Sentencing Law

  • High Speed

    6th Circuit, Biglaw, Books, Cars, Crime, Edwards Wildman, Federal Judges, Gay Marriage, Jeffrey Toobin, Law Schools, Layoffs, Morning Docket, SCOTUS, Sentencing Law, Supreme Court

    Morning Docket: 11.07.14

    * As mentioned earlier, the Sixth Circuit upheld same-sex marriage bans in four states. Judge Martha Craig Daughtrey’s dissent is a very fun read because it’s dripping with sarcasm. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Sentencing has been delayed for Dzhokar Tsarnaev’s friends during the pendency of the Yates case at SCOTUS. Like a grouper, a backpack may not be a “tangible object.” [National Law Journal]

    * Bingham McCutchen and Edwards Wildman Palmer are planning to shed lawyers and staff members in anticipation of their proposed mergers with Morgan Lewis and Locke Lord. Ouch. [Am Law Daily]

    * Weekend reading? ATL’s managing editor, David Lat, reviews Blindfolds Off (affiliate link), an interesting collection of interviews with judges about how they decide their toughest cases. [Wall Street Journal]

    * Everyone, please stop what you’re doing. Jeffrey Toobin has discovered that law schools are in trouble, and he’s on the case. You can read more information about this new phenomenon here. [The New Yorker]

    * Adam Tang, the man who drove a 26-mile loop around Manhattan in 24 minutes, was convicted of reckless driving without being present. Check out the video of his crazy drive, after the jump. [ABA Journal]

    17 Comments / / Nov 7, 2014 at 9:00 AM
  • Jodi Arias

    Bankruptcy, Biglaw, Crime, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Law School Deans, Law Schools, Money, Morning Docket, Partner Issues, Sentencing Law, Trials

    Morning Docket: 10.31.14

    * Many lawyers may think that Biglaw is in recovery what with its record gross revenues and profits, but if you adjust the numbers for inflation, the overall picture looks pretty grim. Reality certainly does bite, folks. [American Lawyer]

    * Please pay up and shut up: Alas, seven partners who sought to dismiss the clawback suits filed against them by failed firm Dewey & LeBoeuf’s bankruptcy liquidation trustee were denied in court this week. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Thomas Jefferson School of Law restructured its debt to avoid default, and now its dean has announced he doesn’t think the school’s enrollment will ever return to its former glory. Aww. [National Law Journal]

    * Warren Gladders, the WUSTL Law grad turned bank robber, received 45 years in jail for his getaway shootout with the cops. It’ll run consecutively with his 24-year robbery sentence. [St. Louis Post Dispatch]

    * The judge overseeing the Jodi Arias sentencing retrial made the unusual decision to bar the public from watching the testimony of the defense’s first witness. We’re now awaiting Nancy Grace’s anuerysm. [AP]

    6 Comments / / Oct 31, 2014 at 9:04 AM
  • Jodi Arias

    Barack Obama, Biglaw, Death Penalty, Gay Marriage, Law Schools, Morning Docket, Real Estate, SCOTUS, Sentencing Law, Supreme Court, Trials

    Morning Docket: 10.21.14

    * When asked what his favorite SCOTUS decision was during his POTUS tenure, Obama said it was the high court’s cert denials on the gay marriage cases. Well played, sir. [Wall Street Journal]

    * “Leverage has started to shift away from law firms.” Despite the fact that their headcounts are rising, Biglaw firms are downsizing office space as rents keep climbing higher. [Am Law Daily]

    * Schools are trying to slap lipstick on the pig that legal education has become amid an “anemic job market.” We bet your law school has some shiny new innovations too. [News Observer]

    * Citing the fact that “the courts do not exist to win popularity contests,” a judge sentenced Oscar Pistorius to five years in prison. Serious question: Will he be allowed to bring his prosthetic legs? [New York Times]

    * Nancy Grace and her friends have pitchforks at the ready because Jodi Arias’s penalty phase retrial begins today, and another jury will decide if she deserves to die for murdering her boyfriend. [Reuters]

    28 Comments / / Oct 21, 2014 at 8:53 AM
  • prison prisoner jail convicted criminal

    Antonin Scalia, Sentencing Law, Supreme Court, White-Collar Crime

    The Supreme Court Lets You Go To Prison (Longer) For What You Weren’t Convicted Of

    This week, the Supreme Court had a chance to fix it. It didn’t.

    7 Comments / / Oct 16, 2014 at 10:05 AM
  • Amanda Bynes

    Celebrities, Crime, Drugs, Health Care / Medicine, Job Searches, Law Schools, Marijuana, Morning Docket, Sentencing Law

    Morning Docket: 10.14.14

    * Law schools are in trouble, but Cooley Law is “going strong” — after all, only “28 percent of last year’s graduates at its Michigan campuses failed to land jobs as lawyers within nine months.” You’re really doing it wrong. [Tampa Bay Times]

    * This guy broke into the University of Oregon School of Law three times, and all he got were these computers for hipsters and a crappy 11-year sentence. (He should’ve broken into the football facility for better loot.) [Register-Guard]

    * Should you go to law school if you know for a fact that you don’t want to be a lawyer? This is the type of question that would render your ATL editors unable to even. [Law Admissions Lowdown / U.S. News]

    * Amanda Bynes has been placed on a 5150 psychiatric hold, and people suddenly care about mental health law. It’s sad that it takes a celebrity to make people care about these issues. [WSJ Law Blog]

    * Marijuana is making its way to the ballot in some states this November, but before you vote, here’s a primer on where it’s legal to smoke weed, where it might be, and where it’s not. [Washington Post]

    12 Comments / / Oct 14, 2014 at 9:08 AM
  • Justice Joan Orie Melvin

    9th Circuit, American Bar Association / ABA, Art, Biglaw, Blogging, Gay, Gay Marriage, Gender, Legal Ethics, Morning Docket, Partner Issues, Sentencing Law, State Judges, Tax Law

    Morning Docket: 10.08.14

    * How are Nevada and Idaho officials reacting to yesterday’s Ninth Circuit ruling striking down gay marriage bans in those states, and how soon might marriages get underway? [BuzzFeed]

    * In other LGBT legal news, New York City is likely to make it easier for transgender individuals to amend their birth certificates. [New York Times]

    * Good news for Joan Orie Melvin, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court justice turned convicted felon: her unorthodox sentence has been stayed (again). [How Appealing]

    * Eduardo Leite, who has led Baker & McKenzie since 2010, gets another two years at the helm of Biglaw’s biggest firm. [American Lawyer]

    * Cravath associate Micaela McMurrough scores a victory in tax court for artists. [New York Times]

    * The ABA has issued a new opinion addressing ethical issues raised during the sale of a law practice. [American Bar Association]

    * Why do lawyers blog? Tim Baran of Rocket Matter talks to 23 of us. [Legal Productivity]

    3 Comments / / Oct 8, 2014 at 8:59 AM
  • She's coming down with a bad case of "going to get a pony."

    Crime, DUI / DWI, Sentencing Law

    The Affluenza Kid And Privilege (This Time The Evidentiary Kind)

    The Affluenza controversy was messed up enough. Now the kid’s lawyers are trying to use another kind of privilege to keep his diagnosis from coming up in a civil case.

    8 Comments / / Aug 6, 2014 at 1:35 PM
  • Jodi Arias

  • syringe lethal injection death penalty Above the Law legal tabloid

    Alex Kozinski, Crime, Death Penalty, Sentencing Law

    Is The Death Penalty Worth It?

    Can we stomach the splatter? Conservative columnist Tamara Tabo argues that the death penalty isn’t worth defending.

    29 Comments / / Jul 24, 2014 at 4:00 PM
  • prison prisoner jail convicted criminal

    Crime, Federal Judges, Sentencing Law

    Qui Tam: District Court

    What is it like to attend a sentencing in federal court?

    2 Comments / / Jul 22, 2014 at 2:18 PM
  • Lindsay Lohan

    Biglaw, Celebrities, Drinking, DUI / DWI, Law Schools, Layoffs, Morning Docket, Murder, Prisons, SCOTUS, Sentencing Law, Staff Layoffs, Supreme Court, Tax Law

    Morning Docket: 04.16.14

    * Noah “Kai” Newkirk, the protestor who disrupted Supreme Court arguments in February, was sentenced to time served and barred from the court. Don’t worry, we’ll get you all the SCOTUS clerk news you need, cutie. [Associated Press]

    * “There are still a lot of firms out there hoping the good old days are going to return, and are finally coming to the realization that that isn’t going to happen.” More on Biglaw layoffs. [Am Law Daily]

    * Yet another law school gets its rating downgraded by Moody’s. As a standalone school with “substantial declines in JD enrollment,” Vermont Law’s outlook is now negative. Sad trombone. [Moody’s]

    * Jason Bohn, the heavily indebted law school grad once profiled by the New York Times, was convicted of murdering his girlfriend last month, and now he’s been sentenced to serve life in prison. [New York Post]

    * “Is the Tax Code really 70,000 pages long?” No, not really. We wonder who started the rumor that it was so long, because in reality, it’s only about 2,600 pages long — which is still way, way too long. [Slate]

    * It appears that the apple doesn’t fall too far from the tree with this celebrity family. Lindsay Lohan’s mother, Dina Lohan, pleaded guilty yesterday to drunken driving and speeding charges in New York. [CNN]

    2 Comments / / Apr 16, 2014 at 9:15 AM
  • Robert Richards IV

  • Jordan Graham and Cody Johnson

    American Bar Association / ABA, Biglaw, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Job Searches, Law Professors, Law School Deans, Law Schools, Money, Morning Docket, Murder, Sentencing Law, Student Loans

    Morning Docket: 03.28.14

    * Scared of an audit, were we? With the unsealing of the case against Dewey’s former finance director comes greater insight into what was really going on behind the scenes at the failed firm. [DealBook / New York Times]

    * The American Bar Association is willing pay up to $15,000 to organizations that match unemployed law grads with jobs to serve the legal needs of the poor. So, how much do the poor law grads get paid? [National Law Journal]

    * Tenure may be “under fire,” but law professors are fighting back — and hard — because law school deans seem unwilling to speak up on their behalf. Let’s face facts though, tenure isn’t going anywhere. [Forbes]

    * It figures one of the faces of America’s $1 trillion of outstanding student loan debt is a lawyer. Hey, heavily indebted lawyers make great headlines and even better first paragraphs. [Big Story / Associated Press]

    * Jordan Graham, the newlywed who pushed her husband of eight days off a cliff, was sentenced to serve 30 years in prison. Protip: an annulment would’ve been a better option than second-degree murder. [CNN]

    4 Comments / / Mar 28, 2014 at 9:01 AM
  • Kevin Trudeau

    Bankruptcy, Food, Habeas Corpus, Labor / Employment, Non-Sequiturs, Partner Issues, Patents, Romance and Dating, Sentencing Law

    Non-Sequiturs: 03.18.14

    * “How many years would you put a TV pitchman in jail? 3 years? 5 years? Don’t answer yet…” [Sentencing Law and Policy]

    * So there’s a sex tape of Chris Christie. Except it isn’t him. They should have known Christie could never be a porn star. You can’t get far in the porn biz by saying, “This lane is closed.” [Gawker]

    * Dolt Duped By Date Sues OKCupid. [NY Post]

    * Patents are a terrible measure of innovation. Hold on, I defy you to besmirch the Anti-Drowning Hat. [Concurring Opinions]

    * Wage theft in fast food shouldn’t come as a surprise, but the role played by the franchise model in creating labor law violations is intriguing. [Lawyers, Guns & Money]

    * A gathering of business development tips, including shout outs to Anonymous Partner and Mark Herrmann. [Corporette]

    * What better qualification to challenge for the Vegas DA’s job than to be prosecuted by that office days before the election? [Las Vegas Law Blog]

    * A Baltimore lawyer aggressively used the habeas process to release mentally ill girls to serve as personal slaves to the wealthy. [Slate]

    * Weil’s Business Finance & Restructuring team is putting together a March Madness bracket based on quotes from bankruptcy decisions. Let the excitement wash over you. Having not seen the bracket yet, I’m reserving judgment on what an awesome array of bankruptcy quotes would look like. [Bankruptcy Blog]

    * Kevin O’Keefe, who presented on my panel at our Attorney@Blog conference, left all of us touched with his tribute to Above the Law. [Real Lawyers Have Blogs]

    1 Comment / / Mar 18, 2014 at 5:17 PM
  • Taron_vl_18_1_gd

    Election Law, Gay, Health Care / Medicine, Law School Deans, Law Schools, Legal Ethics, New Jersey, Non-Sequiturs, Partner Issues, Politics, Prisons, Racism, Sentencing Law, Sexism

    Non-Sequiturs: 03.05.14

    * Upskirt photos not illegal in Massachusetts. The spirit of Kennedy lives on! [Mass Live]

    * The investigation continues into whether Judge Mike Maggio, who might be the infamous Geauxjudge, suffers from a bad case of the Internet Crazies — but in the meantime, his campaign for the Court of Appeals took a hit. [Arkansas Times]

    * Speaking of judicial ethics, Judge Kimberly Brown has been removed from the bench in Indiana. She’s only the third judge ever to be permanently removed from the job. [Indy Star]

    * Wachtell Lipton partner Ricky Mason and his wife, Hoboken mayoral candidate Beth Mason, have been charged with several election-law violations. Uh-oh. [PolitickerNJ]

    * Which state just ruled that you have a reasonable expectation of privacy in texting… even if you’re texting about a heroin deal? [IT-Lex]

    * Dewey love the judge’s name in the Barclays suit over the dead firm’s debts? Yes. Because “Popplewell” is an awesome name. [The Lawyer]

    * The data are in, and the top college grads have passed an all-important math test: they figured out law school is a bad deal. [Associate’s Mind]

    * Yet another Florida law school dean has stepped down. This is what happens when you take a job in a state full of retired people. [Daily Business Review]

    * Obamacare has been credited — and bashed — for a lot, but are we underselling its role in reducing prison populations? [Sentencing Law and Policy]

    4 Comments / / Mar 5, 2014 at 5:35 PM
  • 800px-SQ_Lethal_Injection_Room

    8th Circuit, Death Penalty, Deaths, Federal Judges, Quote of the Day, SCOTUS, Sentencing Law, Supreme Court

    Wheels Of Justice Move Too Slowly For State That’s Really Excited To Kill Prisoners

    Which state has been executing prisoners before courts have finished reviewing their appeals?

    15 Comments / / Jan 31, 2014 at 3:29 PM
  • "Try and make it look painful, we've got a bloodthirsty audience here!"

    Basketball, Death Penalty, Election Law, Eric Holder, Non-Sequiturs, Patents, Sentencing Law

    Non-Sequiturs: 01.29.14

    * Allegations that a prison told a death row inmate to “put on a show” while getting a lethal injection. Just when you thought the death penalty couldn’t manifest itself as more cruel and unusual… [NBC News]

    * A discussion of how early voting is bad. Apparently, after an electoral dialogue that usually lasts a year or more, we’re all lemmings swayed by the events of the last day of campaigning so there’s no justification for allowing voters to show up three days before the finish line. [Volokh Conspiracy / Washington Post]

    * Kentucky legend Richie Farmer’s basketball jersey may be retired, but the Bureau of Prisons decided to give Farmer, now a political figure heading to prison for abusing his office, his old number back as an inmate number. Thanks? [Legal Juice]

    * In last night’s State of the Union address, President Obama came out strong for patent law reform. Exactly the issue he needed to rally voters for the midterms! [Patently-O]

    * And while it didn’t make the address itself, Attorney General Eric Holder is signaling a new administrative interest in reforming the out of whack sentencing laws. [Sentencing Law and Policy]

    * On February 12, our own David Lat will be speaking at Georgetown at an ABA Journal sponsored talk on “#21stCenturyLaw.” Let’s see that hash tag start trending. [ABA Journal]

    * Joshua Gilliland of The Legal Geeks reacts to the revelation that the new costuming for next season’s Doctor Who will ditch Gilliland’s beloved bow tie. Our hearts go out to you in your pain. Video embedded below… [The Legal Geeks]

    2 Comments / / Jan 29, 2014 at 5:58 PM
  • Conjugal Visit RF

    Crime, Sentencing Law

    Conjugal Visits Are Almost A Thing Of The Past

    Did you know that conjugal visits might be really useful to society?

    33 Comments / / Jan 13, 2014 at 2:11 PM

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