picture looks pretty grim. Reality certainly does bite, folks. [American Lawyer]

    * Please pay up and shut up: Alas, seven partners who sought to dismiss the clawback suits filed against them by failed firm Dewey & LeBoeuf’s bankruptcy liquidation trustee were denied in court this week. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Thomas Jefferson School of Law restructured its debt to avoid default, and now its dean has announced he doesn’t think the school’s enrollment will ever return to its former glory. Aww. [National Law Journal]

    * Warren Gladders, the WUSTL Law grad turned bank robber, received 45 years in jail for his getaway shootout with the cops. It’ll run consecutively with his 24-year robbery sentence. [St. Louis Post Dispatch]

    * The judge overseeing the Jodi Arias sentencing retrial made the unusual decision to bar the public from watching the testimony of the defense’s first witness. We’re now awaiting Nancy Grace’s anuerysm. [AP]

    6 Comments / / Oct 31, 2014 at 9:04 AM
  • Jodi Arias

    Barack Obama, Biglaw, Death Penalty, Gay Marriage, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Real Estate, SCOTUS, Sentencing Law, Supreme Court, Trials

    Morning Docket: 10.21.14

    * When asked what his favorite SCOTUS decision was during his POTUS tenure, Obama said it was the high court’s cert denials on the gay marriage cases. Well played, sir. [Wall Street Journal]

    * “Leverage has started to shift away from law firms.” Despite the fact that their headcounts are rising, Biglaw firms are downsizing office space as rents keep climbing higher. [Am Law Daily]

    * Schools are trying to slap lipstick on the pig that legal education has become amid an “anemic job market.” We bet your law school has some shiny new innovations too. [News Observer]

    * Citing the fact that “the courts do not exist to win popularity contests,” a judge sentenced Oscar Pistorius to five years in prison. Serious question: Will he be allowed to bring his prosthetic legs? [New York Times]

    * Nancy Grace and her friends have pitchforks at the ready because Jodi Arias’s penalty phase retrial begins today, and another jury will decide if she deserves to die for murdering her boyfriend. [Reuters]

    28 Comments / / Oct 21, 2014 at 8:53 AM
  • prison prisoner jail convicted criminal

    Antonin Scalia, Sentencing Law, Supreme Court, White-Collar Crime

    The Supreme Court Lets You Go To Prison (Longer) For What You Weren’t Convicted Of

    This week, the Supreme Court had a chance to fix it. It didn’t.

    7 Comments / / Oct 16, 2014 at 10:05 AM
  • Amanda Bynes

    Celebrities, Crime, Drugs, Health Care / Medicine, Job Searches, Law Schools, Marijuana, Morning Docket, Sentencing Law

    Morning Docket: 10.14.14

    * Law schools are in trouble, but Cooley Law is “going strong” — after all, only “28 percent of last year’s graduates at its Michigan campuses failed to land jobs as lawyers within nine months.” You’re really doing it wrong. [Tampa Bay Times]

    * This guy broke into the University of Oregon School of Law three times, and all he got were these computers for hipsters and a crappy 11-year sentence. (He should’ve broken into the football facility for better loot.) [Register-Guard]

    * Should you go to law school if you know for a fact that you don’t want to be a lawyer? This is the type of question that would render your ATL editors unable to even. [Law Admissions Lowdown / U.S. News]

    * Amanda Bynes has been placed on a 5150 psychiatric hold, and people suddenly care about mental health law. It’s sad that it takes a celebrity to make people care about these issues. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Marijuana is making its way to the ballot in some states this November, but before you vote, here’s a primer on where it’s legal to smoke weed, where it might be, and where it’s not. [Washington Post]

    12 Comments / / Oct 14, 2014 at 9:08 AM
  • Justice Joan Orie Melvin

    9th Circuit, American Bar Association / ABA, Art, Biglaw, Blogging, Gay, Gay Marriage, Gender, Legal Ethics, Morning Docket, Partner Issues, Sentencing Law, State Judges, Tax Law

    Morning Docket: 10.08.14

    * How are Nevada and Idaho officials reacting to yesterday’s Ninth Circuit ruling striking down gay marriage bans in those states, and how soon might marriages get underway? [BuzzFeed]

    * In other LGBT legal news, New York City is likely to make it easier for transgender individuals to amend their birth certificates. [New York Times]

    * Good news for Joan Orie Melvin, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court justice turned convicted felon: her unorthodox sentence has been stayed (again). [How Appealing]

    * Eduardo Leite, who has led Baker & McKenzie since 2010, gets another two years at the helm of Biglaw’s biggest firm. [American Lawyer]

    * Cravath associate Micaela McMurrough scores a victory in tax court for artists. [New York Times]

    * The ABA has issued a new opinion addressing ethical issues raised during the sale of a law practice. [American Bar Association]

    * Why do lawyers blog? Tim Baran of Rocket Matter talks to 23 of us. [Legal Productivity]

    3 Comments / / Oct 8, 2014 at 8:59 AM
  • She's coming down with a bad case of "going to get a pony."

    Crime, DUI / DWI, Sentencing Law

    The Affluenza Kid And Privilege (This Time The Evidentiary Kind)

    The Affluenza controversy was messed up enough. Now the kid’s lawyers are trying to use another kind of privilege to keep his diagnosis from coming up in a civil case.

    8 Comments / / Aug 6, 2014 at 1:35 PM
  • Jodi Arias

  • syringe lethal injection death penalty Above the Law legal tabloid

    Alex Kozinski, Crime, Death Penalty, Sentencing Law

    Is The Death Penalty Worth It?

    Can we stomach the splatter? Conservative columnist Tamara Tabo argues that the death penalty isn’t worth defending.

    29 Comments / / Jul 24, 2014 at 4:00 PM
  • prison prisoner jail convicted criminal

    Crime, Federal Judges, Sentencing Law

    Qui Tam: District Court

    What is it like to attend a sentencing in federal court?

    2 Comments / / Jul 22, 2014 at 2:18 PM