Singapore

When my late grandmother heard I was going to law school, she recommended that I go into matrimonial law. It was her view that in a divorce, the real winner isn’t the husband, or the wife, but their attorneys: “The couple ends up with nothing, the lawyers end up with everything!”

That’s not exactly true. My grandmother — who worked as a doctor and not a lawyer, in a country that doesn’t have divorce — was hardly an expert on family law.

But there’s no denying that some divorces are very expensive for the couples — and very lucrative for the lawyers. One Biglaw partner and his (soon to be former) wife have racked up seven figures in legal bills. And they’re not even done yet….

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* Because the Senate doesn’t work properly when it comes to doing things efficiently, Obama will nominate three candidates for the D.C. Circuit. The outrage! The horror! The court-packing! [Legal Times]

* Howrey going to sue everyone in time to meet this bankruptcy deadline? When you’ve only got a few days left before the statute of limitations expires, you file up to 33 suits per day. [Am Law Daily]

* Attack of the lawyer glut! If you’re a recent law school grad who’s still unemployed, chances are high that this chart detailing the ratio of lawyers to job openings will make you shed a tear. [The Atlantic]

* Tey Tsun Hang, the law professor convicted on corruption charges after having an affair with a student, is heading to jail for five months. Giving out all of that extra credit wasn’t worth it after all. [Bloomberg]

* Nidal Hasan, the accused Fort Hood shooter, will be representing himself in his murder trial. He’ll use a “defense of others” argument, which seems obtuse given the nature of the crime. [Huffington Post]

* Bradley Manning’s court-martial began with a bang, with the prosecution arguing that the young intelligence analyst put lives at risk, while his own attorney called him a “humanist.” [New York Times]

* Jill Kelley, the woman who helped bring about the downfall of General David Petraeus by exposing his affair, has filed a lawsuit against government officials alleging privacy violations of all things. [USA Today]

* The night of the Benghazi attacks, President Obama was high on cocaine and having gay sex. Sure, this seems totally reasonable. [Examiner]

* Singapore does not f**k around with sentencing. A professor faces up to five years in jail for each of six charges of corruption arising from consensual sex with a student. [Law and More]

* “Brooklyn D.A.” survives an injunction. But apparently it kind of sucks. [TV Newser]

* An unfortunately accurate story of a chickens**t legal dispute. [Legal Juice]

* An interview with a biochemist going to Yale Law School. [Science to Law]

* Testimony elicited from superheroes may not be admissible. [Law and the Multiverse]

* A legal tech startup has locked up another $5.8 million from a VC to build a new research platform. [Blake Masters]

‘I’d rather use my learned hand.’
(Note: stock photo; not actually Ko.)

Whilst we were kissing one thing led to another and we slept together on his couch. It was my first time and it was over pretty quickly.

Darinne Ko Wen Hui, the law student at the center of the National University of Singapore sex-for-grades corruption scandal, reminiscing on the stand about losing her virginity to Tey Tsun Hang, her alleged law professor-cum-lover.

Extra credit?

Have you ever thought about having sex with a professor in exchange for a good grade? Don’t lie, we’ve all thought about it. Here in America, it wouldn’t be that big of a deal if someone found out about your illicit tryst. Someone might get fired, you might have to retake a class, but that would probably be the end of the story.

But if this had happened in another country, perhaps a country with stricter laws, then the professor in question could be looking at multiple criminal charges, a pretty stiff sentence, and huge monetary fines. And as luck would have it, a sex-for-grades scandal recently occurred in Singapore of all places — the same country that recently “relaxed” its death penalty standards in favor of lifetime imprisonment with caning.

Let’s discuss the allegations of a professor’s hanky-panky with a law student coming straight out of the “Fine Country,” a place where defendants cower in fear over the fines they may face for their alleged behavior….

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This is your brain on drugs in Singapore.

Singapore is where crime goes to die. The country is well-known for having strict laws against crime and even stricter punishments for criminal offenders. Caning gets a lot of press, probably because beating people with sticks sounds barbarous.

State-sanctioned killing is also fairly barbaric, and Singapore does it with even more gusto than our own United States. Singapore has a “zero tolerance” policy for drug use, which means drug users in Singapore can be hung by the state.

Now, Singapore’s deputy prime minister says the country will be loosening the rope around drug offenders. But druggies in Singapore shouldn’t get too excited…

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Readers of the New York Times may have noted an odd correction/apology in the paper last week:

In 1994, Philip Bowring, a contributor to the International Herald Tribune’s op-ed page, agreed as part of an undertaking with the leaders of the government of Singapore that he would not say or imply that Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong had attained his position through nepotism practiced by his father Lee Kuan Yew. In a February 15, 2010, article, Mr. Bowring nonetheless included these two men in a list of Asian political dynasties, which may have been understood by readers to infer that the younger Mr. Lee did not achieve his position through merit. We wish to state clearly that this inference was not intended. We apologize to Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, Minister Mentor Lee Kuan Yew and former Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong for any distress or embarrassment caused by any breach of the undertaking and the article.

What necessitated this rather back-handed apology?
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