Zach Abramowitz

Ed. note: This is the latest post by Above the Law’s guest conversationalist, Zach Abramowitz, of blogcasting platform ReplyAll. You can see some of his other conversations and musings here.

At 30 years old, Ben Shapiro is a Harvard-trained lawyer, founder of Truthrevolt.org, editor-at-large at Breitbart.com, host of the (aptly named) Ben Shapiro Show, and a New York Times bestselling author of five books. He regularly appears as a guest pundit on Fox News and CNN and, just in case that list of accomplishments failed to adequately damage your self-esteem, Ben is also an accomplished violinist. Seriously, that’s enough to make the Tiger Mom herself, Amy Chua, throw up in her mouth.

Ben’s most recent book, The People vs. Barack Obama: The Criminal Case Against the Obama Administration (affiliate link), has created quite a stir, something to which Ben has become accustomed. Over the next few days, we will catch up with Ben and find out more about the merits of the case against the POTUS and about Ben’s place within the legal community.

Now, on to the conversation….

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Ed. note: Please welcome Above the Law’s guest conversationalist, Zach Abramowitz, of blogcasting platform ReplyAll. You can see some of his other conversations and musings here.

Before leaving Biglaw for good, I considered doing what I felt like was the next best thing to launching my own startup: working at a firm whose clients were primarily startups. The pitch from recruiters was always the same: startups and venture capital clients are much better to work with than their “big company” and private equity counterparts.

But I wasn’t buying it. Biglaw is Biglaw. It doesn’t matter if your client is Alcoa or three co-founders with the hottest new dating app (it uses an algorithm to tell you who at the nightclub wants you to buy them a drink); clients will be demanding, and legal work is legal work.

But more and more of my former colleagues who have made the jump have been telling me that there’s truth to the claim that “startups are more fun.” So, to get some clarity on this issue, I decided to invite Ed Zimmerman, the founder of the tech group at Lowenstein Sandler and a columnist at the WSJ Accelerators Blog, to join me for a conversation on this topic. Since on-campus interviews are right around the corner, I thought this topic would be nicely timed.

And since we’re creating the conversation using ReplyAll, make sure to keep checking back on our conversation as it develops over the course of the week…

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Why Working With Startup Clients Is More Fun: A Conversation With Lowenstein’s Ed Zimmerman”

Ed. note: Please welcome Above the Law’s guest conversationalist, Zach Abramowitz, of blogcasting platform ReplyAll. You can see some of his other conversations and musings here.

I’ve used this conversational pulpit to whine about first-world problems like law school exams, Biglaw summer programs, and the like. But if there was one part of my legal experience that I truly enjoyed, it was studying for the bar exam. And one of the main reasons that I loved studying for the bar — I will get into the others soon — was the man who bookends the BARBRI courses each year with his lectures on Torts and Family Law: Roger Schechter. In the conversation posted below, I’ll learn a little more about the man who’s had prospective bar exam takers cracking up in their seats for the last 24 years, and see if he has any other suggestions for making bar study more fun and rewarding — oh, and making sure you pass!

Professor Schechter and I will be creating this conversation using ReplyAll over the course of the week, so check back as the conversations develops. And now, without further ado, the conversation:

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Ed. note: Please welcome Above the Law’s guest conversationalist, Zach Abramowitz, of blogcasting platform ReplyAll. You can see some of his other conversations and musings here.

For those lucky enough to get an offer from a Biglaw firm, you’re probably a few weeks into the decadence that is being a summer associate. And most of you are probably enjoying it. Sure, you’ve been told that once you’re a “real lawyer” you won’t spend your days being wined and dined, and your evenings attending concerts and improv classes.

But for those of you who may not think this whole corporate summer camp is all it’s cracked out to be, I’m here to tell you that you’re not alone. There are at least two other people in the world who share your sentiment. So sit back, relax, and enjoy this conversation with my former colleague Ethan Lutske — the one other person I could find willing to go on the record about how being a summer associate sucks. And if anyone asks, just do what you’ve been doing for the last three weeks and bill your time to “Legal Reading.”

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John Grisham

Ed. note: Please welcome Above the Law’s guest conversationalist, Zach Abramowitz, of blogcasting platform ReplyAll. You can see some of his other conversations and musings here.

Those of you who spent this past weekend doing doc review or due diligence may not think you’ve chosen a particularly thrilling career path. But John Grisham has been making lawyers interesting since 1987, when he first wrote A Time to Kill (affiliate link). We thought it would be fun to catch up with John and learn a little more about the man who’s written over twenty-eight books, more than a dozen of which have been made into hit movies and TV shows.

The conversation, which is being created using ReplyAll, will develop over the course of the week, so check back in as Zach and John continue the conversation….

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Ed. note: Please welcome Above the Law’s guest conversationalist, Zach Abramowitz, of blogcasting platform ReplyAll. You can see some of his other conversations and musings here.

Spring exams are right around the corner, and for most law students, that probably means trying to figure out what went wrong first semester and how to do better this time around. Unless you’re one of the fortunate few who got all As your first semester, hopefully this conversation will give you a better road map for the upcoming exams, or at the very least, make you feel a little better about yourself.

The conversation, which is being created using a new blogging tool called ReplyAll, will develop live on Above the Law over the course of the next few days, so continue to check back as Professors Barry Friedman, John Goldberg, and I continue our discussion…

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We’ve extensively discussed in these pages the dangers of “reply all.” As you can see by paging through those archives, numerous members of the legal profession — associates, partners, deans of prominent law schools — have embarrassed themselves, often in entertaining fashion, with one little click of a button. They thought they were sending a private email to one individual, but whoops! They actually just hit “reply all.”

It’s great when hilarity ensues upon (mis)use of “reply all,” but it’s more common for it to be just annoying. In our age of overcommunication, people need to think more carefully about whether everyone on the original email needs to receive your reply. Do all the other people invited to the holiday party need to know when you’re arriving and what you’re bringing?

(In fairness, sometimes the sender is to blame. Protip: use “bcc.”)

But sometimes “reply all” can actually be a good thing. No, seriously….

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