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Lindsay Lohan

* This just in: Now that the Fifth Circuit has refused to hear the Texas abortion case en banc, it looks like we may see a viable case about a major social issue being brought to Term before SCOTUS after all. [National Law Journal]

* Skadden came out on top of the Bloomberg, Thomson Reuters, and Mergermarket league tables for the highest transactional value of its mergers and acquisitions deals in 2014. Congrats on kicking the competition’s ass. [Am Law Daily]

* Per HBR Consulting, clients are winning the war when it comes to getting legal services on the cheap. Consider this a “call to action for law firms to reconsider the way they do business.” [WSJ Law Blog]

* The Elon University School of Law is completely revamping its academic offerings in order to offer a law degree that can be earned in 2.5 years, and for about $14,000 less. Nice work! [Triad Business Journal]

* Lindsay Lohan’s attorneys filed an amended complaint in her case against Grand Theft Auto’s publisher, this time going so far as to spell their client’s name correctly. [Hollywood, Esq. / Hollywood Reporter]

Melvyn Weiss

The rise and fall of Melvyn Weiss is one of the most dramatic stories within the legal profession. The Bronx-born Weiss, a graduate of NYU Law School, founded Milberg Weiss, which went on to become the nation’s top class-action securities firm. Weiss and his partners became millionaires many times over.

But it turned out that the firm rested on shaky ground. In 2008, Mel Weiss pleaded guilty to participating in a kickback scheme that helped him get clients and cases. Weiss got sentenced to two and a half years in federal prison and had to pay more than $10 million in forfeitures and fines. Milberg Weiss itself had to pay $75 million to settle charges relating to the racketeering conspiracy.

Too bad Weiss had to do prison time. House arrest would have been pretty sweet in his waterfront mansion on Long Island’s Gold Coast, now on the market for $18.8 million….

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Lawyerly Lairs: From A Big House To The Big House And Back Again — Mel Weiss’s $19 Million Mansion”


* Zombies responsible for tort. It’s like Walking Dead but with more motion practice. [PrawfsBlawg]

* As much as you hate pocket dialing someone, you don’t hate it as much as these people who pocket dialed 911 while making a drug deal. [Legal Juice]

* Ever wonder why AIG seemed to fare much worse under the bailout than the banks? Perhaps that’s because the government used the AIG bailout to play favorites and help out all their banking buddies. [Medium]

* Here’s one out of left field: Oregon’s first lady had a secret marriage to an 18-year-old immigrant 11 years her junior. Was this a “green card marriage” (i.e., a felony)? My home state doesn’t have great luck with political figures and legal trouble. [Willamette Week]

* Is law one of the most profitable industries for private companies? Of course it is. [Inc.]

* Guess what? Spending decades decrying “for’ners” for stealing hard-earned American cash, people consistently believe we spend tons more on foreign aid than we really do. [The Volokh Conspiracy / Washington Post]

* Legendary plaintiffs’ attorney Fred Levin talks about the ongoing effort to demonize plaintiffs lawyers. Video after the jump…. [Mimesis Law]

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Non-Sequiturs: 10.09.14″

will provide participants an opportunity to rethink the delivery of legal services, from wills, to dispute resolution, to trial tech and beyond. At this weekend-long competition participants will form teams to tackle projects to try to bring the practice of law, the delivery of legal services, and the administration of justice into the 21st Century. Click here for info and tickets →

Ed. note: This is the latest installment in a series of posts Lateral Link’s team of expert contributors. Larry Latourette is Principal at Lateral Link, focusing exclusively on partner placements with Am Law 200 clients.

In Part 1 of this series, I introduced three lawyers — Alpha, Beta, and Gamma — to help explain the value that a partner candidate can gain from working with the right recruiter. Each candidate was relatively junior, each had in the high six figures in business, and each had decided to leave his or her current firm for the right opportunity. When last we left our intrepid trio, I had used no-name profiles at appropriate firms to obtain interviews for each of them.

While I kept in close contact with each candidate throughout the process (see Anatomy of a Lateral Move for an overview of the steps commonly involved), each candidate had unique issues that required particular attention…

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Much To Gain And Little To Lose From Using The Right Recruiter (Part 2)”

New York has always been the vanguard when it comes to making legal precedent. When Justice Benjamin Cardozo left the New York Court of Appeals to join the U.S. Supreme Court, many viewed it as a step backwards. New York is proposing adopting the Uniform Bar Exam (UBE).

Is this a step backwards or a move forward for New York and the rest of the country?

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Ask The Professor: New York And The Uniform Bar Exam”

Here’s the deal: come out to a bar, play some trivia, win some stuff, hang out with some ATL editors. Sound like a plan? Well, if you’re in Washington, D.C., start marking your calendar.

Many of our D.C.-area law school readers have participated in past Above the Law and Kaplan Bar Review bar trivia nights. For those of you who haven’t, now’s your chance. Come on down and knock those snooty students from your rival schools down a peg. Check out these questions from a prior bar trivia night to see how well you’d have fared. Or just come on down to ask us what it’s like to make fun of people on the Internet for a living. Either way, it’s a good time.

We’ll convene for a night of free food, drinks, and quizzing on Thursday, November 6. Winners get mini iPads for their team (maximum of five per team).

Here are the full details:

Date: Thursday, November 6, 2014
Location: Bier Baron Tavern (1523 22nd St NW)
Doors Open: 6:15 p.m.
Start Time: 7:00 p.m.

Fill out the RSVP form after the jump to attend. We look forward to seeing you!

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “D.C. Law Students: Who Wants To Party With Us And Get Some Free Stuff?”

Earlier this week, we asked readers to submit possible captions for this picture:

Photo credit: Reddit user bdj426

Let’s have a look at what our readers came up with, and vote on the finalists…

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “Caption Contest Finalists: Wherein Law Students Fight Over Politically Incorrect Margin Notes”

In the simplest terms, it is fair to say that law firm starting salaries are flat. The fact that the incidence of $160,000 as the starting salary at the largest law firms is less than it was before the recession is really more a reflection of the changing contours of the large firm market, not the fact that law firms are paying entry-level associates less than they used to. Many law offices that are part of large firms, particularly those in the largest markets, continue to pay $160,000, but the data since 2009 clearly show that the large firm market now also contains many firms that do not pay $160,000. In some ways the data simply reflect the growing cohort of large firms, and it shows that they are not a monolithic entity. In many markets starting salaries of $145,000 or $135,000 or even less are the norm.

James Leipold, executive director of the National Association for Law Placement (NALP), commenting on the shrinking prevalence of $160,000 starting salaries for first-year Biglaw associates in NALP’s 2014 Associate Salary Survey.

(What other information can be gleaned from the 2014 Associate Salary Survey?)

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “NY To $190K? Not So Fast, Because $160K Salaries Are No Longer The Norm”

Would you like a touch of sugar with that, Your Honor?

Federal judges are… fruity! I once visited Chief Judge Alex Kozinski in chambers, where I witnessed the judge engage in a spirited argument with one of his law clerks over the proper way to peel and eat an orange. Everything is up for debate in the Kozinski chambers.

And it seems like Judge Kozinski isn’t the only judicial giant with a fruit fetish. In oral arguments yesterday for Integrity Staffing Solutions v. Busk, concerning whether Amazon warehouse workers can get paid overtime for going through an end-of-day security screening, Justice Elena Kagan raised this fun scenario: if a federal judge orders his clerks to come into chambers early, to cut up his grapefruit and make the rest of his breakfast, should the clerks get paid for that?

As it turns out, this “hypothetical” is based on real life. Which federal judge actually does this?

double red triangle arrows Continue reading “A Blind Item Revealed: A Judge Whose Clerks Must Cut His Grapefruit”

Nobody will be shocked that Wachtell Lipton placed on top of our first-ever ATL Power 100. Yet a full look at ATL’s inaugural law firm rankings does contain some surprises.

How did your firm do?

See the complete ranking (and methodology) here.

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